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MAJ Henry James Hearsey

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MAJ Henry James Hearsey

Birth
West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana, USA
Death
30 Oct 1900 (aged 58)
Burial
New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, USA Add to Map
Plot
Section 92 - Hearsey tomb
Memorial ID
View Source
Major, Confederate Army, Civil War
Served as the Asst. Quartermaster of the 16th Mississippi and headstone indicates service in the 17th Mississippi Infantry; also served on staff as Asst. Q.M. for Gen. Nathaniel H. Harris.

"Major Henry J. Hearsey, the printer of the Convention, was born near Thomspon's Creek in the parish of West Feliciana on November 21, 1810.

He was educated in private academies at Bayou Sara, and St. Francisville. He read law for a short while in the office of Mr. C. B. Philips. Mr. Hearsey entered upon his journalistic career early in life; when but twenty years of age he established the "Feliciana Constitutionalist." but was shortly afterwards invited by the Democrats of Woodville, Miss., (then an important political centre in the state), to take charge of the Democratic organ there, the "Woodville Republican," and while editor of that paper, strongly urged the secession of the State of Mississippi.

When war was declared young Hearsey joined the Wilkinson Rifles, subsequently incorporated at Corinth, Mississippi in the Sixteenth Mississippi Regiment. He served as private and orderly sergeant as regimental and Brigate A.Q.M., and on the staff of Trinible, Featherstone, Posey and Harris.

Major Hearsey located in Shreveport in 1870 and revived the old "Shreveport News," subsequently with Capt. Jno. S. Lewis he started the "East Texas Bulletin" of Marshall, Texas. A little later, he established with Col. A. D. Battle, A. H. Leonard and Charles Lewis, "The Shreveport Times." He suggested the organizing of the White Men's party in 1874 and wrote the first articles in the "South," in favor of an open and aggressive revolt against negro domination and suffrage. That movement resulted in a great political victory in the Red River Valley over the combined opposition forces.

In 1876 the leaders of the Democratic Party in new Orleans, tendered him the editorship of the "New Orleans Democrat" which he accepted. He advocated the calling of the Constitutional Convention of 1879 and called for the repudiation of the Carpet Bag dept of the State. He established the 'Daily States" in January 1880 and has since guided its editorial helm. He has always been a strict State rights, tariff for revenue only, Democrat. Major Hearsey recalls with pride that he enjoyed in his early days, the friendship and personal regard of Judge C. Pinkney Smith. Chief Justice of Mississippi and of Jefferson Davis then United States Senator. He often recalls with pleasure the fact that the latter illustrious statesmen and patriot, only a few months before his death complemented him on his unshaken allusion to the principles on which the Southern Confederacy was founded."

Ref: The Convention of '98; published 1898 - in public domain (no copyright)
Major, Confederate Army, Civil War
Served as the Asst. Quartermaster of the 16th Mississippi and headstone indicates service in the 17th Mississippi Infantry; also served on staff as Asst. Q.M. for Gen. Nathaniel H. Harris.

"Major Henry J. Hearsey, the printer of the Convention, was born near Thomspon's Creek in the parish of West Feliciana on November 21, 1810.

He was educated in private academies at Bayou Sara, and St. Francisville. He read law for a short while in the office of Mr. C. B. Philips. Mr. Hearsey entered upon his journalistic career early in life; when but twenty years of age he established the "Feliciana Constitutionalist." but was shortly afterwards invited by the Democrats of Woodville, Miss., (then an important political centre in the state), to take charge of the Democratic organ there, the "Woodville Republican," and while editor of that paper, strongly urged the secession of the State of Mississippi.

When war was declared young Hearsey joined the Wilkinson Rifles, subsequently incorporated at Corinth, Mississippi in the Sixteenth Mississippi Regiment. He served as private and orderly sergeant as regimental and Brigate A.Q.M., and on the staff of Trinible, Featherstone, Posey and Harris.

Major Hearsey located in Shreveport in 1870 and revived the old "Shreveport News," subsequently with Capt. Jno. S. Lewis he started the "East Texas Bulletin" of Marshall, Texas. A little later, he established with Col. A. D. Battle, A. H. Leonard and Charles Lewis, "The Shreveport Times." He suggested the organizing of the White Men's party in 1874 and wrote the first articles in the "South," in favor of an open and aggressive revolt against negro domination and suffrage. That movement resulted in a great political victory in the Red River Valley over the combined opposition forces.

In 1876 the leaders of the Democratic Party in new Orleans, tendered him the editorship of the "New Orleans Democrat" which he accepted. He advocated the calling of the Constitutional Convention of 1879 and called for the repudiation of the Carpet Bag dept of the State. He established the 'Daily States" in January 1880 and has since guided its editorial helm. He has always been a strict State rights, tariff for revenue only, Democrat. Major Hearsey recalls with pride that he enjoyed in his early days, the friendship and personal regard of Judge C. Pinkney Smith. Chief Justice of Mississippi and of Jefferson Davis then United States Senator. He often recalls with pleasure the fact that the latter illustrious statesmen and patriot, only a few months before his death complemented him on his unshaken allusion to the principles on which the Southern Confederacy was founded."

Ref: The Convention of '98; published 1898 - in public domain (no copyright)


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