David McNary

Birth
Scotland
Death 28 Dec 1816 (aged 58–59)
Washington County, Pennsylvania, USA
Burial Paris, Washington County, Pennsylvania, USA
Memorial ID 73168573 · View Source
Suggest Edits

Headstone photo welcome!

May also have been from Ulster, Ireland, had he been a 'Scots-Irish' or 'Ulster Scot.'

From: "The History of Washington County, PA," by Boyd Crumrine, 1882, pg 804:
"James McNary, a native of Scotland, emigrated to this country prior to 1760 and settled in Chanceford Twsp, York Co, PA, where he bought a farm. [A son, James, in 1780, removed to Chartiers Twsp in Washington Co] and in 1783, he [the elder James] removed to Hanover Twsp and purchased a farm near Paris, where he lived till 1796 and died aged 85 years, and was buried in Harmon's Creek churchyard. He had 5 children, of whom David came with his father and settled near him, having purchased 300 acres on Oct. 27, 1783. He married Esther Cowden. He was an elder in Dr. Anderson's Harmon Creek congregation. He died in 1817, leaving 7 children, of whom Mary married Samuel Martin; William married a sister of the Rev. James Ramsey."

From: "The McNary Family with Trees and History," pg. 141, 1907, "The David Branch of the McNary Family", by J. R. McNary, Corresponding Sec'y McNary Association Burgettstown, PA, which book I own an original copy of:

"The Emigration of David McNary to the Land of Promise. David McNary of Chanceford Twsp, York Co, PA bought a farm in Hanover Twsp, Washington Co, PA in 1783 for '75 pounds lawful money of Pennsylvania.' The deed for this land is recorded in Washington Co, PA, although there is some doubt whether his residence was not over the state line in Brooke Co, WV. Born in 1757, 3 years prior to his father, James McNary, the original ancestor, locating upon the 'McNary' homestead in Chanceford Twsp, York Co, PA, it is quite probable that David, the 4th and youngest son, was born in America." [My comments: This date seems rather late compared to the births of his siblings. There is a 9-year gap between his (sister) Jane's birth date and David's. In addition, if David was really married in 1774, he would only have been aged 17 years (rather young for those days). I wish I knew the sources for those two dates. The birth of his son William, in 1775 has a solid source, York County, PA Church Records of the 18th Century, although his mother's name is given incorrectly as 'Sarah.']

"In person, David was a large man and of a 'sandy' complexion. His wife's maiden name was Esther Cowden, no doubt a sister or near relative of the ancestor of the Cowden family, who located upon a part of the 'George Washington tract,' in Mt. Pleasant Twsp, Washington Co, PA at an early day. David McNary died 1817. His will is on record at Washington, PA. His son, William, and John Cowden, no doubt a brother-in-law, are named executors; and of his estate he bequeaths the 1/8th each to his wife, Esther, and to William, Margaret [wife of John Ramsey], Sarah, Mary [wife of Samuel Martin], Elizabeth, Esther and Jane, his seven children."

"Some doubt exists as to the place of burial of David and of his venerable father, James, the 'original ancestor.' William McNary, the only son of David, together with his immediate descendants, are interred in the old graveyard at or near Paris, Washington Co, PA; but the final resting place of the 'pioneer' David, and of his aged father is not certainly or definitely located, the imperfect markings of all graves of that early date being now illegible. While it is possible that their remains are interred in the old Paris or Harmon's Creek Cemetery where many of the succeeding generations lie, yet it is quite probable that the remains of 'Old James,' or his pioneer son, David, and of David's wife, Esther Cowden [Esther is buried at Poland Center Cemetery, Mahoning Co, OH], are at rest in the ancient cemetery or burying place of the old Seceder Congregation, known as 'The Tent' in pioneer days, located some 5 miles south or southwest of Paris, PA, but within the WV border, which seems to have been the earliest burial place established in the Holliday's Cove region."
[This cemetery is now known as Cross Creek Tent Cemetery in Brooke Co, WV.]

"David McNary was an elder in the old Dr. Anderson's Harmon's Creek congregation, under whose teachings his family were reared, and the principles or doctrines of Calvinism instilled, which left its impress upon the succeeding generations and lent to the pioneer settlers of western Pennsylvania a reputation for moral and religious probity second to no other region of our country."

