Advertisement

MAJ Frank John Bell

Advertisement

MAJ Frank John Bell

Birth
Ceres, Allegany County, New York, USA
Death
1 Apr 1894 (aged 57)
Washington, District of Columbia, District of Columbia, USA
Burial
McKean County, Pennsylvania, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
View Source
11. Major Frank Bell (1836-1894) was born the son of John Bell (1792-1874) and Jane King Bell (1796-1873).
__________________________________________________________

His siblings: 1. Francis King Bell (11/2/1819-1819), 2. Ely Welding Bell (11/9/1820-1900), 3. Capt. Horatio Bell (4/21/1822-), 4. Caroline Bell (9/9/1823-1906), 5. Mary S Bell (9/28/1825-), 6. Jane Ann Bell (9/6/1826-), 7. Wilson Peter Bell (1/8/1828-1910), 8. Robert Newton Bell (4/4/1830-1870), 9. Maria K Bell (11/4/1831/33-1859), 10. Margaretta Bell (1/29/1834-1850), 12. Hannah Bell Hackett (2/28/1838 - 1918) and 13. Rowland R. Bell (1844-). 14. Jennie Bell, and I'm not sure who 15. May Bell is (1828-) her birth date wasn't in other records. Plus, Jennie I'm wondering if Jane is Jennie and May is Mary???

Census 1855-so far I have these records (matching numbers above) to show proof of John & Jane Bell's children, the rest are from family records: Contributor Zoe Tom #47000374. 9 of the 15 are proven below.

John 1790
Jane 1796
15. May 1828
11. Francis 1836
12. Hannah E. 1838
13. Rowland R. 1844

From 4. Caroline's obit 1912-1916: She spent some years in Idaho where she kept house for her brother, 7. Wilson Bell...she was survived by another sister, Mrs. 14. Jennie Lodyard of San Jos, Cal.

Hannah's will: To Robert Bell, 10. Margarette
Bell Reed, 4. Caroline Bell Osborne,
Rollo R. Bell, heirs at law and next of kin
of Hannah E. Hackett. deceased,

1870...A letter from the U. S. Minister at ban Salvador announces the assassination in Honduras, in October last, of two citizens of Western New York—Dr. T, C. Ledyard and 8. Robert Newton Bell, at Ceres, Allegany county. Both were dentists and wore traveling professionally in Central America. They were murdered...

Ceres: 1906-1911, same town

3. Mr. Horatio Bell was home from... and They are
Capt. Horatio Bell, Major Frank Bell, Hero Blaum and Acil Wright, the latter a veteran of the war of 1812.
__________________________________________________________

He married Ruth Wheeler Bell (6/21/1837-6/1917), on March 2, 1864.

Their children were: Horatio Wheeler (1864-1869), Wheeler W. Bell (1867-) (sp. Rebecca Eleanor Ward Bell), Mrs. Smith " Fanny B. Bell" Parish (1871-) (sp. Smith parish), John D. Bell (1871-), and George H. Bell (1877-) (sp. Lulu Van Brunt), and

Horatio, drowned in the Oswayo Creek when he was five years old.

Father Frank wrote this about his little Boy
BOLIVAR BREEZE.
FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 1894.
My Dead.
By Major Frank Bell.
Over the mantel a group I see,
The faces of dear ones gone before,
A father and mother now waiting for me
On the other side of the Unknown Sea,
Which, we all must cross to return no more
A brother who fell 'mid the deadly strife
Of a battle field, as he led his men
Where the air was with hurtling missiles rife
And hand to hand was the struggle for life,
As our broken lines were restored again.
My little boy with his childish face
Looks down on me with his dark blue eyes
With his curling hair and boyish grace
He seems so near, as his form I trace
But, though often I question, he never replies.
I ask, does he find in that "Summer Land"
The forms of the dead so dear to me,
Does he sometimes come, hand linked in hand
With his little companions to walk the strand
To watch for my coming across the sea?
Does he learn? Does he grow? Will he meet me there
The same little boy that I used to know;
With his eager eyes and his golden hair,
With his clinging arms, and his face so fair
Who "loved me so well" in the "long ago."
In vain I ask! Like a prisoned bird
My spirit would fall be loosed and fly
To that far off land, where no more is heard
From restless spirit the questioning word.
Where all is "made plain" in "The By and By.

