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Judge Franklin Hardin

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Judge Franklin Hardin

Birth
Fleming County, Kentucky, USA
Death
29 Jul 1890 (aged 80)
Johnson County, Indiana, USA
Burial
Greenwood, Johnson County, Indiana, USA
Memorial ID
71665892 View Source

The Franklin Democrat, Friday, August 1, 1890 Volume XXXI, Number 6, page 3, column 3

Death of Judge Franklin Hardin.

Judge Franklin Hardin died at his home in White River Township, on Tuesday morning at six o'clock, after an illness of several days. The funeral, which was largely attended, took place from his late residence on Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock, the remains being interred in the cemetery at Glenn's Valley.

Judge Hardin was born July 27th, 1810, in Nicholas County, Ky. His family were of French descent. On the death of his father, October 5th, 1825, he studied surveying at Carlyle seminary, Ky., a knowledge that was very useful to Johnson County in later years. In 1825 when fifteen years of age, with his mother the family immigrated to White River Township on horseback. In his eighteenth year he began life as a school teacher, and in 1829 he entered into the study of law. Sickness caused him to desist, and upon his recovery he again entered the school room. In 1831 he returned to Kentucky where he married. In the fall of 1832 he moved to Johnson County and located the farm upon which he lived and died. A year's severe illness followed for he was far from being a robust youth and he was compelled to return to Kentucky. Returning in the fall of 1833 he was made assessor of White River Township. In the spring of 1836 he received the appointment of county surveyor from Judge Wick, which he held for six years, an office for which he was qualified in a high degree to fill.

Politics in the county had never cut much figure until about 1840 when the whig and democratic lines began to be closely drawn, and the year 1882 saw Judge Hardin in the political arena as the democratic nominee for representative to the legislature and without much opposition he was elected. In 1848 he was again nominated and elected, and in 1844 was again elected to the same office. In 1845 he was elected as State Senator and in 1849 was again elected to the same office. In 1850 he was elected a delegate to the constitutional convention, having the distinguished honor of being a State Senator and a delegate both at the same time. "Three years in the house and six in the senate, rounded off with a seat in the convention that changed the organic law of the land, was a line of honorable legislative service that has fallen to the lot of but a limited number throughout the state." On his return home, he was again made county surveyor in 1851 and held the office one year, when by an act of the legislature approved May 14, 1852, a new court, the common pleas, was organized, and Mr. Hardin was nominated and elected as Judge, defeating A. B. Hunter, of Franklin, who was brought out in opposition. In 1856 he was re-elected as Judge and at the conclusion of his second term he retired to private life and had since held no public office. In every position he held, he discharged the duties thereof actively, honestly, fearlessly and with ability. He was an authority with themes relating to geology, astronomy, anthropology and chemistry and he had pursued the study of Greek with such success he was able to read the New Testament in the original tongue. He was a delegate to the national convention which nominated Mr. Buchanan and in 1860 was a candidate for elector in support of the Breckenridge wing of democracy.

In all things he was a man among men. He was a firm believer in religious teachings and in early life united with the Presbyterian church of Greenwood and to his death had strongly adhered to that faith. His declining days were spent in the bosom of his family, loved and revered. He was the father of eight children.

[Submitted by Mark McCrady and Cathea Curry]

The Franklin Democrat, Friday, August 1, 1890 Volume XXXI, Number 6, page 3, column 3

Death of Judge Franklin Hardin.

Judge Franklin Hardin died at his home in White River Township, on Tuesday morning at six o'clock, after an illness of several days. The funeral, which was largely attended, took place from his late residence on Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock, the remains being interred in the cemetery at Glenn's Valley.

Judge Hardin was born July 27th, 1810, in Nicholas County, Ky. His family were of French descent. On the death of his father, October 5th, 1825, he studied surveying at Carlyle seminary, Ky., a knowledge that was very useful to Johnson County in later years. In 1825 when fifteen years of age, with his mother the family immigrated to White River Township on horseback. In his eighteenth year he began life as a school teacher, and in 1829 he entered into the study of law. Sickness caused him to desist, and upon his recovery he again entered the school room. In 1831 he returned to Kentucky where he married. In the fall of 1832 he moved to Johnson County and located the farm upon which he lived and died. A year's severe illness followed for he was far from being a robust youth and he was compelled to return to Kentucky. Returning in the fall of 1833 he was made assessor of White River Township. In the spring of 1836 he received the appointment of county surveyor from Judge Wick, which he held for six years, an office for which he was qualified in a high degree to fill.

Politics in the county had never cut much figure until about 1840 when the whig and democratic lines began to be closely drawn, and the year 1882 saw Judge Hardin in the political arena as the democratic nominee for representative to the legislature and without much opposition he was elected. In 1848 he was again nominated and elected, and in 1844 was again elected to the same office. In 1845 he was elected as State Senator and in 1849 was again elected to the same office. In 1850 he was elected a delegate to the constitutional convention, having the distinguished honor of being a State Senator and a delegate both at the same time. "Three years in the house and six in the senate, rounded off with a seat in the convention that changed the organic law of the land, was a line of honorable legislative service that has fallen to the lot of but a limited number throughout the state." On his return home, he was again made county surveyor in 1851 and held the office one year, when by an act of the legislature approved May 14, 1852, a new court, the common pleas, was organized, and Mr. Hardin was nominated and elected as Judge, defeating A. B. Hunter, of Franklin, who was brought out in opposition. In 1856 he was re-elected as Judge and at the conclusion of his second term he retired to private life and had since held no public office. In every position he held, he discharged the duties thereof actively, honestly, fearlessly and with ability. He was an authority with themes relating to geology, astronomy, anthropology and chemistry and he had pursued the study of Greek with such success he was able to read the New Testament in the original tongue. He was a delegate to the national convention which nominated Mr. Buchanan and in 1860 was a candidate for elector in support of the Breckenridge wing of democracy.

In all things he was a man among men. He was a firm believer in religious teachings and in early life united with the Presbyterian church of Greenwood and to his death had strongly adhered to that faith. His declining days were spent in the bosom of his family, loved and revered. He was the father of eight children.

[Submitted by Mark McCrady and Cathea Curry]


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  • Created by: PBMoubray
  • Added: 20 Jun 2011
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 71665892
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/71665892/franklin-hardin: accessed ), memorial page for Judge Franklin Hardin (27 Jul 1810–29 Jul 1890), Find a Grave Memorial ID 71665892, citing Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Greenwood, Johnson County, Indiana, USA; Maintained by PBMoubray (contributor 47139133).