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 Wolfgang Pauli

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Wolfgang Pauli Famous memorial

Birth
Vienna, Wien Stadt, Vienna (Wien), Austria
Death
15 Dec 1958 (aged 58)
Zürich, Switzerland
Burial
Zollikon, Bezirk Meilen, Zürich, Switzerland
Memorial ID
70254842 View Source

Nobel Prize in Physics Recipient. Wolfgang Pauli received world-wide recognition as an Austrian theoretical physicist receiving the Nobel Prize in 1945 for his discovery of the 1925 "Pauli Exclusion Principle." Born into one of the most intelligent families in Austria, his father was a physician and his godfather, Ernst Mach was an Austrian physicist and philosopher, who baptized Pauli with the love of science. He began his education in Vienna before studying at the University of Munich in Germany under pioneer atomic scientist, Arnold Sommerfeld, earning his doctorate degree in 1921. Recognized as a brilliant student as a teenager, he published in 1921 as a young college student, a masterly exposition of the theory of relativity in the "Encyclopedia of Mathematical Sciences," which gained him fame and high praise from many seasoned scientists including Albert Einstein. He spent a year at the University of Göttingen in Germany as assistant to Max Born, recipient of the Nobel Prize in 1954, and a further year was spent with the recipient of the 1922 Nobel Prize, Niels Bohr in Copenhagen, Denmark. Returning to Germany from 1923 to 1928, he was a lecturer at the University of Hamburg before his appointment as Professor of Theoretical Physics at the Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland. After a failed marriage at a young age, which caused him to lose his focus on research, he married for a second time to Franciska Bertram on April 4, 1934. During 1935 to 1936, he was the Visiting Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, and he had similar appointments at the University of Michigan from 1931 to 1941 and Purdue University in Indiana in 1942. He was elected to the Chair of Theoretical Physics at Princeton University in New Jersey in 1940. Since both his parents were of Jewish ancestry, he sought refuge in the United States during World War II. After the war in 1946, he became a naturalized citizen of the United States, but then returned to Zürich, where he remained as a resident for the rest of his life. According the Nobel Prize Committee's published biography, the Pauli Exclusion Principle "crystallized the existing knowledge of atomic structure at the time it was postulated, which led to the recognition of the two-valued variable required to characterize the state of an electron. He was the first to recognize the existence of the neutrino, an uncharged and massless particle which carries off energy in radioactive ß-disintegration." All of this was discovered in Zurich prior to World War II. In 1945 he collaborated with others to lay the foundations of the quantum theory of fields, and he participated actively in the great advances made in this domain. Earlier, he had further consolidated field theory by giving proof of the relationship between spin and "statistics" of elementary particles. Besides being published in scientific journals world-wide, his "Theory of Relativity" appears in the 1920 "Encyclopedia of Mathematical Sciences," Volume 5, Part 2; his "Quantum Theory" in the 1926 "Handbook of Physics," Vol. 23; and his "Principles of Wave Mechanics" in the 1933 "Handbook of Physics," Vol. 24. Besides the Nobel Prize, he received the Lorentz Medal in 1930 and shortly before his death in 1958, he was awarded the Max Planck Medal. He was elected a Foreign Member of the Royal Society of London in 1953, the Swiss Physical Society, the American Physical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Nobel Prize in Physics Recipient. Wolfgang Pauli received world-wide recognition as an Austrian theoretical physicist receiving the Nobel Prize in 1945 for his discovery of the 1925 "Pauli Exclusion Principle." Born into one of the most intelligent families in Austria, his father was a physician and his godfather, Ernst Mach was an Austrian physicist and philosopher, who baptized Pauli with the love of science. He began his education in Vienna before studying at the University of Munich in Germany under pioneer atomic scientist, Arnold Sommerfeld, earning his doctorate degree in 1921. Recognized as a brilliant student as a teenager, he published in 1921 as a young college student, a masterly exposition of the theory of relativity in the "Encyclopedia of Mathematical Sciences," which gained him fame and high praise from many seasoned scientists including Albert Einstein. He spent a year at the University of Göttingen in Germany as assistant to Max Born, recipient of the Nobel Prize in 1954, and a further year was spent with the recipient of the 1922 Nobel Prize, Niels Bohr in Copenhagen, Denmark. Returning to Germany from 1923 to 1928, he was a lecturer at the University of Hamburg before his appointment as Professor of Theoretical Physics at the Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland. After a failed marriage at a young age, which caused him to lose his focus on research, he married for a second time to Franciska Bertram on April 4, 1934. During 1935 to 1936, he was the Visiting Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, and he had similar appointments at the University of Michigan from 1931 to 1941 and Purdue University in Indiana in 1942. He was elected to the Chair of Theoretical Physics at Princeton University in New Jersey in 1940. Since both his parents were of Jewish ancestry, he sought refuge in the United States during World War II. After the war in 1946, he became a naturalized citizen of the United States, but then returned to Zürich, where he remained as a resident for the rest of his life. According the Nobel Prize Committee's published biography, the Pauli Exclusion Principle "crystallized the existing knowledge of atomic structure at the time it was postulated, which led to the recognition of the two-valued variable required to characterize the state of an electron. He was the first to recognize the existence of the neutrino, an uncharged and massless particle which carries off energy in radioactive ß-disintegration." All of this was discovered in Zurich prior to World War II. In 1945 he collaborated with others to lay the foundations of the quantum theory of fields, and he participated actively in the great advances made in this domain. Earlier, he had further consolidated field theory by giving proof of the relationship between spin and "statistics" of elementary particles. Besides being published in scientific journals world-wide, his "Theory of Relativity" appears in the 1920 "Encyclopedia of Mathematical Sciences," Volume 5, Part 2; his "Quantum Theory" in the 1926 "Handbook of Physics," Vol. 23; and his "Principles of Wave Mechanics" in the 1933 "Handbook of Physics," Vol. 24. Besides the Nobel Prize, he received the Lorentz Medal in 1930 and shortly before his death in 1958, he was awarded the Max Planck Medal. He was elected a Foreign Member of the Royal Society of London in 1953, the Swiss Physical Society, the American Physical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Bio by: Linda Davis

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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: Rik Van Beveren
  • Added: 22 May 2011
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 70254842
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/70254842/wolfgang-pauli: accessed ), memorial page for Wolfgang Pauli (25 Apr 1900–15 Dec 1958), Find a Grave Memorial ID 70254842, citing Friedhof Zollikon, Zollikon, Bezirk Meilen, Zürich, Switzerland; Maintained by Find a Grave .