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 Joseph Howard Hennage Jr.

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Joseph Howard Hennage Jr.

Birth
District of Columbia, USA
Death 29 Dec 2010 (aged 89)
Williamsburg City, Virginia, USA
Burial Williamsburg, Williamsburg City, Virginia, USA
Memorial ID 67438105 View Source

U. S. Navy, WWII
son of Joseph Howard and Mary Helen Cooke Hennage
husband of Margaret Isabella Bond Hennage (divorced) and June Elizabeth Stedman Hennage

From the Virginia Gazette, Williamsburg, VA:
Joseph Howard Hennage, a Washington printer, publisher, and American antiques collector, died Dec. 29, just days before his 90th birthday. He is survived by his wife of 63 years, June Stedman Hennage. The Hennages have been supporters of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, and because of their largesse in 1985, the Hennage Auditorium at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum was named in their honor. Mr. Hennage was also a founding member of the Raleigh Tavern Society, the foundation's highest annual giving group, and a member of the President's Council. In 1994 Joe and June Hennage received the Churchill Bell Award, the founda­tion's most prestigious honor, for their service and generosity. Colin Campbell, president of Colonial Williamsburg, said "Joe was a great friend to many of us at Colonial Williamsburg. He loved the wonderful home that he and June designed and built in Williamsburg. He loved celebrating with friends from near and far. He loved his country and welcomed opportunities to say so. His extraordinary legacy at Colonial Williamsburg will be a cause for unending gratitude." Mr. Hennage was born in Washington on Jan. 2, 1921. After serving in the Navy for four years during World War II, he returned to the nation's capital in 1945 and founded Hennage Creative Printers. The privately held company was located for decades at 9th and H streets, NW, and later moved to Alexandria. He married June Elizabeth Stedman in 1947, and over the course of a distinguished printing, antiques collecting, and philanthropic career in the arts and publishing, their marriage was a model of a full partnership in every aspect of the business. What distinguished Mr. Hennage in his professional career as a printer and in his achievements as an antiquarian and collector was his enthusiasm, knowledge and passion. He held numerous offices and received many honors in the printing trades. In the late 1960s he served as president of the Master Printers of America, and shortly thereafter became chairman of the Printing Industries of America. Both of these organizations subsequently named him "Man of the Year." He also served as president of the Printing Industry of Metropolitan Washington and the Creative Printers of America. Throughout his 50-year career, he also served on the advisory boards of the American Security and Trust Company and George Washington University. He also served as director of Graphic Arts for the Mutual Insurance Co. and director of the Washington Board of Trade. He had an intense admiration for Benjamin Franklin. During the Bicentennial, Hennage wrote and published an article in Graphics Arts Monthly entitled "America's Patriot Printers Catalysts for Freedom," where he identified himself as an "unabashed fan" of Franklin. A headnote indicated that "for years Joe Hennage made an annual event of laying a wreath at Franklin's statue at 10th and Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington." The early passion of the Hennages for American fine arts and decorative arts was apparent in their membership circle of the National Gallery of Art; the Henry Francis DuPont Collectors Circle at Winterthur in Delaware; and in his work as a trustee at the Baltimore Museum of Fine Art. In 1965-96, he was a member and sometime chairman of the Fine Arts Committee of the Department of State Diplomatic Reception Rooms, created by the renowned Clement Conger. During the Nixon presidency the Hennages were instrumental in the furnishing of period rooms in the Federal style at the Diplomatic Reception Rooms of the State Department, as well as at the National Archives and the Supreme Court. During the tenure of Chief Justice Warren Burger, Hennage served as a trustee of the Supreme Court Historical Society. The Hennages never saw themselves as "owners" of their collection, but as the custodians. In the course of time they handed them over for safekeeping by Colonial Williamsburg. In 1988 the Hennages' relocated their residence from Chevy Chase, Md., to a new Georgian-style home they built in Williamsburg. The pinnacle achievement of Joe Hennage as a printer was acquiring the publishing rights to Williams MacPherson Hornor's monumental, but very rare, "Blue Book: Philadelphia Furniture, William Penn to George Washington" (1935), in 1969, founding his own Highland House Publishers, in Washington, and republishing the classic in 1977. Hennage never lost his patriotic faith in history, in the use of the past to instruct the present and improve the future. A memorial service will be announced at a later date.


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  • Created by: Dal Mallory
  • Added: 25 Mar 2011
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 67438105
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/67438105/joseph-howard-hennage : accessed ), memorial page for Joseph Howard Hennage Jr. (2 Jan 1921–29 Dec 2010), Find a Grave Memorial ID 67438105, citing Bruton Parish Episcopal Church Cemetery, Williamsburg, Williamsburg City, Virginia, USA ; Maintained by Dal Mallory (contributor 46586597) .