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Dorman Bridgeman Eaton

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Dorman Bridgeman Eaton

Birth
Hardwick, Caledonia County, Vermont, USA
Death
23 Nov 1899 (aged 76)
New York, New York County, New York, USA
Burial
Montpelier, Washington County, Vermont, USA GPS-Latitude: 44.2576447, Longitude: -72.5983963
Memorial ID
View Source
son of Nathaniel Eaton 1790 – 1878 and Ruth Bridgeman 1794 – 1826
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Extracted from The Evening Star (Washington, D.C.) December 25, 1899 page 3
Dorman B. Eaton, who has been called the father of the merit system in the government civil service in the United States, died in New York Saturday. An eminent civil service reformer, who was interested with Mr. Eaton in his efforts to secure the merit system as a permanent institution in the nation and the state, in speaking of Mr. Eaton said: “Mr. Eaton was one of the first to take up the study of civil service reform, and his interest in it never flagged up to the day of his death. Realizing that the application of the principle would arouse intense opposition among politicians, who had long looked upon political offices as their legitimate spoils, he was disposed to e conservative. Others who were associated with him wanted the entire federal service to be placed upon a merit basis at once, but he opposed this policy and advocated the extension of the system slowly.”

Mr. Eaton was born at Hardwick, Caldeonia county, Vermont, June 27, 1823. Graduating from the University of Vermont in 1848, he took a course in the Harvard Law School, from which he was graduated in 1850. He moved to New York city and began the practice of his profession in partnership with the late Judge William Kent, the author of “Kent’s Commentaries.”

His first connection with the civil service reform movement followed closely upon a visit in 1866 to Europe, during which he gave considerable study to the development of the civil service in various countries. After his return Mr. Eaton took a prominent part in the movement which resulted in the crushing of the Tweed ring, and as a consequence of his work he was assaulted by one of the followers of the Tammany boss and so seriously injured that for several years he was unable to practice.

Mr. Eaton was the principal author of the Pendleton act—the existing civil service law—and President Arthur appointed him as a member of the first commission. He resigned in 1885, and was reappointed in the same year by President Cleveland. In April, 1886, feeling that he had done his share in the establishment of a permanent merit system, Mr. Eaton handed his resignation to President Cleveland.

Contributor: Loretta Castaldi (47472615)
son of Nathaniel Eaton 1790 – 1878 and Ruth Bridgeman 1794 – 1826
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Extracted from The Evening Star (Washington, D.C.) December 25, 1899 page 3
Dorman B. Eaton, who has been called the father of the merit system in the government civil service in the United States, died in New York Saturday. An eminent civil service reformer, who was interested with Mr. Eaton in his efforts to secure the merit system as a permanent institution in the nation and the state, in speaking of Mr. Eaton said: “Mr. Eaton was one of the first to take up the study of civil service reform, and his interest in it never flagged up to the day of his death. Realizing that the application of the principle would arouse intense opposition among politicians, who had long looked upon political offices as their legitimate spoils, he was disposed to e conservative. Others who were associated with him wanted the entire federal service to be placed upon a merit basis at once, but he opposed this policy and advocated the extension of the system slowly.”

Mr. Eaton was born at Hardwick, Caldeonia county, Vermont, June 27, 1823. Graduating from the University of Vermont in 1848, he took a course in the Harvard Law School, from which he was graduated in 1850. He moved to New York city and began the practice of his profession in partnership with the late Judge William Kent, the author of “Kent’s Commentaries.”

His first connection with the civil service reform movement followed closely upon a visit in 1866 to Europe, during which he gave considerable study to the development of the civil service in various countries. After his return Mr. Eaton took a prominent part in the movement which resulted in the crushing of the Tweed ring, and as a consequence of his work he was assaulted by one of the followers of the Tammany boss and so seriously injured that for several years he was unable to practice.

Mr. Eaton was the principal author of the Pendleton act—the existing civil service law—and President Arthur appointed him as a member of the first commission. He resigned in 1885, and was reappointed in the same year by President Cleveland. In April, 1886, feeling that he had done his share in the establishment of a permanent merit system, Mr. Eaton handed his resignation to President Cleveland.

Contributor: Loretta Castaldi (47472615)


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