"At the date of the location and settlement of David McNary upon the waters of Harmon's Creek in 1783, the condition of all the region westward of the Monongahela River was most serious; Indian raids, or incursions of the savage tribes from west of the Ohio River upon the unprotected settlers were frequent, and a continuous menace to the pioneers of the northwestern portions of Washington County, being on the extreme boundary of the advance line of civilization! For some time prior to this date, an 'outpost' or 'military station' had been maintained at Holliday's Cove on Harmon's Creek, near the outlet to the Ohio and garrisoned by a detachment of colonial militia or minutemen, whose duty it was to look after the safety of the early settlers. The earlier settlements were always made under the protection and in the vicinity of these frontier 'outposts;' hence it was that frequent settlements, including but a few families, in exposed localities, were made miles in advance, leaving much of the wilderness to the rear, unclaimed and unoccupied. In 1783 large tracts of Washington and Beaver Counties were yet unsettled, unsurveyed and unclaimed under the patent laws of the state; and all of the country to the west and north of the Ohio River was yet an unbroken forest in possession of the native Indian tribes of the northwest."

"By what means of transportation or by what route over the Allegheny Mountains, David McNary, accompanied by his aged father, reached the scene of his new abode upon the western borders of civilization, must now be a matter of conjecture! We know that at this time no 'highways' had been cut through the dense and heavily timbered forest westward from the Monongahela to the Ohio! There existed the old 'Indian' or 'Mingo' trail, which traversed this region from Fort Duquesne at the 'forks of the Ohio,' (Pittsburgh) to the 'Mingo Bottoms' on the Ohio River below Steubenville, passing near Holliday's Cove on Harmon's Creek. If David McNary and his father crossed the Alleghenies by the military road opened by General Forbes in his march over the mountains to capture and destroy Fort Duquesne in 1758, he probably reached his new home from Pittsburgh over the 'Mingo' trail, via Robinson's Run and Cherry Valley, crossing Raccoon Creek and valley at the fair grounds, Burgettstown; thence by Harmon's Creek to the military outpost in the near vicinity of his chosen home, in the new settlement on the eastern banks of the Ohio."

"But, as his brothers, James in 1780, and Thomas in 1782, had preceded David to the 'promised land' beyond the mountains and had already settled in the Chartiers region of Washington County, the 'Shirtee' pioneer days, it would seem that these brothers probably crossed the mountains via Raystown (Bedford) and by the Cumberland road to Redstone Old Fort (now Brownsville) on the Monongahela; whence, crossing this stream they would be within one day's journey of their destination upon Chartier's Creek. At this early day the emigration over the mountains from eastern Pennsylvania was, by either the one or the other of these routes; and the latter or southern route seems to have been the popular one from the frontier outposts back to the older settlements in the East, from whence all needed supplies were obtained."

"Conceding then that the preceding brothers, James and Thomas, had come west over the southern or 'Raystown' road to Redstone Old Fort or Brownsville on the Monongahela, what more natural than that the father and brother should have been admonished to journey through the wilderness by the same route? Once at Redstone Old Fort, father and son would have the benefit of water transportation (by flat boat) down the Monongahela and the Ohio Rivers to locate under the protection of the garrison at Holliday's Cove, thus saving a troublesome and unsafe journey through the wilderness of the interior."

"While the history of the hardships and privations encountered and overcome by these brave and intrepid ancestors in reaching and establishing new homes in this 'wilderness of promise' is now lost to succeeding generations, their descendants are fortunate in possessing the absolute knowledge that when James McNary and his youngest son, David, had in 1783, established a home on the waters of Harmon's Creek in Washington Co, PA, that all of the McNary family, viz, the venerable James McNary, the founder; James, his 2nd son, in 1780, Thomas, the 3rd son in 1782; and now David, the 4th son in 1783, with their families, were all permanently established west of the Alleghenies, save only the eldest son, John, alone of the McNary quartet yet remaining upon the homestead at Chanceford, PA, where they reared large families under all the trials and privations incident to a pioneer life; and subject to the additional menace of numerous Indian incursions from the hostile tribes beyond the Ohio and the upper lakes region; and that John McNary, the oldest son, before his demise in 1802 also provided a home for his family in the new country adjacent to the homes of his brothers, James and Thomas, on the waters of Shirtee, whence his family, after his death, all removed. And the advent of the nineteenth century thus witnessed a reunion of the McNary ancestry in a region destined to become the scene of the greatest agricultural and industrial activity on the face of the globe..."

