Advertisement

 Abraham “Abram” Enloe

Advertisement

Abraham “Abram” Enloe

Birth
USA
Death
1841 (aged 78–79)
Cherokee, Swain County, North Carolina, USA
Burial
Swain County, North Carolina, USA
Memorial ID
70761799 View Source

Abraham Enloe was among the earliest white settlers in the Oconaluftee area, although he did not arrive as early as even prominent writers have claimed. In Mountain Home, a publication of the Great Smoky Mountains Association, Wilma Dykeman and Jim Stokely assert:

"In 1803, Abraham Enloe and his family moved up from South Carolina...."

There is abundant evidence that Enloe did not arrive until after 1810. The property which he initially acquired was part of Felix Walker's 1798 NC land grant 501. The deed, dated February 20, 1807, was "between Felix Walker of the County of Rutherford and State of North Carolina of the one part and Abram Enloe of the same County and State." In 1807, the Oconaluftee area had been a part of Buncombe County since its formation in 1791, although this portion of the Lufty drainage remained in the Cherokee nation until the cession treaty of 1798. In 1808, it became part of the newly organized Haywood County.

According to the 1800 federal censuses, Enloe was in Rutherford County, and consistent with the 1807 deed from Walker, still in Rutherford County when the 1810 census was taken.

In deeds by which his children sold their interest to their sibling, Wesley Enloe, it was pointedly noted that the land being sold was "on both sides of Ocona Lufty River including the forks of the river being the plantation whereon Abram Enloe Dec'd died..."

This lends primary source support to the fact that early Lufty settler Abraham/Abram Enloe is, in fact, buried in the Enloe cemetery, where his grave overlooks the Enloe-Floyd Bottoms now occupied by the Oconaluftee Visitor Center.

▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬
children:
Scroop Enloe (1799 – 1885)
Margaret Mary Enloe Mingus (1804 – 1894)
Wesley Matthew Enloe (1811 – 1903)
William Watson Enloe (1815 – 1882)
Narcissa Enloe King (1820 – 1899)

Abraham Enloe was among the earliest white settlers in the Oconaluftee area, although he did not arrive as early as even prominent writers have claimed. In Mountain Home, a publication of the Great Smoky Mountains Association, Wilma Dykeman and Jim Stokely assert:

"In 1803, Abraham Enloe and his family moved up from South Carolina...."

There is abundant evidence that Enloe did not arrive until after 1810. The property which he initially acquired was part of Felix Walker's 1798 NC land grant 501. The deed, dated February 20, 1807, was "between Felix Walker of the County of Rutherford and State of North Carolina of the one part and Abram Enloe of the same County and State." In 1807, the Oconaluftee area had been a part of Buncombe County since its formation in 1791, although this portion of the Lufty drainage remained in the Cherokee nation until the cession treaty of 1798. In 1808, it became part of the newly organized Haywood County.

According to the 1800 federal censuses, Enloe was in Rutherford County, and consistent with the 1807 deed from Walker, still in Rutherford County when the 1810 census was taken.

In deeds by which his children sold their interest to their sibling, Wesley Enloe, it was pointedly noted that the land being sold was "on both sides of Ocona Lufty River including the forks of the river being the plantation whereon Abram Enloe Dec'd died..."

This lends primary source support to the fact that early Lufty settler Abraham/Abram Enloe is, in fact, buried in the Enloe cemetery, where his grave overlooks the Enloe-Floyd Bottoms now occupied by the Oconaluftee Visitor Center.

▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬
children:
Scroop Enloe (1799 – 1885)
Margaret Mary Enloe Mingus (1804 – 1894)
Wesley Matthew Enloe (1811 – 1903)
William Watson Enloe (1815 – 1882)
Narcissa Enloe King (1820 – 1899)


Family Members

Spouse

Flowers

In their memory
Plant Memorial Trees

Advertisement