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Pvt Nathan Hollingsworth

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Pvt Nathan Hollingsworth

Birth
Death 21 May 1927 (aged 87)
Burial Frost, Navarro County, Texas, USA
Plot
Memorial ID 6834560 View Source

Nathan Hollingsworth was in Company H of the 1st Texas Infantry. This was one of three Texas Infantry Regiments which was part of the famous brigade of the Army of Northern Virginia known as HOOD'S TEXAS BRIGADE. Company H was nicknamed the Texas Guards and were also know as the Anderson County Guards. The First Texas Infantry was assigned to duty in the Potomac District upon being mustered in. Shortly thereafter, this department became part of the Army of Northern Virginia. The regiment served in that army attached to Longstreet's Corps. With General Longstreet, the unit moved to Georgia in September, 1863, and served in the Army of Tennessee and in the Department of East Tennessee before returning to the Army of Northern Virginia in the spring of 1864. Nathan enlisted at Camp Quantico, Virginia, on October 20, 1861. He was appointed 2nd Sergeant on September 17, 1862, to replace his brother, Joseph Coleman Hollingsworth, who had been wounded in The Battle of Antietam and later died of those wounds. Nathan was wounded through the buttocks at the assault at Petersburg, Virginia, on June 22, 1864. [According to his great-niece, Sammie Strain Armstrong, he had suffered a gunshot wound to the throat and he would let the kids feel the bullet that still remained there. He also had one in the buttock...however, inspection of that one was off limits.] Nathan served until he was paroled at Appomattox, Virginia, on April 12, 1865. A monument to HOOD'S BRIGADE was dedicated in 1910, and stands today on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol in Austin, Texas. Notice the picture on the right of Nathan standing proudly beside that monument.

On October 1, 1916, Nathan was admitted to the Confederate Home in Austin, Texas. He was shown to have been discharged on November 7, 1917. He was readmitted on February 1, 1919. On May 21, 1927, he died of pneumonia. On the Confederate Home Roster, he had listed under "Whom to Write", Mrs. Kate Sanders, dau., and A.F. [sic, should have been A.H.] Strain. In the apparent absence of his daughter, Alexander Hunter Strain, Nathan's nephew had his body brought back to Frost, Navarro County, Texas, and paid for the funeral expenses. He is buried on the Sander's Plot in the Frost Cemetery. His headstone is a Confederate Marker and he is interred next to his wife, Mary Jane. [His Confederate Pension Application is #6570, Navarro County, Texas]

-Bio researched and submitted by Strain Hilton Armstrong


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