2LT Jerome Ticknor Furman

2LT Jerome Ticknor Furman

Birth
Mehoopany, Wyoming County, Pennsylvania, USA
Death 26 Aug 1865 (aged 25)
Walhalla, Oconee County, South Carolina, USA
Burial Tunkhannock, Wyoming County, Pennsylvania, USA
Memorial ID 70402685 · View Source
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Lieutenant JEROME TICKNOR FURMAN, Co B, 52nd Reg PA Vol & Co. D, 1st South Carolina Volunteer Infantry, later known as the 33rd United States Colored Troops

(The marker for 2nd Lieutenant Jerome Ticknor Furman located in this cemetery is actually a cenotaph. His mortal remains are known to lie in an unmarked grave in Walhalla, South Carolina, possibly in the Saint Johns Evangelical Lutheran Church Cemetery, where he was murdered by Manson Sherrill "Manse" Jolly. Manse Jolly was a native of South Carolina and enlisted in the Confederate army along with six brothers. Five of them were left dead on the field of battle. Manse made a promise to kill five Yankees for each brother lost. Manse is believed to have murdered as many as 23 union soldiers after the war was over, before things got to hot and he headed for Texas. Manse and his horse drowned on July 8, 1869 while crossing a creek that feds into the Red River. The Body of Manse Jolly lies in the Little River Cemetery in Jones Prairie Township, Milam County, Texas. See his Find A Grave Memorial #7798336.)

Lt. Jerome Ticknor Furman was born c. June 1, 1840 in or near Mehoopany in Wyoming County, Pennsylavnia. He is believed to have been the son of Allen Foster Furman and Jerusha Ann (Ticknor) Furman.

This is the way the family appears in the 1850 census in Mehoopany, Wyoming County, Pennsylvania;
Allen Firman M 38 New York
Genicea Firman F 34 New York
Foster Firman M 18 Pennsylvania
Silvester Firman M 14 Pennsylvania
Judson Firman M 12 Pennsylvania
Granville Firman M 8 Pennsylvania
Edgar Firman M 6 Pennsylvania
Edwin Firman M 6 Pennsylvania
Emiline Firman F 4 Pennsylvania
Melissa Firman F 4 Pennsylvania
Julia Firman F 1 Pennsylvania

This is the way the family appears in the 1860 census in Mehoopany, Wyoming County, Pennsylvania;
Allen F Furman M 49 New York
Jerusha Furman F 47 New York
Graniel Furman M 18 Pennsylvania
Emeline Furman F 13 Pennsylvania
Louisa Furman F 13 Pennsylvania
Edgar Furman M 15 Pennsylvania
Edwin Furman M 15 Pennsylvania
Julia Furman F 11 Pennsylvania
Horace Furman M 9 Pennsylvania
Wilmat Furman M 5 Pennsylvania

Jerome Ticknor Furman first served as a Sergeant on Co. B of the 52nd Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry from October 1861 until August 1863, when he was granted his discharge to accept a commission as a 2nd Lieutenant in the first negro regiment, Co. D of the 1st South Carolina Volunteers, later the 33rd Regiment of United State Colored Troops. 2nd Lt. Jerome Ticknor Furman served in this regiment for the remainder of the war and was murdered on 26th August 1865 at the age of 25.
Although he was buried in Walhalla, South Carolina, a memorial stone was placed by the family in Sunnyside Cemetery, Tunkhannock, Wyoming County, Pennsylvania, where his parents are buried.