Note: this breaks my heart just with the loss of his dear son.

Major Bell, enlisted in the Civil War in 1861 and served until its close. After the close of the war Major and Mrs. Bell lived in Washington, D. C. until 1884, when Major Bell was appointed special pension examiner. His work took him to Kansas; Florida and Pennsylvania and Mrs. Bell and children, moved back to the old homestead, where she lived until the death of her husband in 1894.

News Tidbit: Sherman NY 1890
Major Frank Bell of Olean, special pension examiner, was In town Monday and Tuesday, looking up evidence in the cases of several claimants for pension.

An original poem. was rendered by Major Frank Bell, of Washington. It was descriptive of the battle of Gettysburg, and its spirited delivery won the applause of the large audience. Major Bell left a leg at Gettysburg, which fact added much to the interest felt in his poem.

By Major Frank Bell
Again we see the columns of the foe;
In serried ranks they come; the chargers prance
The sunbeams from the glittering bayonets glancing;
Behind our works we wait the impending blow.
Across the fields they come; once more the thunder
Breaks forth again upon the summer air:
The grape and shrapnel tear their ranks asunder.
The gaps are closed, we note with silent wonder,
They steady tread, the reckless debonair,
Aye! "tis a gallant night: the admiration
True Soldiers for a gallant foeman feel:
A moment stays our hands - the quick pulsation.
Of our own hearts Is heard; we know poor Nation
Has sent us foemen worthy of our steel!
Then crashing on the ear the volley firing
From right to left comes rolling down the line.
The clearing smoke reveals the foe retiring.
We greet the day as won— with cheer inspiring
Our wild hurrahs with sadd'ning tho'ts combine.
For comrades fallen we mourn; the dead and dying;
Are piled in heaps, and with the setting sun
Sets many a lite. The wounded 'round as lying
Require our aid: each lucky one is trying
To find his comrade brave whose "wore Is done "
Thus recollections of the past come tracing
On memory's tablets scenes of long ago.
And as we gather here, these garland placing
Upon our comrades' graves, let no debasing
Thought be expressed that we should he effacing
Our mem'ries of the brave here lying low,
No: Let us rather thank the God of Heaven
That when our land was nearly rent in twain—
When civil strife had hearts asunder riven.
We still had men whose lives were freely given,
Our nation and our Union to maintain.

APRIL 6, 1894. Bolivar Breeze
DEATH OF MAJOR FRARK BELL.

The Well Known Pension Examiner
Dies by His Own Hand in Washington.
Portville Special to the Breeze.

A brief dispatch received here from Washington, D. C, on Sunday announced the sudden death of Major Frank Bell. Later intelligence brought the particulars of his death, which resulted from a gun shot wound, inflicted by his own hand. Major Bell had been suffering from grip for some time and doubtless his reason was temporarily dethroned.
The body arrived here from Washington on Tuesday afternoon, and the funeral party was met at the depot by a large delegation of veterans, and escorted to the home of Mrs. C, A. Wheeler, a sister (in-law) of the deceased, where the body will lie in state until the arrival of Mrs. Bell and sons, who have been spending the winter in (he state of Washington. They left for the east on Monday evening and expect to reach here on Saturday, in which event the funeral will probably be held on Sunday.
Major Bell was about 60 years of age. He was a member of Col. Kane's famous Pennsylvania Bucktails and one of the bravest men of that brave band. He was a born soldier and his men idealized him. At the battle of Antietam he was shot
through the lungs, and the wound remained with him until the day of his death. At Gettysburg, while engaged
For many years be has been employed as a special pension examiner with headquarters at Washington. Col. Bell was a cultured man of decided literary tastes. He was a keen-and graceful writer and a few years ago contributed a series of war articles to the Century magazine. Col, Bell had a wide acquaintance in the eastern and middle states, and the
Sad news of his death will be learned with regret by all who knew him.

