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LCDR Alfred Jack Sewell

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LCDR Alfred Jack Sewell

Birth
Death
3 Oct 1943 (aged 30)
New Gloucester, Cumberland County, Maine, USA
Burial
Kittery, York County, Maine, USA Add to Map
Plot
136
Memorial ID
View Source
Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve (RNVR), Lt. Commander. While stationed at the Brunswick Naval Air Station, LCDR Sewell was killed when his plane, and the plane of Sub Lieutenant David J.F. Waston collided in mid-air during a training exercise. LCDR Sewell was buried 7 Oct 1943 with full military honors. Lt Watson was buried along side LCDR Sewell in site No. 137.

Naval Air Station Brunswick (IATA: NHZ, ICAO: KNHZ, FAA LID: NHZ), also known as NAS Brunswick, was a military airport located 2 miles (3.2 km) northeast of Brunswick, Maine. The base was home to a number of Navy-operated Maritime patrol aircraft. Before closing, the base continued to operate as part of its closing procedures while the airport was operating publicly under the name Brunswick Executive Airport.

The base closed on May 31st, 2011, as per the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure committee decision. As of November 28, 2009, the last aircraft (P-3 Orions) left. The runways were permanently closed in January 2010.

After closing, the base will be known as Brunswick Landing. Base redevelopment officials hope to reopen the former Navy airfield as a civilian airport and a "Green Energy Park"

World War II

Naval Air Station Brunswick, Maine, was originally constructed and occupied in March 1943, and was first commissioned on April 15, 1943, to train and form-up Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm pilots to fly squadrons of the Chance Vought F4U Corsair, and of the Grumman TBF Avenger and F6F Hellcat, for the British Naval Command. The 1,487-acre (6 km²) station was built in part on land that was donated by the town of Brunswick. By the early 1940s the town was using most of this land to operate a small municipal airport, which would become the core of the air station.

Operating under the motto, "Built For Business", the first U.S. squadron to arrive at NAS Brunswick was a heavier-than-air Scouting Squadron (VS1D1). During World War II, pilots from NAS Brunswick as well as those of the Royal Navy/Fleet Air Arms used the station as a base from which they carried out anti-submarine warfare missions with around-the-clock efficiency. The air station had a Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm, but the squadrons also practiced at other airports in Maine before eventual transport to Britain. At the peak of its wartime operations, the station was supporting three auxiliary landing fields - one at Sanford, one at Rockland, and one at Auburn, Maine. On August 15, 1945 Japan surrendered to Allied forces, ending the war. As a result, NAS Brunswick was scheduled for deactivation.
Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve (RNVR), Lt. Commander. While stationed at the Brunswick Naval Air Station, LCDR Sewell was killed when his plane, and the plane of Sub Lieutenant David J.F. Waston collided in mid-air during a training exercise. LCDR Sewell was buried 7 Oct 1943 with full military honors. Lt Watson was buried along side LCDR Sewell in site No. 137.

Naval Air Station Brunswick (IATA: NHZ, ICAO: KNHZ, FAA LID: NHZ), also known as NAS Brunswick, was a military airport located 2 miles (3.2 km) northeast of Brunswick, Maine. The base was home to a number of Navy-operated Maritime patrol aircraft. Before closing, the base continued to operate as part of its closing procedures while the airport was operating publicly under the name Brunswick Executive Airport.

The base closed on May 31st, 2011, as per the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure committee decision. As of November 28, 2009, the last aircraft (P-3 Orions) left. The runways were permanently closed in January 2010.

After closing, the base will be known as Brunswick Landing. Base redevelopment officials hope to reopen the former Navy airfield as a civilian airport and a "Green Energy Park"

World War II

Naval Air Station Brunswick, Maine, was originally constructed and occupied in March 1943, and was first commissioned on April 15, 1943, to train and form-up Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm pilots to fly squadrons of the Chance Vought F4U Corsair, and of the Grumman TBF Avenger and F6F Hellcat, for the British Naval Command. The 1,487-acre (6 km²) station was built in part on land that was donated by the town of Brunswick. By the early 1940s the town was using most of this land to operate a small municipal airport, which would become the core of the air station.

Operating under the motto, "Built For Business", the first U.S. squadron to arrive at NAS Brunswick was a heavier-than-air Scouting Squadron (VS1D1). During World War II, pilots from NAS Brunswick as well as those of the Royal Navy/Fleet Air Arms used the station as a base from which they carried out anti-submarine warfare missions with around-the-clock efficiency. The air station had a Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm, but the squadrons also practiced at other airports in Maine before eventual transport to Britain. At the peak of its wartime operations, the station was supporting three auxiliary landing fields - one at Sanford, one at Rockland, and one at Auburn, Maine. On August 15, 1945 Japan surrendered to Allied forces, ending the war. As a result, NAS Brunswick was scheduled for deactivation.

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