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 George John Beto

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George John Beto

Birth
Hysham, Treasure County, Montana, USA
Death
4 Dec 1991 (aged 75)
Austin, Travis County, Texas, USA
Burial
Austin, Travis County, Texas, USA
Plot
Section: Republic Hill, Section 1 (C1) Row:D Number: 1
Memorial ID
70231415 View Source

George John Beto, criminal-justice expert, teacher, and Lutheran minister, was born in Hysham, Montana, on January 19, 1916, the son of Margaret (Witsma) and Louis Beto, a circuit riding Lutheran minister.

He taught history at Concordia Lutheran College in Austin, Texas, and served as the college's president. Beto was ordained a minister of the Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod) at St. Paul's Church in Austin in 1944. He earned a master of arts degree in medieval history from the University of Texas, and in 1955 he completed a Ph.D. in educational administration at UT.

Beto began a lengthy involvement with criminal justice when in 1953 Governor Allan Shivers appointed him to the Texas Prison Board (renamed Texas Board of Corrections in 1957). Until July 1959 Beto served on the administrative agency of the Texas prison system, performing the duties of board secretary for three of those years. president of Concordia Theological Seminary at Springfield, Illinois, on July 1, 1959. He remained in that position until 1962.

After the death of Oscar Byron Ellis in November 1961, Beto became director and chief of chaplains for the Texas Department of Corrections, on March 1, 1962; he held those positions through August 31, 1972. Prisoners often called him "Walking George" because he unexpectedly visited inmates and employees at the various prison properties. . . .

He and his wife, the former Marilyn Knippa, whom he married on March 5, 1943, were the parents of four children. Following his retirement from Sam Houston State University in 1991, Beto moved to Austin, where he served as chief of chaplains for the Texas Youth Commission from September until he died of an apparent heart attack on December 4 of that year. He was buried in the State Cemetery in Austin. [bio info from tshaonline.org]
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George John Beto, criminal-justice expert, teacher, and Lutheran minister, was born in Hysham, Montana, on January 19, 1916, the son of Margaret (Witsma) and Louis Beto, a circuit riding Lutheran minister.

He taught history at Concordia Lutheran College in Austin, Texas, and served as the college's president. Beto was ordained a minister of the Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod) at St. Paul's Church in Austin in 1944. He earned a master of arts degree in medieval history from the University of Texas, and in 1955 he completed a Ph.D. in educational administration at UT.

Beto began a lengthy involvement with criminal justice when in 1953 Governor Allan Shivers appointed him to the Texas Prison Board (renamed Texas Board of Corrections in 1957). Until July 1959 Beto served on the administrative agency of the Texas prison system, performing the duties of board secretary for three of those years. president of Concordia Theological Seminary at Springfield, Illinois, on July 1, 1959. He remained in that position until 1962.

After the death of Oscar Byron Ellis in November 1961, Beto became director and chief of chaplains for the Texas Department of Corrections, on March 1, 1962; he held those positions through August 31, 1972. Prisoners often called him "Walking George" because he unexpectedly visited inmates and employees at the various prison properties. . . .

He and his wife, the former Marilyn Knippa, whom he married on March 5, 1943, were the parents of four children. Following his retirement from Sam Houston State University in 1991, Beto moved to Austin, where he served as chief of chaplains for the Texas Youth Commission from September until he died of an apparent heart attack on December 4 of that year. He was buried in the State Cemetery in Austin. [bio info from tshaonline.org]
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