"Amid such scenes...were the pioneer ancestors of the McNary clan domiciled in this goodly land...And especially is it a matter of congratulations to their descendants of the present day, that their ancestors had neither part nor parcel in the unenviable 'Williamson Expedition' from this region in 1782, that encompassed the brutal massacre of the Moravian Indians at Graudenhutten, thereby placing an indelible stain upon the fair fame, not only of this region, but of the Scots-Irish race as well! And a still further source of satisfaction have this numerous clan, in the knowledge that their ancestors were at the post of duty in the Revolutionary conflict, fighting in the cause of freedom and not fleeing, as did not a few, behind the Alleghenies to shun a patriot's duty to his country in its hour of need!"

From: "McNary Family With Trees and History," by the Publishing Committee, McNary and Simpson printers, Pittsburgh, PA:
"We find, by consulting Spangler's "History and Sketches of York County Families," that Thomas McNary was a volunteer in the Revolutionary War, and captain of the Fourth Company of the Fourth Battalion of the 'Flying Camp' in 1776, which marched to New Jersey and took part in the Battle of Trenton. Also that one David McNary, brother of Thomas, was a private in this same company commanded by Captain Thomas McNary. It may be a matter of interest to know that David McKinley, grandfather of President William McKinley, was a member of this battalion."

From: "20th Century History of the City of Washington and Washington County, PA and Representative Citizens," by Joseph F. McFarland, 1910, page 1294:
"John and David were members of their brother, Captain Thomas McNary's Company, Sixth Battalion, York County Militia, William Ross, colonel, and took part in the campaigns of Washington's army at the battles of Monmouth, Trenton and Brandywine."

From: "The Clan McNary of the USA," by Joseph Rea McNary, 1914:
"Pg. 65-66: "David McNary, the youngest son and founder of the fourth branch of the Pennsylvania clan, was born in York County, PA, in 1757. In person, according to tradition, David was a 'large, robust man, of a sandy complexion.' He married Esther Cowden, probably in York County, and when about 26 years of age, accompanied by his aged father, he, in the year 1783, migrated to Washington Co, PA, locating near the Virginia line in the region adjacent to the pioneer settlement at Holliday's Cove [now West Virginia] nearly opposite the city of Steubenville, OH. David McNary, like his three brothers, John, James and Thomas, was a member of the Associate Church; and like them and also his father before him, was an elder in the same denomination. He died in 1817, aged about 60 years, and was interred, it is believed, in the ancient burying grounds of the Cross Creek Associate Congregation in West Virginia, known as the 'Tent.'"

Pg 66: "David and Esther McNary were the parents of seven children; one son and six daughters., whose descendants comprise the fourth, or 'David' branch of the Pennsylvania family."

Pg. 74-77: "When James McNary [the oldest son of John McNary, the founder of the 'John' branch of our Clan] came west in the year 1796, he visited with his Uncle David, who sublet his nephew a contract in which he [the uncle] had engaged to clear or 'settle' 400 acres for one Joseph Swearingen in Mercer Co, PA. James McNary visited this land in 1796 and made some improvements, and in the following summer, in company with his brother, Malcolm, erected a cabin on the tract and also put in a crop of corn. James returned to York County the same summer and in October 1797, married Margaret Reed, a daughter of Col. Joseph Reed of the same county."

Coming west at this time, the young couple spent the winter months with their uncle, James McNary on Chartiers Creek in [pg 75] Washington Co, PA. Before starting to Mercer County, however, in the spring of 1798, James McNary came in contact with a 'sharper,' one Hugh McKain [McKean] to whom he re-let his contract with his Uncle David to 'settle' the 400 acres in Mercer County; and from this transaction, litigation followed, and suit was brought against McKain by the executors of James McNary's estate in 1814."

"We do not know the results of the litigation, but from some old papers in possession of the writer [Joseph Rea McNary] we get a clear insight into the perversity of Scots-Irish nature, when 'warped in the woof.' The following memorandum by Joseph Pentecost, the attorney for the executors, to Parker Campbell [another attorney to whom he committed the case in his absence] fully explains itself and will enlighten the present and succeeding generations of the methods of the wily frontiersmen of 'claim-jumping' proclivities a hundred years ago:

"John McNary, James Martin, executors of James McNary, deceased vs. Hugh McKain} Covenant-Action of Trespass. Memorandum for Mr. Parker Campbell, who is to attend this case in my absence."