The late Major Frank Bell drew a pension of $72 per month. Mrs. Bell will now be entitled to a pension-of
$8 per month. " Bolivar Breeze 1895

Bolivar Breeze April 13, 1894
Funeral of Major Frank Bell~
From the Ceres Mail.
All that was mortal of the late Major Frank Bell was tenderly laid at rest in the Bell-King cemetery just below
Ceres on Monday afternoon.
Brief funeral services were held at the house conducted by Rev. J. W. Barnett, pastor of the M. E. Church, who paid deserved tribute to a brave soldier. H. W. Wessell's Post, G. A. R. acted as escort and conducted the services at the grave. The funeral procession was an unusually large one.
It is fitting that after the final battle was over, that the brave soldier should sleep in the shadow of his native hills, amid the scenes he loved the best.

Warsaw Western New Yorker 1984
—Major Frank Bell, for twenty-years an examiner in the pension bureau, committed suicide on April 1st, by shooting himself through the head. He was despondent at the time, owing to ill-health. Major Bell Was one of the best known officials in the bureau. He was 55 years of age, and left a wife and three children, whose home is in Cattaraugus,
county.

Bolivar Breeze 1895
—The graves of the soldiers buried in the Ceres and King cemeteries were decorated this- morning. The honored dead who rest in the Ceres cemetery are Bryce Kinney, Alanson Holly and Judson Clark. Four soldiers rest in the King cemetery. They are Capt. Horatio Bell, Major Frank Bell,
Hero Blaum and Acil Wright, the latter a veteran of the war of 1812.

—The late Major Frank Bell, whose death is noted in another column was well known in Bolivar, He was a member of Macedonia Lodge No. 258, F. & A. M. in good standing. A delegation of Bolivar Masons will probably attend the funeral which will be held at Portville on Sunday

Major Frank Bell committed suicide at Washington Saturday night He was employed in the; pension bureau. His home was in Portville, where he leaves a wife, three sons and a daughter.

Note: I think he bore a great deal of pain with losing his young son, the loss of his leg, being ill (lungs, grip, etc.), and probably depressed (PTSD), sadden him a great deal. He was obviously a man of strong feelings, you can see it in the poems he wrote. It just became too much.

As a Civil War Veteran there were many, many articles on him in many cities, too many for one site.

Note: he was titled as a Major and also as a Colonel. Even in his obit above he had both titles.

Thanks to Old Fulton NY Postcards, Sandy Skipper and Archives.
11. Major Frank Bell (1836-1894) was born the son of John Bell (1792-1874) and Jane King Bell (1796-1873).
__________________________________________________________

His siblings: 1. Francis King Bell (11/2/1819-1819), 2. Ely Welding Bell (11/9/1820-1900), 3. Capt. Horatio Bell (4/21/1822-), 4. Caroline Bell (9/9/1823-1906), 5. Mary S Bell (9/28/1825-), 6. Jane Ann Bell (9/6/1826-), 7. Wilson Peter Bell (1/8/1828-1910), 8. Robert Newton Bell (4/4/1830-1870), 9. Maria K Bell (11/4/1831/33-1859), 10. Margaretta Bell (1/29/1834-1850), 12. Hannah Bell Hackett (2/28/1838 - 1918) and 13. Rowland R. Bell (1844-). 14. Jennie Bell, and I'm not sure who 15. May Bell is (1828-) her birth date wasn't in other records. Plus, Jennie I'm wondering if Jane is Jennie and May is Mary???

Census 1855-so far I have these records (matching numbers above) to show proof of John & Jane Bell's children, the rest are from family records: Contributor Zoe Tom #47000374. 9 of the 15 are proven below.

John 1790
Jane 1796
15. May 1828
11. Francis 1836
12. Hannah E. 1838
13. Rowland R. 1844

From 4. Caroline's obit 1912-1916: She spent some years in Idaho where she kept house for her brother, 7. Wilson Bell...she was survived by another sister, Mrs. 14. Jennie Lodyard of San Jos, Cal.

Hannah's will: To Robert Bell, 10. Margarette
Bell Reed, 4. Caroline Bell Osborne,
Rollo R. Bell, heirs at law and next of kin
of Hannah E. Hackett. deceased,

1870...A letter from the U. S. Minister at ban Salvador announces the assassination in Honduras, in October last, of two citizens of Western New York—Dr. T, C. Ledyard and 8. Robert Newton Bell, at Ceres, Allegany county. Both were dentists and wore traveling professionally in Central America. They were murdered...

