Advertisement

 Thomas Mann

Advertisement

Thomas Mann Famous memorial

Birth
Lübeck, Stadtkreis Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
Death
12 Aug 1955 (aged 80)
Zürich, Bezirk Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland
Burial
Kilchberg, Bezirk Horgen, Zürich, Switzerland
Memorial ID
7029 View Source

Nobel Prize Recipient. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1929. When his father died in 1891, the family moved to Munich. Mann was educated at the Lübeck Gymnasium and he also spent some time at the University of Munich. His career as a writer started in the magazine "Simplicissimus." His first book was published in 1898. During these years, Mann became immersed in the writings of the philosophers Arthur Schopenhauer and Friedrich Nietzsche as well as in the music of composer Richard Wagner. "Buddenbrooks" was his early masterpiece. After "Buddenbrooks," Mann concentrated on short novels. "Death in Venice," his famous novel, was inspired by a young, sailor-suited boy whom the author saw in Venice in 1911. After ten years of work, Mann completed his second major work in 1924, "The Magic Mountain," a novel about ideas and of lost Humanism. His next major work was the trilogy "Joseph and his Brother." Upon Adolph Hitler's accession with the Nazi Party, Mann moved to Switzerland, where he edited the literary journal "Mass und Wert." He settled finally in the United States in 1936, where he worked among others at the University of Princeton. In 1941, he moved to Santa Monica, California. Mann lived in the United States for ten years, but was disappointed with the American persecution of Communist sympathizers. Mann's last great work was "Doctor Faustus" in 1947. In 1947, Mann returned to Europe. Demonstratively, he avoided Germany and lived mostly in Switzerland, near Zurich, where he died. His novel "Confessions of Felix Krull" was left unfinished.

Nobel Prize Recipient. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1929. When his father died in 1891, the family moved to Munich. Mann was educated at the Lübeck Gymnasium and he also spent some time at the University of Munich. His career as a writer started in the magazine "Simplicissimus." His first book was published in 1898. During these years, Mann became immersed in the writings of the philosophers Arthur Schopenhauer and Friedrich Nietzsche as well as in the music of composer Richard Wagner. "Buddenbrooks" was his early masterpiece. After "Buddenbrooks," Mann concentrated on short novels. "Death in Venice," his famous novel, was inspired by a young, sailor-suited boy whom the author saw in Venice in 1911. After ten years of work, Mann completed his second major work in 1924, "The Magic Mountain," a novel about ideas and of lost Humanism. His next major work was the trilogy "Joseph and his Brother." Upon Adolph Hitler's accession with the Nazi Party, Mann moved to Switzerland, where he edited the literary journal "Mass und Wert." He settled finally in the United States in 1936, where he worked among others at the University of Princeton. In 1941, he moved to Santa Monica, California. Mann lived in the United States for ten years, but was disappointed with the American persecution of Communist sympathizers. Mann's last great work was "Doctor Faustus" in 1947. In 1947, Mann returned to Europe. Demonstratively, he avoided Germany and lived mostly in Switzerland, near Zurich, where he died. His novel "Confessions of Felix Krull" was left unfinished.

Bio by: Jelena


Family Members

Siblings

Flowers

In their memory
Plant Memorial Trees

Advertisement

  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Added: 19 Nov 1999
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 7029
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/7029/thomas-mann: accessed ), memorial page for Thomas Mann (6 Jun 1875–12 Aug 1955), Find a Grave Memorial ID 7029, citing Friedhof Kilchberg, Kilchberg, Bezirk Horgen, Zürich, Switzerland; Maintained by Find a Grave.