Pg. 76: " David McNary made a contract with Joseph Swearingen in the year 1796 to settle a 400-acre tract of land on the waters of the Shenango, for which he was to have 150 acres for settlement; afterwards, David McNary made a contract with James McNary, deceased, to make the settlement for 100 acres. Then, about the last of March, or first of April, 1798, McNary made an article with Hugh McKain (that article is supposed to be destroyed at the fire of Muthork's house, it being deposited with him for safekeeping), by which article Hugh McKain was to give a conveyance for 40 acres of land about about 4 miles from Washington, perhaps on Ten Mile Creek, for the 100 acres on Shenango; and to receive forty pounds in cash, to boot, which sum was paid; no title has been made by either party. McKain refused to make the title for the forty acres and contends he has a right to both tracts, and McNary and Swearingen not having it in their power to make him a title to the 100 acres before mentioned, alleging that the whole 400 acre tract belonged to him."

"It was proposed to McKain to leave to the counsel on both sides (to adjudicate) which he refused to do. It was then proposed to leave it to his own counsel (Mr. O. Jennings) which he (McKain) finally refused. The plaintiffs offered to give security to make him a sufficient title to the 100 acres if he would give the necessary [pg 77] certificate which would enable them to secure a patent, which he also refused. These facts can be proved by Mr. Jennings and David McNary, who were present at the time. McKain has made no title to the 40 acres; and he holds the 40 pounds and the title to both tracts. He ought to be obliged to make a title to the forty acres, and also be forced to make or give the necessary certificate, so as to enable the executors to procure a patent for the 400 acre tract, so that he may get his 100 acres, David McNary his 50 acres and Swearingen the residue, or damages to cover the whole."

"Mr. Campbell will oblige by attending to this business for me. Joseph Pentecost, atty."

"This James McNary (the grandfather of the writer, Joseph Rea McNary) died in 1809. His brother, John, and his brother-in-law, James Martin, were executors of his estate and the suit against McKain (McKean) was instituted in 1814. From some old subpoena notices preserved, we find the affair was finally brought before arbitrators: Joseph Pentecost, Obadiah Jennings, and Parker Campbell, on the 25th day of Nov, 1815. We have the original affidavit of his uncle James, son of James the first (and founder of the 'James' branch of our Clan) who died about a month preceding the above date; and the testimony of his uncle, [pg. 78] David, and also his brother, Malcolm [the latter having assisted James in putting in a crop of corn on the tract of the waters of the Shenango the summer of 1797] all corroborating the facts set forth in the memorandum of attorney Pentecost."

"But, we have no record of the finding of the board of arbitration, whether the scheme of the 'claim-jumper,' in lieu of the destroyed Article of Contract was successful in defeating the ends of justice, by the triumph of a bold and glaring fraud!"

From: This next record is gleaned from a pamphlet written in 1898 on the McNary family by Rev. W. P. McNary of Tarkio, MO, 'The Will of David McNary':

"In the name of God, Amen. I, David McNary, of Hanover Twsp, Washington Co, state of Pennsylvania, farmer, being advanced in years and weak body, but of sound mind and memory and understanding, blessed by God for the same. But considering the uncertainty of this transitory life, do make and publish this, my last will and testament, in manner and form following, to wit:

"Principally and first of all, I commend my immortal soul into the hands of God who give it, and my body to the earth, to be buried in a decent and Christian-like manner at the discretion of my executors hereinafter named, and as to such worldly estate herewith it hath pleased God to bless me in this life, I give and dispose of the same in the following manner, to wit:

"First, it is my will, and I do order that all of my just debts and funeral expense be duly paid and satisfied as soon as can conveniently be after my decease."

"Item 1-I give and bequeath unto my beloved wife, Esther McNary, the one-third of all my moveable property, and also the one-third of the profits arising from my real estate during her natural life or widowhood, with the menchow[?] [mansion] house and housing to live in, and I do order and empower my executors, with my wife's consent, at any time after my decease, to sell for a fair price and convey my real estate to the purchase, and I do bequeath unto my said wife, Esther, an equal part of the price of the land when sold with the rest of my children, to dispose of as she may think proper, in lieu of dowry."