Ceres: 1906-1911, same town

3. Mr. Horatio Bell was home from... and They are
Capt. Horatio Bell, Major Frank Bell, Hero Blaum and Acil Wright, the latter a veteran of the war of 1812.
__________________________________________________________

He married Ruth Wheeler Bell (6/21/1837-6/1917), on March 2, 1864.

Their children were: Horatio Wheeler (1864-1869), Wheeler W. Bell (1867-) (sp. Rebecca Eleanor Ward Bell), Mrs. Smith " Fanny B. Bell" Parish (1871-) (sp. Smith parish), John D. Bell (1871-), and George H. Bell (1877-) (sp. Lulu Van Brunt), and

Horatio, drowned in the Oswayo Creek when he was five years old.

Father Frank wrote this about his little Boy
BOLIVAR BREEZE.
FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 1894.
My Dead.
By Major Frank Bell.
Over the mantel a group I see,
The faces of dear ones gone before,
A father and mother now waiting for me
On the other side of the Unknown Sea,
Which, we all must cross to return no more
A brother who fell 'mid the deadly strife
Of a battle field, as he led his men
Where the air was with hurtling missiles rife
And hand to hand was the struggle for life,
As our broken lines were restored again.
My little boy with his childish face
Looks down on me with his dark blue eyes
With his curling hair and boyish grace
He seems so near, as his form I trace
But, though often I question, he never replies.
I ask, does he find in that "Summer Land"
The forms of the dead so dear to me,
Does he sometimes come, hand linked in hand
With his little companions to walk the strand
To watch for my coming across the sea?
Does he learn? Does he grow? Will he meet me there
The same little boy that I used to know;
With his eager eyes and his golden hair,
With his clinging arms, and his face so fair
Who "loved me so well" in the "long ago."
In vain I ask! Like a prisoned bird
My spirit would fall be loosed and fly
To that far off land, where no more is heard
From restless spirit the questioning word.
Where all is "made plain" in "The By and By.

Note: this breaks my heart just with the loss of his dear son.

Major Bell, enlisted in the Civil War in 1861 and served until its close. After the close of the war Major and Mrs. Bell lived in Washington, D. C. until 1884, when Major Bell was appointed special pension examiner. His work took him to Kansas; Florida and Pennsylvania and Mrs. Bell and children, moved back to the old homestead, where she lived until the death of her husband in 1894.

News Tidbit: Sherman NY 1890
Major Frank Bell of Olean, special pension examiner, was In town Monday and Tuesday, looking up evidence in the cases of several claimants for pension.

An original poem. was rendered by Major Frank Bell, of Washington. It was descriptive of the battle of Gettysburg, and its spirited delivery won the applause of the large audience. Major Bell left a leg at Gettysburg, which fact added much to the interest felt in his poem.

By Major Frank Bell
Again we see the columns of the foe;
In serried ranks they come; the chargers prance
The sunbeams from the glittering bayonets glancing;
Behind our works we wait the impending blow.
Across the fields they come; once more the thunder
Breaks forth again upon the summer air:
The grape and shrapnel tear their ranks asunder.
The gaps are closed, we note with silent wonder,
They steady tread, the reckless debonair,
Aye! "tis a gallant night: the admiration
True Soldiers for a gallant foeman feel:
A moment stays our hands - the quick pulsation.
Of our own hearts Is heard; we know poor Nation
Has sent us foemen worthy of our steel!
Then crashing on the ear the volley firing
From right to left comes rolling down the line.
The clearing smoke reveals the foe retiring.
We greet the day as won— with cheer inspiring
Our wild hurrahs with sadd'ning tho'ts combine.
For comrades fallen we mourn; the dead and dying;
Are piled in heaps, and with the setting sun
Sets many a lite. The wounded 'round as lying
Require our aid: each lucky one is trying
To find his comrade brave whose "wore Is done "
Thus recollections of the past come tracing
On memory's tablets scenes of long ago.
And as we gather here, these garland placing
Upon our comrades' graves, let no debasing
Thought be expressed that we should he effacing
Our mem'ries of the brave here lying low,
No: Let us rather thank the God of Heaven
That when our land was nearly rent in twain—
When civil strife had hearts asunder riven.
We still had men whose lives were freely given,
Our nation and our Union to maintain.