Jerome T. Furman was murdered, shot in the back by Manson Sherrill "Manse" Jolly, on the front porch or near the steps of the principal hotel of Wall Hollow/Walhalla, South Carolina in August of 1865, four months after the end of the Civil War. In October of 1904, Lt. Col. Charles Tyler Trowbridge gave an address about his days in the 33rd United State Colored Troops. The following is part of the that address and gives some of the details of the murder and circumstances surrounding the death of 2nd Lieutenant Jerome Ticknor Furman;
"Within a day or two after my arrival at Anderson (South Carolina) I received a request to send a company of men to Walhalla, some forty miles north, as there was much lawlessness and confusion in the place. I at once ordered Capt. Parker with his company in connection with Lieut. Jerome B. Furman to march to that point. From information I had of the character of the people, I was most careful to instruct the officers to exercise great watchfulness for a few days and not expose themselves or their men, but to keep quietly in their quarters and to feel their way, trusting no man who might call on them unless it be the mayor or city councilmen. They reached the town partly by marching and partly by using as much of the Railroad as had been repaired. They took up their quarters in the principal hotel and set to work making themselves as comfortable as possible. As night came on and the evening meal was over, Lieut. Furman stepped out on the front porch when a tall, villainous looking ex-Confederate came up, bade him good-evening, and said: "We are glad to have you come into our town for we are absolutely without any kind of government. The town is full of desperate characters; we are living in constant fear of our lives and the presence of United States troops will no doubt soon restore order and be a blessing to us." His mode of speech and cordial manner threw the officer completely off his guard and he foolishly accepted an invitation to take a walk with his newly made acquaintance. They had only walked a few steps before the villain drew his revolver, shot the officer in the back, and as he fell, put the muzzle of his pistol to the head of the dying man and discharged two more bullets into his brain, and then disappeared into the darkness. I was at once sent for with a request to bring more troops. I immediately started with another company as fast as the cars would carry me.
Upon my arrival in the town I sent for the mayor, took him into the room where the body of the Lieutenant lay and said to him: "As this officer has been murdered I shall hold you responsible for his death, giving you ten hours to produce the murderer, or I will burn the town." I instructed him to go to the town hall, ring the bell, call the people together and state to them what I had told him. This he rather reluctantly complied with and in a few hours returned, saying that the people knew the man, but he was such a desperado that it was worth more than the value of any man's life to reveal it. I persisted until he gave me the name of the man. I then offered a reward of $2000 for his body dead or alive. I got the citizens to post the notice of the reward in all parts of the town. This action compelled the people to rely on me for protection from this notorious outlaw. They were from that moment, whether willingly or not, very friendly to me. At the funeral of my dead comrade, which was held the next day, the entire community turned out and I have never seen more flowers or more genuine expressions of sorrow than I witnessed at the burial of this gallant young officer who was laid in his last resting place at the foot of the mountain where he sleeps in an unmarked grave and is the only Union soldier that I know of in that faraway southern village. We knew nothing of his relatives, who were supposed to reside in Pennsylvania. I believe his accounts have never been settled with the government to this day. Being satisfied in my own mind from what I had gathered during the (lay that the man I was looking for was not in that town, and finding the people willing to assist me in any way in their power to capture the perpetrator of this foul deed, I took a locomotive and returned to my headquarters at Anderson, leaving instructions that any information that might come in should be forwarded to me at once. This was on Thursday and on the next day a courier arrived saying that the man we wanted would be at church on Sunday at a little meeting house about twelve miles from Anderson. A description of a roan horse that he was riding when he was last seen was given. I at once dispatched Lieutenant Searles with nine mounted men and instructed him to secrete his men and horses in a cornfield that I had been told was very near the church. So as soon as darkness came on he moved with great care, got his men in hiding and in the afternoon of Sunday the roan horse and his rider appeared. The horse was tied to a fence and as soon as the man entered the church a dash was made for the horse which being secured they made for the door of the church to capture the rider. He, however, being on the alert jumped out of a window and made his escape into the cornfield where all track of him was soon lost and the Lieutenant and his men returned to Anderson with the captured horse. That night, just after midnight, I heard the sound of horsemen in the street under my window and shortly a sound of footsteps in the hallway leading to my room was heard as if someone was coming in their bare feet. As soon as the person came to the door I found it to be an old colored woman who said in a low tone: "Don't go out of this room tonight for Mance Jolly is out there to kill you." She then disappeared as mysteriously as she had come. A moment later I heard the tramp of three men approaching from the other end of the hallway. These three I took to be the party who were looking for me, so I determined to give them a warm reception. Planting myself in front of the door of my room I listened for them to make a demand upon me to open the door when I would shoot through the panel. To my great joy it turned out to be three of my own officers who had been warned by the same old colored woman of my danger, and' had come to caution me not to expose myself at the window for they would shoot me on sight from the street. Very soon, the alarm the woman had given reaching the Provost guardhouse, the guard came on the double-quick and the rebels hastily rode out of town. Next morning I had an engagement to meet the colored people on a plantation about three miles out of town for the purpose of arranging a contract between them and a Mr. Crawford Keyes, who had been their former owner, as to the wages he was to pay them, and requiring the Negroes to remain for a year in his employ. I was told by a number of people not to go alone as Jolly would most likely be looking for me. I determined to take with me a man who had been sheriff at Anderson County and was now a wounded ex-Confederate soldier, by the name of Magee, who knew everybody in that country. He at first declined to go with me saying that undoubtedly Jolly was hiding near the town and as he was such a desperate character he would kill me as sure as he saw me. I insisted and he at last very reluctantly accompanied me. The weather was terribly hot so we started off early in the morning met the people, made the contract and returned to town. After I had my breakfast I stepped out on the porch, leaving my pistol in my room, when up rode Jolly to the edge of the sidewalk, saying: "My name is Mance Jolly, the man you are looking for, now take me if you can." Then striking spurs to his horse he rode away.
A few days later I visited another plantation of colored people and there witnessed one of the most revolting effects of the accursed institution of slavery that I have ever witnessed. The master called his slaves; about three hundred in number, up in line before the plantation house. When I asked him if his people were all present he replied: "There is one more in the house, I will get her out." Stepping inside the door he soon returned dragging by the hand a lovely, delicate girl about nineteen years old as white as any woman I ever saw. He roughly ordered her to take her place in line and as she passed by where I was standing said: "Father, I never knew that I was a nigger before." I said to this wretch that we called a man, "Is that your child?" His reply was: "She is one of those house niggers." I finished my duties on that plantation with all possible haste, leaving this human monster and his wretched people with feelings of indescribable disgust and utter loathing for a man who had become so degraded as to be guilty of such inhuman conduct, and longing for my term, of service in this horrible place to end. Next morning, just as the guard had been mounted for the day, and the men whose duty it was to remain at the guard-house had stacked arms, Jolly rode up alone to the guard, saying: "Tell your Colonel that unless he delivers my horse that his Men stole from me at the meeting house on Sunday, I will kill him and every man in his regiment before they get out of this country." He wheeled his horse and rode away. The Sergeant of the guard commanded his men to take their guns and fire. Jolly lay over on the neck of his horse, which was running at full speed, the man after him, keeping up the fusillade until he was out of town. The horse was wounded and soon died but the rider escaped."


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  • Maintained by: Baxter B. Fite III
  • Originally Created by: A M P
  • Added: 26 May 2011
  • Find A Grave Memorial 70402685
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for 2LT Jerome Ticknor Furman (1 Jun 1840–26 Aug 1865), Find A Grave Memorial no. 70402685, citing Sunnyside Cemetery, Tunkhannock, Wyoming County, Pennsylvania, USA ; Maintained by Baxter B. Fite III (contributor 47203738) .