"Item-I give and bequeath to my son, William McNary, the one-eighth part of my real estate when sold."

"Item-I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Margaret, now wife of John Ramsey, the eighth part of the money raised by the sale of my real estate, when sold."

"Item-I give and bequeath to my daughter, Sarah, all her wearing apparel, one good feather bed and bedding, one horse creature and saddle and bridle, two cows, one bureau, one spinning wheel, and the eighth part of money raised by the sale of my real estate, when sold."

"Item-I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Mary, now wife of Samuel Martin, the eighth part of the money raised from my real estate when sold."

"Item-I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Elizabeth, all her wearing apparel, one good feather bed and bedding, one horse creature and saddle and bridle, two cows and one bureau, and one spinning wheel, and the eighth part of the money raised by the sale of real estate when sold."

"Item-I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Esther, all her wearing apparel, one feather bed and bedding, one horse creature, and saddle and bridle, two cows and one bureau, and one spinning wheel, and the eighth part of the money raised by the sale of my real estate, when sold."

"Item-I give and bequeath to my daughter, Jenny, all her wearing apparel, one feather bed and bedding, one horse creature, and saddle and bridle, two cows and one bureau, and one spinning wheel, and the eighth part of the money raised by the sale of my real estate, when sold."

"And lastly, I do nominate, constitute and appoint my wife, Esther, and my son, William McNary of Virginia [now Brooke Co, West Virginia] and John Cowden of Washington County [PA, John being her brother], to be my executors of this my last will, and hereby revoking wills, decrees and bequests by me heretofore made, and declaring this and no other to be my last will and testament. In witness hereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 28th day of December, in the year of our Lord, 1816. David McNary, with signatures of Matthew Russell and Thomas McNary, witnesses.
___________________________________________________________

U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 Record for David McNary, Nat'l #33695, approval date 7 June 1920, Pennsylvania Society membership application of Lloyd Montford Davies:

"I, Lloyd Montford Davies, being of the age of 21 years and upwards, hereby apply for membership in this society by right of lineal descent in the following line from David McNary, who was born in Chanceford Twsp, York Co, PA on the ___ day of ___, 1757, died on the __ day of __, 1817, and who assisted in the establishment of American independence."

"I was born in Burgettstown, County of Washington, state of PA on the 28th day of June, 1875."

1) I am the son of John Thomas Davies, born 1850, died 1884, and Amanda Madora McNary, born 1853, died 1916, married 1874;

2) grandson of William McNary, born 1812, died 1882, and his wife, Letitia Watt, born 1820, died 1892, married 1840;

3) great grandson of William McNary, Sr, born ____, died __, and Margaret Ramsey, born ___, died ___, married ___;

4) great-great grandson of David McNary, born 1754, died 1817, and his wife, Esther Cowden, born ___, died ___, married ___;

"And he, the said David McNary (No. 4) is the ancestor who assisted in establishing American independence, while acting in the capacity of private in Capt. Thomas McNary's York Co, PA militia."

Ancestor's Service
Attached a letter from the Penn State Library dated 5 May 1920:
"To whom it may concern:
I hereby certify that one David McNary was a private in Capt. Thomas McNary's company, Eighth Class, Sixth Battalion, York Co. Militia, commanded by Col. William Ross, April 26, 1778.
See page 549, Vol. 2, Pennsylvania Archives, Sixth Series.
H.H. Shenk, Custodian of the Public Records."

Also attached is an abbreviated family tree.
Next page:
Ancestor's Service:
"He was a private in Capt. Thomas McNary's company, Sixth Battalion, York Co, militia, William Ross, colonel, 1778, and participated with his command in Washington's campaign in the vicinity of Philadelphia, and in New Jersey, the ancestor of President McKinley being in the same company."

"David McNary, with his family, was a pioneer settler west of the Alleghenies, having purchased a farm in Hanover Twsp, Washingont Co, PA (in the King's Creek region) in 1787, where he and his son, William McNary, Sr ended their days and were interred in the cemetery at Paris, PA, but the exact dates of death of the ancestor, William McNary Sr, and his wife Margaret Ramsey, are not available for record."
"David McNary died in 1817, and his will is on record at Washington Co, PA."

