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Clara Cornelia <I>Blair</I> Tate

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Clara Cornelia Blair Tate

Birth
Fulton County, Illinois, USA
Death
4 Feb 1919 (aged 69)
Kansas, USA
Burial
Oxford, Sumner County, Kansas, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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Wellington Daily News
Wellington, KS
Saturday, February 8, 1919
Page 1, Columns 4 & 5

Obituary

Mrs. Frank Tate passed to her eternal rest on Tuesday, Feb. 4th, shortly before the midnight hour, after an illness of about 10 days during which time she was not thought to be seriously ill until about one-half hour before her death, when she seized with rhematism of the heart and all that human hands could do could not save her for the Silent Reaper had come to gather another of his well-ripened sheaves. Clara Cornelia Blair was born in Fulton county, Illinois, Sept. 20, 1849, and at the age of 10 years moved with her parents to Miami county, Kansas, where she grew to womanhood and was married to Frank Tate Jan. 10, 1869, they having celebrated their golden wedding day less than a month ago. To them six children were born, five of whom survive her and are named in the order of their ages as follows: Mrs. J. E. Hartsell of Oxford, Kansas; Mrs. T. M. King of Square Butte, Montana; Mrs. R. C. Brown of Oxford, Kansas; Mrs. S. A. Scott of Wellington, Kansas; John G. Tate of Quapaw, Okla.

The one whose place has been vacant in the family circle so long is Mrs. A. J. Kiefer the oldest daughter, who died at Newkirk, Okla., 19 years ago. The greater part of their married life was spent on the farm in Oxford township, having come there in 1872 among the pioneer settlers of that community where they lived until 1905, when they moved to Wellington where they have since resided.

Mother Tate was with us her alloted time and while the immutable laws of God have caused a precious one to go to a well earned rest, it seemed hard to be deprived of more of her goodness, benevolence, counsel and exemplary life. Hers was the spirit of a womanly woman, a woman of a kind, tender and benevolent heart, a soul charitable in deed and thought. Her life was for others and her efforts and labors for her home and the comfort and pleasure of those around her. Funeral services were conducted at the home Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock by Rev. H. J. Cockerill of the M. E. church, in the presence of many friends and neighbors, all the children being present except Mrs. T. M. King who on account of distance could not attend. Wreaths and garlands of flowers were brought by loving friends and placed upon the casket until it seemed that only flowers could be seen and then the still form was laid to rest in the Oxford cemetery.

She is at rest from all the pain and sorrow,

The cares and roughness of the toilsome way,

The doubts, the anxious fears about the morrow,

The wearisome nights and burdens of the day.

Note: obit provided by Lorena (#46917011)
Wellington Daily News
Wellington, KS
Saturday, February 8, 1919
Page 1, Columns 4 & 5

Obituary

Mrs. Frank Tate passed to her eternal rest on Tuesday, Feb. 4th, shortly before the midnight hour, after an illness of about 10 days during which time she was not thought to be seriously ill until about one-half hour before her death, when she seized with rhematism of the heart and all that human hands could do could not save her for the Silent Reaper had come to gather another of his well-ripened sheaves. Clara Cornelia Blair was born in Fulton county, Illinois, Sept. 20, 1849, and at the age of 10 years moved with her parents to Miami county, Kansas, where she grew to womanhood and was married to Frank Tate Jan. 10, 1869, they having celebrated their golden wedding day less than a month ago. To them six children were born, five of whom survive her and are named in the order of their ages as follows: Mrs. J. E. Hartsell of Oxford, Kansas; Mrs. T. M. King of Square Butte, Montana; Mrs. R. C. Brown of Oxford, Kansas; Mrs. S. A. Scott of Wellington, Kansas; John G. Tate of Quapaw, Okla.

The one whose place has been vacant in the family circle so long is Mrs. A. J. Kiefer the oldest daughter, who died at Newkirk, Okla., 19 years ago. The greater part of their married life was spent on the farm in Oxford township, having come there in 1872 among the pioneer settlers of that community where they lived until 1905, when they moved to Wellington where they have since resided.

Mother Tate was with us her alloted time and while the immutable laws of God have caused a precious one to go to a well earned rest, it seemed hard to be deprived of more of her goodness, benevolence, counsel and exemplary life. Hers was the spirit of a womanly woman, a woman of a kind, tender and benevolent heart, a soul charitable in deed and thought. Her life was for others and her efforts and labors for her home and the comfort and pleasure of those around her. Funeral services were conducted at the home Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock by Rev. H. J. Cockerill of the M. E. church, in the presence of many friends and neighbors, all the children being present except Mrs. T. M. King who on account of distance could not attend. Wreaths and garlands of flowers were brought by loving friends and placed upon the casket until it seemed that only flowers could be seen and then the still form was laid to rest in the Oxford cemetery.

She is at rest from all the pain and sorrow,

The cares and roughness of the toilsome way,

The doubts, the anxious fears about the morrow,

The wearisome nights and burdens of the day.

Note: obit provided by Lorena (#46917011)


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