Lieut Edward Jones Chiswell

Lieut Edward Jones Chiswell

Birth
Montgomery County, Maryland, USA
Death 21 Sep 1906 (aged 70)
Poolesville, Montgomery County, Maryland, USA
Burial Beallsville, Montgomery County, Maryland, USA
Plot Row D, Lot 7, Site 4
Memorial ID 6699162 · View Source
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Son of Thomas Fletchall Chiswell and Mary Eleanor Jones

Husband of Evie White Allnutt, married on 4 Dec 1865

Father of:
- Lawrence Allnutt Chiswell
- Thomas Franklin Chiswell
- Edward Lee Chiswell
- Benjamin Maurice Chiswell
- Mary Eleanor Chiswell
- Sarah Edith Chiswell

Military Service

Edward Jones Chiswell was a 2nd Lieutenant in Lt. Col. Elijah Veirs White's "Comanches" - 35th Battalion, Virginia Cavalry, Company B, during the Civil War (Confederate States of America - CSA).

• Appointed 2nd Lieutenant on September 1, 1862.
• Wounded November 1864.
• Paroled May 16, 1865 at Edwards Ferry, Maryland.

Obituary
Edward Chiswell Dead
Was a Gallant Confederate And a Former Legislator.
[Special Dispatch to the Baltimore Sun.]

Boyds, Md., Sept. 21. — Mr. Edward Chiswell, one of the most prominent citizens in this section of Montgomery county, died at his home at Dickerson’s shortly after noon today, after an illness of some months. About six years ago he was stricken with paralysis, and he had another attack recently, which caused his death. He was 70 years old.

Mr. Chiswell served in the Confederate Army with distinction during the Civil War, fighting at Cedar Mountain, second Manassas, the seven days’ fight before Richmond and at Brandy Station. He was a member of Company B, of White’s Battalion.

Mr. Chiswell served in the Maryland Legislature some years ago, and throughout his life he has always been a most progressive citizen. He is survived by his widow, who was a Miss Allnutt, of a prominent family of this section, and by four sons — Lawrence and E.L. Chiswell, prominent merchants at Dickeron’s; Lieut. B.M. Chiswell, of the Revenue Cutter Service, stationed at Wilmington, N.C. and Thomas F. Chiswell, a farmer, at home — and by two daughters — Mrs. Mary Darby and Mrs. Norman Wootten.

Originally published in the Baltimore Sun (MD) 22 Sept. 1906

Contributor: achantle (47704678)