He [Lloyd Montford Davies] also stated the names of his children and their birthdates:
Marion Lane Davies, Sept. 9, 1908
Clayton Montford Davies, Dec. 10, 1911

The following are references to the authorities for the above statement:
E.A. McNary, Burgettstown, PA
J.R. McNary, Burgettstown, PA
___________________________________________________________

U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 Record for David McNary, Nat'l #34336, approval date 21 Feb. 1921, Pennsylvania Society membership application of Glenn Davies Stottlemeyer:

"I, Glenn Davies Stottlemeyer, being of the age of 21 years and upwards, hereby apply for membership in this society by right of lineal descent in the following line from David McNary, who was born in Chanceford Twsp, York Co, PA on the ___ day of ___, 1757, died on the __ day of __, 1817, and who assisted in the establishment of American independence."

"I was born in Burgettstown, County of Washington, state of PA on the 11th day of Dec. 1893."

"I am the son of David D. Stottlemeyer, born 1860, died ___, and Amanda Madora McNary, born 1853, died 1916, married 1874;

2) grandson of William McNary, born 1812, died 1882, and his wife, Letitia Watt, born 1820, died 1892, married 1840;

3) great grandson of William McNary, Sr, born ____, died __, and Margaret Ramsey, born ___, died ___, married ___;

4) great-great grandson of David McNary, born 1754, died 1817, and his wife, Esther Cowden, born ___, died ___, married ___;

"And he, the said David McNary (No. 4) is the ancestor who assisted in establishing American independence, while acting in the capacity of private in Capt. Thomas McNary's York Co, PA militia."

Ancestor's Service:
"He was a private in Capt. Thomas McNary's company, Sixth Battalion, York Co, militia, William Ross, colonel, 1778, and participated with his command in Washington's campaign in the vicinity of Philadelphia, and in New Jersey, the ancestor of President McKinley being in the same company."

"David McNary, with his family, was a pioneer settler west of the Alleghenies, having purchased a farm in Hanover Twsp, Washingont Co, PA (in the King's Creek region) in 1787, where he and his son, William McNary, Sr ended their days and were interred in the cemetery at Paris, PA, but the exact dates of death of the ancestor, William McNary Sr, and his wife Margaret Ramsey, are not available for record."
"David McNary died in 1817, and his will is on record at Washington Co, PA."

Applicant's wife's name: Mary Duncan Stottlemeyer
Names of children of applicant:
John Eugene Stottlemeyer, April 19, 1917,Burgettstown, PA
Robert Duncan Stottlemeyer, April 15, 1920, Burgettstown, PA
___________________________________________________________

U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 Record for David McNary, Nat'l #34338, approval date 21 Feb. 1921, Pennsylvania Society membership application of Wade Lindley Stottlemeyer:

"I, Wade Lindley Stottlemeyer, being of the age of 21 years and upwards, to wit, twenty-nine years, hereby apply for membership in this society by right of lineal descent in the following line from David McNary, who was born in Chanceford Twsp, York Co, PA on the ___ day of ___, 1757, died on the __ day of __, 1817, and who assisted in the establishment of American independence."

"I was born in Burgettstown, County of Washington, state of PA on the 7th day of March 1897."

"I am the son of David D. Stottlemeyer, born 1860, died ___, and Amanda Madora McNary, born 1853, died 1916, married 1874;

2) grandson of William McNary, born 1812, died 1882, and his wife, Letitia Watt, born 1820, died 1892, married 1840;

3) great grandson of William McNary, Sr, born ____, died __, and Margaret Ramsey, born ___, died ___, married ___;

4) great-great grandson of David McNary, born 1754, died 1817, and his wife, Esther Cowden, born ___, died ___, married ___;

"And he, the said David McNary (No. 4) is the ancestor who assisted in establishing American independence, while acting in the capacity of private in Capt. Thomas McNary's York Co, PA militia."

Ancestor's Service:
"He was a private in Capt. Thomas McNary's company, Sixth Battalion, York Co, militia, William Ross, colonel, 1778, and participated with his command in Washington's campaign in the vicinity of Philadelphia, and in New Jersey, the ancestor of President McKinley being in the same company."

