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 Elizabeth Smith Lovell

Elizabeth Smith Lovell

Birth
Essex, England
Death 27 Feb 1889 (aged 82)
Oak City, Millard County, Utah, USA
Burial Oak City, Millard County, Utah, USA
Plot A-4-7
Memorial ID 69314 · View Source
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Elizabeth Smith Lovell had no children.

Elizabeth Smith was the daughter of John Smith and Ann Smith. Ann Smith was the daughter of Robert and Rosamond Smith of Barking, Essex, England. John was from Buckinghamshire, England; his family is unknown. John and Ann had seven daughters and two sons.

Elizabeth was born 10 March 1806 in Barkingside, Essex, England, a rural community on the outskirts of London.
Elizabeth's father was a laborer working on vegetable farms but his children did have the opportunity of some education, which many rural children did not have.
Elizabeth learned to read and write. Everyone in London had to work, even women and children to pay the high prices demanded. Many women worked in factories twelve to fifteen hours a day. One of the most sought-after jobs was to work as a maid in homes of the wealthy. The work was hard and long hours, but the houses were clean and free from disease, but because so many women wanted these jobs they were hard to find. In 1841 Elizabeth was working for Clement Hue, a physician. What kind of work she did and how long she worked there is not known.

As early as 1848 Elizabeth and others of her family became involved with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, though they were not baptized until later. Her sister Charlotte was the first to be baptized on 2 April 1849. Her husband William Cooper was baptized on 4 September 1849. Elizabeth was baptized 13 November 1849 by Elder Sutherland, just seven weeks before she left England to join with the Saints in Zion.1 Before her baptism Elizabeth began making plans to immigrate to Zion along with her sister Charlotte, her husband William Cooper and their two children. As a single woman Elizabeth was not allowed to travel alone, if she didn't have a family, she would be assigned one. It was hard for Elizabeth to leave her home, family and friends. She was frightened of what the future held, but she knew she had to make this journey, there was something waiting for her on the other side of the ocean.

Elizabeth found life on the emigrant ships far from pleasant. The berths in steerage were small and crowded. The bunks were stacked two or three high with two to three feet or less between tiers. Food rations were often skimpy and lacked basic nutrients for survival. Wise emigrants would bring their own rations to supplement the ship's stores, but many did not know or could not afford to do this so many went hungry. Drinking water was provided but by the end of the journey the water was often bad. Vinegar was used to dilute the taste and smell of bad water.
Lack of privacy was also a problem. Elizabeth and her traveling companions looked forward with great anticipation to the end of the journey.

The "Argo" docked in New Orleans 8 March 1851, eight weeks and three days after the ship left Liverpool, England. The immigrants started up the Mississippi on 12 March with Captain Van Dosen as the master of the "Uncle Sam." It took fourteen days for "Uncle Sam" to reach St. Louis. The time was spent in singing, dancing and gospel discussions.
The immigrants stayed in St. Louis for three days then transferred to another paddle-wheeled steam boat, the "Sacramento," for the journey up the Missouri River. After leaving Brunswick it was another twenty days before the boat arrived at Kanesville, Iowa, early in May. Elizabeth stayed in Kanesville for two more years, her delay allowed her to meet John and Ann Lovell.


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  • Maintained by: Dan Convery #46800076
  • Originally Created by: Utah State Historical Society
  • Added: 2 Feb 2000
  • Find A Grave Memorial 69314
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Elizabeth Smith Lovell (10 Mar 1806–27 Feb 1889), Find A Grave Memorial no. 69314, citing Oak City Cemetery, Oak City, Millard County, Utah, USA ; Maintained by Dan Convery #46800076 (contributor 46800076) .