Alfred De Vigny

Alfred De Vigny

Birth
Loches, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France
Death 17 Sep 1863 (aged 66)
Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
Burial Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
Plot Division 13
Memorial ID 6800 · View Source
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French Poet. He was an early leader of French Romanticism and also produced novels, plays, and translations of Shakespeare. His first poem, “Le Bal,” was published in 1820 and a narrative poem, “Éloa,” in 1824. He collected his recent works in January 1826 in “Poèmes antiques et modernes.” Three months after that, he had “Cinq-Mars” published which was the first important historical novel in French. It is based on the life of Louis XIII's favorite Henri Coiffier de Ruzé, Marquis of Cinq-Mars, who conspired against the Cardinal de Richelieu. With the success of these two volumes, he was a rising star of the Romantic movement. The visit of an English theater troupe to Paris in 1827 revived French interest in Shakespeare and he worked with Emile Deschamps on a translation of Romeo and Juliet. He presented his first original play in 1831, La Maréchale d'Ancre, a historical drama recounting the events leading up to the reign of King Louis XIII. In 1835, he produced a drama titled Chatterton, based on the life of Thomas Chatterton. It is considered to be one of the best of the French romantic dramas and is still performed regularly. The story of Chatterton had inspired one of the three episodes of his philosophical novel “Stello” (1832). “Servitude et grandeur militaires” (1835) was a similar three-party meditation on the condition of the soldier. After the death of his mother in 1838, he inherited the property of Maine-Giraud, where it was said that he had withdrawn to his 'ivory tower,' an expression Sainte-Beuve coined with reference to him. There is where he wrote some of his most famous poems, including “La Mort du loup” and “La Maison du berger.” In 1845, after several unsuccessful attempts to be elected, he became a member of the Académie Francaise. In later years, he stopped having anything published. However, he continued to write, and his Journal is considered by modern scholars to be a great work in its own right, though it awaits a definitive scholarly edition. He considered himself a thinker as well as a literary author. In his later years he spent much time preparing the posthumous collection of poems now known as “Les Destinées,” for which his intended title was Poèmes Philosophiques. It concludes with his final message to the world, “L'Esprit pur.” He developed what is believed to have been stomach cancer in his early 60s and died in Paris on September 17, 1863, a few months after the death of his wife. He was buried beside her in the Cimetière de Montmartre in Paris. Several of his works were published posthumously.

Bio by: Glendora


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  • Maintained by: Find A Grave
  • Added: 30 Oct 1999
  • Find A Grave Memorial 6800
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Alfred De Vigny (27 Mar 1797–17 Sep 1863), Find A Grave Memorial no. 6800, citing Cimetiere de Montmartre, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave .