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 William Ozmun Wyckoff

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William Ozmun Wyckoff

Birth
South Lansing, Tompkins County, New York, USA
Death
11 Jul 1895 (aged 60)
Cape Vincent, Jefferson County, New York, USA
Burial
Ithaca, Tompkins County, New York, USA
Memorial ID
67276460 View Source

Excerpt from "America's Successful Men of Affairs: An Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous Biography"
Volume I by John Sherlock Young

page 748
WILLIAM OZMUN WYCKOFF, manufacturer, born on a farm in the town of Lansing, Tompkins county, N.Y., Feb. 16, 1835, died at the Thousand Islands, N.Y., July 11, 1895. He was a son of Ira Wyckoff, a prominent citizen and farmer. His mother was Julia A., daughter of William Ozmun, a farmer of the same town, while his early ancesters were Holland farmers, who came to this country about 1675, settling on Long Island. Mr. Wyckoff spent his early life in farming, receiving a common school education, and attending the Ithaca academy a few terms. In 1856, he settled upon a quarter section of land in Blue Earth county, Minn., with a view of securing means to attend college; but the reaction of 1857 put this out of the question, and he returned to Ithaca and took up the study of law. During the Civil War, he served two [p.747] years in the 32d N.Y. Inf., going in as a private and rising to the rank of captain. He was admitted to the bar, Nov. 16, 1863, and in the meantime had attended and received a diploma from Ames Business College in Syracuse. In 1866, he became official court stenographer of the Supreme Court for the 6th Judicial District of the State and held the position for sixteen consecutive years. The purchase of a Remington type writing machine, in 1875, for use in transcribing court reports, drew his attention to the machine itself, and, obtaining an agency for their sale, he found that he could dispose of them so successfully that he resolved to turn from professional pursuits to a practical career. First, a salesman for The Remington Standard Typewriter Co., of Ilion, he finally, about 1882, established the firm of Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict, with about $20,000 of capital, and made a contract with E. Remington & Sons, whereby the firm became sole agents for the sale of the machines. They were successful from the start. In 1886, they bought the whole plant and patent rights of the Ilion concern. Their business continuing to expand, Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict were incorporated May 19, 1892, with a capital stock of $3,000,000. Mr. Wyckoff was president of the company, which manufactures the Remington type writing machine. He was for years a resident of the metropolis and after that made his home in Brooklyn. He was a member of the Republican club and the Loyal Legion of this city and the Union League club of Brooklyn, and for several years a member of the executive committee of the latter; and a trustee of The Union Type Writer Co., and a member of the executive committee. He was married Oct. 20, 1863, to Frances V., daughter of Almon C. Ives, of South Lansing, N.Y., and their children are Edward G., now a prominent merchant of Syracuse, N.Y., and Clarence F. Wyckoff, of the class of '98, Cornell University.[p.748]

Excerpt from "America's Successful Men of Affairs: An Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous Biography"
Volume I by John Sherlock Young

page 748
WILLIAM OZMUN WYCKOFF, manufacturer, born on a farm in the town of Lansing, Tompkins county, N.Y., Feb. 16, 1835, died at the Thousand Islands, N.Y., July 11, 1895. He was a son of Ira Wyckoff, a prominent citizen and farmer. His mother was Julia A., daughter of William Ozmun, a farmer of the same town, while his early ancesters were Holland farmers, who came to this country about 1675, settling on Long Island. Mr. Wyckoff spent his early life in farming, receiving a common school education, and attending the Ithaca academy a few terms. In 1856, he settled upon a quarter section of land in Blue Earth county, Minn., with a view of securing means to attend college; but the reaction of 1857 put this out of the question, and he returned to Ithaca and took up the study of law. During the Civil War, he served two [p.747] years in the 32d N.Y. Inf., going in as a private and rising to the rank of captain. He was admitted to the bar, Nov. 16, 1863, and in the meantime had attended and received a diploma from Ames Business College in Syracuse. In 1866, he became official court stenographer of the Supreme Court for the 6th Judicial District of the State and held the position for sixteen consecutive years. The purchase of a Remington type writing machine, in 1875, for use in transcribing court reports, drew his attention to the machine itself, and, obtaining an agency for their sale, he found that he could dispose of them so successfully that he resolved to turn from professional pursuits to a practical career. First, a salesman for The Remington Standard Typewriter Co., of Ilion, he finally, about 1882, established the firm of Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict, with about $20,000 of capital, and made a contract with E. Remington & Sons, whereby the firm became sole agents for the sale of the machines. They were successful from the start. In 1886, they bought the whole plant and patent rights of the Ilion concern. Their business continuing to expand, Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict were incorporated May 19, 1892, with a capital stock of $3,000,000. Mr. Wyckoff was president of the company, which manufactures the Remington type writing machine. He was for years a resident of the metropolis and after that made his home in Brooklyn. He was a member of the Republican club and the Loyal Legion of this city and the Union League club of Brooklyn, and for several years a member of the executive committee of the latter; and a trustee of The Union Type Writer Co., and a member of the executive committee. He was married Oct. 20, 1863, to Frances V., daughter of Almon C. Ives, of South Lansing, N.Y., and their children are Edward G., now a prominent merchant of Syracuse, N.Y., and Clarence F. Wyckoff, of the class of '98, Cornell University.[p.748]


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