APRIL 6, 1894. Bolivar Breeze
DEATH OF MAJOR FRARK BELL.

The Well Known Pension Examiner
Dies by His Own Hand in Washington.
Portville Special to the Breeze.

A brief dispatch received here from Washington, D. C, on Sunday announced the sudden death of Major Frank Bell. Later intelligence brought the particulars of his death, which resulted from a gun shot wound, inflicted by his own hand. Major Bell had been suffering from grip for some time and doubtless his reason was temporarily dethroned.
The body arrived here from Washington on Tuesday afternoon, and the funeral party was met at the depot by a large delegation of veterans, and escorted to the home of Mrs. C, A. Wheeler, a sister (in-law) of the deceased, where the body will lie in state until the arrival of Mrs. Bell and sons, who have been spending the winter in (he state of Washington. They left for the east on Monday evening and expect to reach here on Saturday, in which event the funeral will probably be held on Sunday.
Major Bell was about 60 years of age. He was a member of Col. Kane's famous Pennsylvania Bucktails and one of the bravest men of that brave band. He was a born soldier and his men idealized him. At the battle of Antietam he was shot
through the lungs, and the wound remained with him until the day of his death. At Gettysburg, while engaged
For many years be has been employed as a special pension examiner with headquarters at Washington. Col. Bell was a cultured man of decided literary tastes. He was a keen-and graceful writer and a few years ago contributed a series of war articles to the Century magazine. Col, Bell had a wide acquaintance in the eastern and middle states, and the
Sad news of his death will be learned with regret by all who knew him.

The late Major Frank Bell drew a pension of $72 per month. Mrs. Bell will now be entitled to a pension-of
$8 per month. " Bolivar Breeze 1895

Bolivar Breeze April 13, 1894
Funeral of Major Frank Bell~
From the Ceres Mail.
All that was mortal of the late Major Frank Bell was tenderly laid at rest in the Bell-King cemetery just below
Ceres on Monday afternoon.
Brief funeral services were held at the house conducted by Rev. J. W. Barnett, pastor of the M. E. Church, who paid deserved tribute to a brave soldier. H. W. Wessell's Post, G. A. R. acted as escort and conducted the services at the grave. The funeral procession was an unusually large one.
It is fitting that after the final battle was over, that the brave soldier should sleep in the shadow of his native hills, amid the scenes he loved the best.

Warsaw Western New Yorker 1984
—Major Frank Bell, for twenty-years an examiner in the pension bureau, committed suicide on April 1st, by shooting himself through the head. He was despondent at the time, owing to ill-health. Major Bell Was one of the best known officials in the bureau. He was 55 years of age, and left a wife and three children, whose home is in Cattaraugus,
county.

Bolivar Breeze 1895
—The graves of the soldiers buried in the Ceres and King cemeteries were decorated this- morning. The honored dead who rest in the Ceres cemetery are Bryce Kinney, Alanson Holly and Judson Clark. Four soldiers rest in the King cemetery. They are Capt. Horatio Bell, Major Frank Bell,
Hero Blaum and Acil Wright, the latter a veteran of the war of 1812.

—The late Major Frank Bell, whose death is noted in another column was well known in Bolivar, He was a member of Macedonia Lodge No. 258, F. & A. M. in good standing. A delegation of Bolivar Masons will probably attend the funeral which will be held at Portville on Sunday

Major Frank Bell committed suicide at Washington Saturday night He was employed in the; pension bureau. His home was in Portville, where he leaves a wife, three sons and a daughter.

Note: I think he bore a great deal of pain with losing his young son, the loss of his leg, being ill (lungs, grip, etc.), and probably depressed (PTSD), sadden him a great deal. He was obviously a man of strong feelings, you can see it in the poems he wrote. It just became too much.

As a Civil War Veteran there were many, many articles on him in many cities, too many for one site.

Note: he was titled as a Major and also as a Colonel. Even in his obit above he had both titles.

Thanks to Old Fulton NY Postcards, Sandy Skipper and Archives.


Advertisement