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 Harry Alonzo “Sundance Kid” Longabaugh

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Harry Alonzo “Sundance Kid” Longabaugh

  • Birth 1867 Mont Clare, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, USA
  • Death 7 Nov 1908 Bolivia
  • Burial Body lost or destroyed
  • Memorial ID 70569444

Outlaw, Folk Figure. Harry Alonzo Longabaugh better known as the Sundance Kid, was an outlaw and member of Butch Cassidy's Wild Bunch, in the American Old West. Longabaugh likely met Butch Cassidy (real name Robert Leroy Parker) after Parker was released from prison around 1896. Together with the other members of "The Wild Bunch" gang, they performed the longest string of successful train and bank robberies in American history. The facts concerning Longabaugh's death are not known for certain. On November 3, 1908, near San Vicente in southern Bolivia, a courier for the Aramayo Franke y Cia Silver Mine was conveying his company's payroll, worth about 15,000 Bolivian pesos, by mule when he was attacked and robbed by two masked American bandits who were believed to be Longabaugh and Parker. The bandits then proceeded to the small mining town of San Vicente where they lodged in a small boarding house owned by a local miner named Bonifacio Casasola. When Casasola became suspicious of his two foreign lodgers (a mule they had in their possession was from the Aramayo Mine, and was identifiable because of the mine company logo on the mule's left flank) Casasola left his house and informed a nearby telegraph officer who notified a small Bolivian Army cavalry unit (the Abaroa Regiment) stationed nearby. The unit dispatched three soldiers, under the command of Captain Justa Concha, to San Vicente where they notified the local authorities. On the evening of 6 November, the lodging house was surrounded by a small group consisting of the local mayor and a number of his officials, along with the three soldiers from the Abaroa Regiment. When the three soldiers approached the house where the two bandits were staying, the bandits opened fire, killing one of the soldiers and wounding another. A gunfight then ensued. At around 2 a.m., during a lull in the firing, the police and soldiers heard a man screaming from inside the house. Soon, a single shot was heard from inside the house, after which the screaming stopped. Minutes later, another shot was heard. The standoff continued as locals kept the place surrounded until the next morning when, cautiously entering, they found two dead bodies, both with numerous bullet wounds to the arms and legs. One of the men had a bullet wound in the forehead and the other had a bullet hole in the temple. The local police report speculated that, judging from the positions of the bodies, one bandit had probably shot his fatally wounded partner-in-crime to put him out of his misery, just before killing himself with his final bullet. In the following investigation by the Tupiza police, the bandits were identified as the men who robbed the Aramayo payroll transport, but the Bolivian authorties did not know their real names, nor could they positively identify them. The bodies were buried at the small San Vicente cemetery, where they were buried close to the grave of a German miner named Gustav Zimmer. Although attempts have been made to find their unmarked graves, notably by the American forensic anthropologist Clyde Snow and his researchers in 1991, no remains with DNA matching the living relatives of Parker and Longabaugh have been discovered. This uncertainty has led to many claims that one or both survived and eventually returned to the United States. One of these claims was that Longabaugh lived under the name of William Henry Long in the small town of Duchesne, Utah. Long died in 1936 and was buried in the town cemetery. His remains were exhumed in December 2008, and testing was performed to determine whether he was Harry Longabaugh, but the results did not support the William Long theory.


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  • Maintained by: Find A Grave
  • Originally Created by: Papawraith
  • Added: 29 May 2011
  • Find A Grave Memorial 70569444
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Harry Alonzo “Sundance Kid” Longabaugh (1867–7 Nov 1908), Find A Grave Memorial no. 70569444, ; Maintained by Find A Grave Body lost or destroyed.