"David McNary, with his family, was a pioneer settler west of the Alleghenies, having purchased a farm in Hanover Twsp, Washingont Co, PA (in the King's Creek region) in 1787, where he and his son, William McNary, Sr ended their days and were interred in the cemetery at Paris, PA, but the exact dates of death of the ancestor, William McNary Sr, and his wife Margaret Ramsey, are not available for record."
"David McNary died in 1817, and his will is on record at Washington Co, PA."

Applicant's wife's name:
Names of children of applicant:

The following are references to the authorities for the above statement:
Lloyd M. Davies, Burgettstown, PA
E.A. McNary, Burgettstown, PA
J.R. McNary, Burgettstown, PA
___________________________________________________________

U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 Record for David McNary, Nat'l #34337, approval date 21 Feb. 1921, Pennsylvania Society membership application of Robert William Stottlemeyer:

"I, Robert William Stottlemeyer, being of the age of 21 years and upwards, to wit, twenty-five years, hereby apply for membership in this society by right of lineal descent in the following line from David McNary, who was born in Chanceford Twsp, York Co, PA on the 14th [partially erased] day of Feb. [partially erased] 1757, died in Washington Co, PA on the __ day of __, 1817, and who assisted in the establishment of American independence."

"I was born in Burgettstown, County of Washington, state of PA on the 14th day of Feb. 1896."

"I am the son of David D. Stottlemeyer, born 1860, died ___, and Amanda Madora McNary, born 1853, died 1916, married 1874;

2) grandson of William McNary, born 1812, died 1882, and his wife, Letitia Watt, born 1820, died 1892, married 1840;

3) great grandson of William McNary, Sr, born ____, died __, and Margaret Ramsey, born ___, died ___, married ___;

4) great-great grandson of David McNary, born 1754, died 1817, and his wife, Esther Cowden, born ___, died ___, married ___;

"And he, the said David McNary (No. 4) is the ancestor who assisted in establishing American independence, while acting in the capacity of private in Capt. Thomas McNary's York Co, PA militia."

Ancestor's Service:
"He was a private in Capt. Thomas McNary's company, Sixth Battalion, York Co, militia, William Ross, colonel, 1778, and participated with his command in Washington's campaign in the vicinity of Philadelphia, and in New Jersey, the ancestor of President McKinley being in the same company."

"David McNary, with his family, was a pioneer settler west of the Alleghenies, having purchased a farm in Hanover Twsp, Washingont Co, PA (in the King's Creek region) in 1787, where he and his son, William McNary, Sr ended their days and were interred in the cemetery at Paris, PA, but the exact dates of death of the ancestor, William McNary Sr, and his wife Margaret Ramsey, are not available for record."
"David McNary died in 1817, and his will is on record at Washington Co, PA."

Applicant's wife's name:
Names of children of applicant:

The following are references to the authorities for the above statement:
Lloyd M. Davies, Burgettstown, PA
E.A. McNary, Burgettstown, PA
J.R. McNary, Burgettstown, PA


Family Members

Parents
Spouse
Siblings
Children

Inscription

From: "The McNary Family with Trees and History," pg. 141, 1907, "The David Branch of the McNary Family", by J. R. McNary, Corresponding Sec'y McNary Association Burgettstown, PA, which book I own an original copy of:
"Some doubt exists as to the place of burial of David and of his venerable father, James, the 'original ancestor.' William McNary, the only son of David, together with his immediate descendants, are interred in the old graveyard at or near Paris, Washington Co, PA; but the final resting place of the 'pioneer' David, and of his aged father is not certainly or definitely located, the imperfect markings of all graves of that early date being now illegible. While it is possible that their remains are interred in the old Paris or Harmon's Creek Cemetery where many of the succeeding generations lie, yet it is quite probable that the remains of 'Old James,' of his pioneer son, David, and of David's wife, Esther Cowden, are at rest in the ancient cemetery or burying place of the old Seceder Congregation, known as 'The Tent' in pioneer days, located some 5 miles south or southwest of Paris, PA, but within the WV border, which seems to have been the earliest burial place established in the Holliday's Cove region."
[This cemetery is now known as Cross Creek Tent Cemetery in Brooke Co, WV.]


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  • Created by: NancyPoquette
  • Added: 10 Jul 2011
  • Find a Grave Memorial 73168573
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for David McNary (1757–28 Dec 1816), Find a Grave Memorial no. 73168573, citing Paris Cemetery, Paris, Washington County, Pennsylvania, USA ; Maintained by NancyPoquette (contributor 47511280) .