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Capt Phillip Bissinger

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Capt Phillip Bissinger

Birth
Germany
Death
11 Nov 1926 (aged 84)
Reading, Berks County, Pennsylvania, USA
Burial
Reading, Berks County, Pennsylvania, USA
Memorial ID
68999346 View Source

Enlisted in Company G, Pennsylvania 79th Infantry Regiment on 19 Sep 1861.
Promoted to Full Sergeant Major.
Promoted to Full 1st Lieutenant on 17 Jan 1863.
Promoted to Full Captain on 01 Dec 1863.
Mustered out on 12 Sep 1864.

Undoubtedly one of the most influential, respected and powerful men in Reading during that period.
He arrived from Germany with his parents at the age of 13. His father was George Bissinger who settled in Baltimore.
Phillip arrived in Berks county in 1845. When the Civil War began he became a sergeant major in the 79th Pa. Vol. Infantry. He was later promoted to 1st Lieutenant and finally became captain of company F of the same infantry. He resigned his commission Sep 12 1864.
After the war he returned to Reading and later opened the Café Bissinger which became a very prominent and prestigious establishment not only locally but throughout the region
As a member of the Shriners he was instrumental in the organization and construction of the Rajah Temple in 1892. He was a talented musician, a composer and director of music. He organized the Philharmonic Society where he directed concerts.

There was horrible tragedy in his life however,
Apparently upset, suspecting her husband of infidelity,
Louisa Bissinger, nee Eban, age 39, pregnant with child, walked calmly down the Union Canal towpath one day, filling a basket with rocks as her three dutiful children followed along. They strolled casually for about two miles. As she passed the canal office she commented to the office manager " It is warm". He replied "Yes indeed". She then said "We have to carry a basket and take the children with us". The mother and children were very nicely dressed. It was thought she had the children help in filling the basket with rocks. As she neared the canal lock she tied the basket to her waist with a rope she brought along, intended to keep her and the children submerged. She then gathered the children in her arms and threw herself and the children into the canal. It was premeditated and calculated. A witness saw the event and viewed Phillip Jr. come to the surface struggling but was unable to save him as he could not swim. He ran for help. The bodies were recovered later that day. The children were Lillie age 9, Mollie age 6, and Phillip Jr. age 3, and the mother's unborn fetus. They were often seen at their father's dining establishment and were adored by all. The mother too was well liked and respected and no one suspected she had any emotional problems nor is there any documented reason for her actions. On her person when she was recovered was a note simply giving Capt. Bissingers name and address. There were no other messages from her.
Capt. Bissinger remarried Ida Sebald Rosenthal but had no other children. He was still tending bar in 1880.
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Suggested edit: The son of George Bissinger, in 1860 he was a bartender living with his apparent sister Mary in Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

A Civil War veteran, he enlisted at the stated age of nineteen in Lancaster September 19, 1861, mustered into federal service there October 4 as a private with Co. G, 79th Pennsylvania Infantry, but promoted to the staff at the rank of sergeant major, date unknown, and to 1st lieutenant of Co. F to date January 17, 1863. He re-enlisted as a Veteran Volunteer December 1, 1863, at Chattanooga, Tennessee, December 1, 1863, and promoted to captain of Co. F that day. In September 1864, he asked to be relieved of duty because his mother was ill and his father given to "intemperate habits" and not seeing to her needs. His resignation was accepted effective September 12, 1864. He is in Bates History of Pennsylvania Volunteers as "Rissinger" but is correctly spelled in the company register.

Contributor: Dennis Brandt (47232334) •

Enlisted in Company G, Pennsylvania 79th Infantry Regiment on 19 Sep 1861.
Promoted to Full Sergeant Major.
Promoted to Full 1st Lieutenant on 17 Jan 1863.
Promoted to Full Captain on 01 Dec 1863.
Mustered out on 12 Sep 1864.

Undoubtedly one of the most influential, respected and powerful men in Reading during that period.
He arrived from Germany with his parents at the age of 13. His father was George Bissinger who settled in Baltimore.
Phillip arrived in Berks county in 1845. When the Civil War began he became a sergeant major in the 79th Pa. Vol. Infantry. He was later promoted to 1st Lieutenant and finally became captain of company F of the same infantry. He resigned his commission Sep 12 1864.
After the war he returned to Reading and later opened the Café Bissinger which became a very prominent and prestigious establishment not only locally but throughout the region
As a member of the Shriners he was instrumental in the organization and construction of the Rajah Temple in 1892. He was a talented musician, a composer and director of music. He organized the Philharmonic Society where he directed concerts.

There was horrible tragedy in his life however,
Apparently upset, suspecting her husband of infidelity,
Louisa Bissinger, nee Eban, age 39, pregnant with child, walked calmly down the Union Canal towpath one day, filling a basket with rocks as her three dutiful children followed along. They strolled casually for about two miles. As she passed the canal office she commented to the office manager " It is warm". He replied "Yes indeed". She then said "We have to carry a basket and take the children with us". The mother and children were very nicely dressed. It was thought she had the children help in filling the basket with rocks. As she neared the canal lock she tied the basket to her waist with a rope she brought along, intended to keep her and the children submerged. She then gathered the children in her arms and threw herself and the children into the canal. It was premeditated and calculated. A witness saw the event and viewed Phillip Jr. come to the surface struggling but was unable to save him as he could not swim. He ran for help. The bodies were recovered later that day. The children were Lillie age 9, Mollie age 6, and Phillip Jr. age 3, and the mother's unborn fetus. They were often seen at their father's dining establishment and were adored by all. The mother too was well liked and respected and no one suspected she had any emotional problems nor is there any documented reason for her actions. On her person when she was recovered was a note simply giving Capt. Bissingers name and address. There were no other messages from her.
Capt. Bissinger remarried Ida Sebald Rosenthal but had no other children. He was still tending bar in 1880.
''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''

Suggested edit: The son of George Bissinger, in 1860 he was a bartender living with his apparent sister Mary in Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

A Civil War veteran, he enlisted at the stated age of nineteen in Lancaster September 19, 1861, mustered into federal service there October 4 as a private with Co. G, 79th Pennsylvania Infantry, but promoted to the staff at the rank of sergeant major, date unknown, and to 1st lieutenant of Co. F to date January 17, 1863. He re-enlisted as a Veteran Volunteer December 1, 1863, at Chattanooga, Tennessee, December 1, 1863, and promoted to captain of Co. F that day. In September 1864, he asked to be relieved of duty because his mother was ill and his father given to "intemperate habits" and not seeing to her needs. His resignation was accepted effective September 12, 1864. He is in Bates History of Pennsylvania Volunteers as "Rissinger" but is correctly spelled in the company register.

Contributor: Dennis Brandt (47232334) •


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