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 William Christian Bullitt Jr.

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William Christian Bullitt Jr. Famous memorial

Birth
Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA
Death
15 Feb 1967 (aged 76)
Neuilly-sur-Seine, Departement des Hauts-de-Seine, Île-de-France, France
Burial
Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA GPS-Latitude: 39.9470673, Longitude: -75.2017670
Plot
CC 46, SW pt.
Memorial ID
6788602 View Source

Author, Diplomat. He is credited as the first United States Ambassador to the Soviet Union, serving from 1933 to 1936, as well as being an accomplished author and journalist. Beginning his relationship with the Soviet Union, he was sent in 1919 as an assistant secretary of state by United States President Woodrow Wilson to assess the new Bolshevik government, which he did and recommended that the United States recognize the new government of the Soviet Union. He served as an attach ̌to the American Commission to Negotiate the Peace at the Paris Peace Conference. His suggestion was rejected by President Wilson. After this disagreement, he resigned in May of 1919 and did not publicly support Wilson in his promotion of the Treaty of Versailles. He appeared before the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations and his testimony helped cause the treaty to be defeated in the Senate. He wrote the 1926 novel "It's Not Done," which was considered a great commercial success, selling more than 150,000 copies and going into twenty-four printings. This followed with an unpublished novel, "The Divine Wisdom," in addition to a host of unpublished plays and short stories. In 1933 President Franklin Roosevelt appointed him Ambassador to the Soviet Union. Later, he served as the United States Ambassador to France, from 1936 to May of 1940. He was appointed provisional mayor of Paris and leaving in July only after Nazi Forces had entered the city. As ambassador at large in 1941 and 1942, he was sent to North Africa and the Middle East before becoming special assistant to the Secretary of the Navy in 1942 and 1943. After publishing a 1943 article on the sexual activities of Assistant Secretary of State Sumner Welles, he fell out of favor with Roosevelt and the Democratic Party. Toward the end of the war, he returned to France and served in the Army of the Free French under General Charles De Gaulle at the rank of major in the infantry. He received both French and American decorations including the Croix de Guerre. Off and on, he lived many years in France. After the war, he spent the next nine years of the Cold War as a journalist for "Life," "Reader's Digest," "Time," and "Look" magazines, writing against communism and especially in China. On the subject of world affairs, he published "The Great Globe Itself" in 1946. He was a candidate for Mayor of Philadelphia but was defeated. He co-authored, with "the Father of Psychoanalysis," Sigmund Freud, the textbook, "Thomas Woodrow Wilson, Twenty-eighth President of the United States: A Psychological Study," which was written in the 1930s but published in 1967. Born part of Philadelphia's aristocracy, he refused to attend private schools but instead attended the local public schools. His parents traveled to Europe frequently and he learned both French and German as a child. He graduated from Yale University in 1912 and attended, but did not graduate, Harvard Law School. In 1914, he and his mother toured Russia and Germany but left with the outbreak of World War I. He started as a journalist with the "Philadelphia Public Ledger," eventually writing his own column. After his marriage in March of 1916, he and his wife went to France where he was a respected war correspondent and was recognized as an authority on Russian politics. He married twice and both wives were strong, accomplished professional women: He first married Aimee Ernesta Drinker, and after their divorced by 1923, he married Louise Bryant, the widow of one of the founders of the American Communist Party, John Reed. A daughter was born before their bitter divorce by 1930. He retired to his Massachusetts farm and died of leukemia while in Paris. The 655-page collection, "For The President Personal Secret: Correspondence between President Franklin D. and William C. Bullitt," was not published until 1973 after being edited by his brother, Orville Bullitt. His many personal papers are archived at Yale University.

Author, Diplomat. He is credited as the first United States Ambassador to the Soviet Union, serving from 1933 to 1936, as well as being an accomplished author and journalist. Beginning his relationship with the Soviet Union, he was sent in 1919 as an assistant secretary of state by United States President Woodrow Wilson to assess the new Bolshevik government, which he did and recommended that the United States recognize the new government of the Soviet Union. He served as an attach ̌to the American Commission to Negotiate the Peace at the Paris Peace Conference. His suggestion was rejected by President Wilson. After this disagreement, he resigned in May of 1919 and did not publicly support Wilson in his promotion of the Treaty of Versailles. He appeared before the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations and his testimony helped cause the treaty to be defeated in the Senate. He wrote the 1926 novel "It's Not Done," which was considered a great commercial success, selling more than 150,000 copies and going into twenty-four printings. This followed with an unpublished novel, "The Divine Wisdom," in addition to a host of unpublished plays and short stories. In 1933 President Franklin Roosevelt appointed him Ambassador to the Soviet Union. Later, he served as the United States Ambassador to France, from 1936 to May of 1940. He was appointed provisional mayor of Paris and leaving in July only after Nazi Forces had entered the city. As ambassador at large in 1941 and 1942, he was sent to North Africa and the Middle East before becoming special assistant to the Secretary of the Navy in 1942 and 1943. After publishing a 1943 article on the sexual activities of Assistant Secretary of State Sumner Welles, he fell out of favor with Roosevelt and the Democratic Party. Toward the end of the war, he returned to France and served in the Army of the Free French under General Charles De Gaulle at the rank of major in the infantry. He received both French and American decorations including the Croix de Guerre. Off and on, he lived many years in France. After the war, he spent the next nine years of the Cold War as a journalist for "Life," "Reader's Digest," "Time," and "Look" magazines, writing against communism and especially in China. On the subject of world affairs, he published "The Great Globe Itself" in 1946. He was a candidate for Mayor of Philadelphia but was defeated. He co-authored, with "the Father of Psychoanalysis," Sigmund Freud, the textbook, "Thomas Woodrow Wilson, Twenty-eighth President of the United States: A Psychological Study," which was written in the 1930s but published in 1967. Born part of Philadelphia's aristocracy, he refused to attend private schools but instead attended the local public schools. His parents traveled to Europe frequently and he learned both French and German as a child. He graduated from Yale University in 1912 and attended, but did not graduate, Harvard Law School. In 1914, he and his mother toured Russia and Germany but left with the outbreak of World War I. He started as a journalist with the "Philadelphia Public Ledger," eventually writing his own column. After his marriage in March of 1916, he and his wife went to France where he was a respected war correspondent and was recognized as an authority on Russian politics. He married twice and both wives were strong, accomplished professional women: He first married Aimee Ernesta Drinker, and after their divorced by 1923, he married Louise Bryant, the widow of one of the founders of the American Communist Party, John Reed. A daughter was born before their bitter divorce by 1930. He retired to his Massachusetts farm and died of leukemia while in Paris. The 655-page collection, "For The President Personal Secret: Correspondence between President Franklin D. and William C. Bullitt," was not published until 1973 after being edited by his brother, Orville Bullitt. His many personal papers are archived at Yale University.

Bio by: Linda Davis


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: Garver Graver
  • Added: 19 Sep 2002
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 6788602
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/6788602/william-christian-bullitt: accessed ), memorial page for William Christian Bullitt Jr. (25 Jan 1891–15 Feb 1967), Find a Grave Memorial ID 6788602, citing Woodlands Cemetery, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA; Maintained by Find a Grave.