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Wheeler Hazard Peckham

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Wheeler Hazard Peckham

Birth
Albany, Albany County, New York, USA
Death
27 Sep 1905 (aged 72)
New York, USA
Burial
Menands, Albany County, New York, USA GPS-Latitude: 42.707375, Longitude: -73.7298972
Plot
Lot 18, Section 11
Memorial ID
View Source
Wheeler Hazard Peckham was born in Albany, New York, the eldest son of Rufus Wheeler Peckham and Isabella Adoline Lacey. He was educated at The Albany Academy and Union College. He studied law at his father's partnership with Lyman Tremain. He established the firm of Miller & Peckham in New York City in 1867.

He was involved in the unsuccessful prosecution of New York City Mayor A. Oakey Hall in 1872, and also prosecuted former Tammany Hall leader, William Marcy "Boss" Tweed, in 1873. Peckham again represented the State of New York against Tweed in 1876, when he won a $6 million verdict in a civil fraud suit.

He was appointed by New York Governor Grover Cleveland as New York County District Attorney on November 30, 1883, but resigned after eight days, citing ill health. He then returned to private practice in the Wall Street offices of Miller, Peckham & Dixon, where he focused primarily on civil practice. He also served as the President of the New York City Bar Association from 1892 to 1894.

In 1894, President Grover Cleveland nominated Peckham to the U.S. Supreme Court. However, this nomination was opposed by the U.S. Senator from New York, David B. Hill, who was successful in securing the defeat of the nomination by a Senate vote of 32-41 on February 16, 1894. Hill's opposition to Peckham's nomination appears to have been in retaliation for Peckham's prior prosecution of Tweed.

Peckham married Annie Aertsen Keasbey in 1855.

The Wheeler H. Peckham Papers, 1838-1894, are housed in the Library of Congress, ID No. MSS35744.


Wheeler Hazard Peckham was born in Albany, New York, the eldest son of Rufus Wheeler Peckham and Isabella Adoline Lacey. He was educated at The Albany Academy and Union College. He studied law at his father's partnership with Lyman Tremain. He established the firm of Miller & Peckham in New York City in 1867.

He was involved in the unsuccessful prosecution of New York City Mayor A. Oakey Hall in 1872, and also prosecuted former Tammany Hall leader, William Marcy "Boss" Tweed, in 1873. Peckham again represented the State of New York against Tweed in 1876, when he won a $6 million verdict in a civil fraud suit.

He was appointed by New York Governor Grover Cleveland as New York County District Attorney on November 30, 1883, but resigned after eight days, citing ill health. He then returned to private practice in the Wall Street offices of Miller, Peckham & Dixon, where he focused primarily on civil practice. He also served as the President of the New York City Bar Association from 1892 to 1894.

In 1894, President Grover Cleveland nominated Peckham to the U.S. Supreme Court. However, this nomination was opposed by the U.S. Senator from New York, David B. Hill, who was successful in securing the defeat of the nomination by a Senate vote of 32-41 on February 16, 1894. Hill's opposition to Peckham's nomination appears to have been in retaliation for Peckham's prior prosecution of Tweed.

Peckham married Annie Aertsen Keasbey in 1855.

The Wheeler H. Peckham Papers, 1838-1894, are housed in the Library of Congress, ID No. MSS35744.




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