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 Jean Giraudoux

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Jean Giraudoux

Birth
Bellac, Departement de la Haute-Vienne, Limousin, France
Death 31 Jan 1944 (aged 61)
Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
Burial Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
Plot Division 9.
Memorial ID 7158 View Source
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Playwright. Born Hippolyte Jean, he was the youngest son of Leggier and Anne. He attended the Lycée de Chateauroux, on full scholarship. He finished with a bachelor degree in philosophy and went on to École Normale Supérieure and obtained his license in letters from the Sorbonne in 1904. Obtaining another scholarship, he enrolled at the University of Munich in 1905, received his masters and visited Yale again on scholarship for six months. His first employment was on the editorial staff of Le Matin. In 1909, he published his first book "Provinciales." 1910 brought his entry into government service as vice consul of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs which provided the opportunity for extensive travel. Promoted in 1913, he also published "L'Ecole des indifferents" that year. He was assigned into the 29th Infantry Regiment at the outbreak of World War I. Wounded at Aisne, he would be awarded Knight of the Legion of Honor. After healing, he returned to the Foreign Affairs office. He would marry in 1921 to Suzanne Boland and have a son, Jean-Pierre. His novel in 1922, "Siegfried et le Limousin" won the Balzac prize. In 1927, he was assigned to Turkey where he lived for seven years. Much writing was done during this period, his novel, "Eglantine" and the first of his plays. While there he would meet Louis Jouvet who would direct many of his plays such as "Amphitryon 38" and "The Enchanted." A reoccurring theme in his plays would be the hostility between two sides or opposites for example man versus god or man versus woman. In 1933, he wrote "Intermezzo" which is one of the few works featuring an original story line. Giraudoux preferred to adapt characters and situations from the classics. He would continue to prosper in his job and in 1940 became President of the High Council for information but he retired in 1941. Other important works include "La Guerre de Troie n'aura pas lieu" 1935 also known as "Tiger at the Gates and "La Folle de Chaillot" in 1946, known as "The Madwoman of Chaillot. He also scripted several films. After the death of his mother, with whom he was living, his health also deteriorated and he died probably from pancreatitis.

Bio by: Winter Birds PA

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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Added: 27 Nov 1999
  • Find a Grave Memorial 7158
  • Find a Grave, database and images (www.findagrave.com/memorial/7158/jean-giraudoux : accessed ), memorial page for Jean Giraudoux (29 Oct 1882–31 Jan 1944), Find a Grave Memorial ID 7158, citing Cimetière de Passy, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave .