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Col Edwin Sherman Jenney

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Col Edwin Sherman Jenney

Birth
Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, New York, USA
Death
28 Jun 1900 (aged 59)
Union Springs, Cayuga County, New York, USA
Burial
Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York, USA
Plot
Sect 27 lot 55
Memorial ID
66701192 View Source

COL. EDWIN S. JENNEY
DEATH OF WELL-KNOWN MEMBER OF THE BAR.
One of the First to Volunteer for Service in the Civil War - Passed Away at Union Springs Last Evening After a Long Illness.
Col. Edwin S. Jenney, one of the most prominent members of the bar of Onondaga county, died last evening at Union Springs, where he had been for the last few months. For a year or more Mr. Jenney had been in failing health and had spent much of his time between his home in this city, on his farm, and at Union Springs. On Wednesday evening his condition became critical, and he soon passed into an unconscious condition, from which he never rallied, passing away at 9:30 o'clock, death being due to general debility. The remains were brought to this city this morning, and taken to the family home in Green street where the funeral, which will be private, will be held on Sunday. In his death the bar loses one of its ablest exponents and another of the gallant soldiers of the Civil war has passed away.
Edwin S. Jenney was the son of William Jenney, a Baptist clergyman, who was for many years principal of the Dutchess County academy, a private school at Poughkeepsie. E. S. Jenney was born in Poughkeepsie September 5th, 1840. He was educated in the public schools at Poughkeepsie and at Kalamazoo college. In 1860 he moved to this city and began the study of law in the office of Pratt & Mitchell.
When the war broke out he became Second Lieutenant of the Zouaves, organized by Capt. J. G. Butler. This company was the first to leave Syracuse. Before it was mustered into service, however, Lieutenant Jenney went to Oneida county and organized a company with himself as Captain. The two companies went out together as Company D and Company I, respectively, in the same regiment. Captain Jenney was the first Captain in New York to put into barracks a full company of men.
The regiment went at once to Fortress Monroe. Their first trial by fire was at Big Bethel. They were next detailed to garrison duty at Fort McHenry. In October Captain Jenney, at the suggestion of Governor Morgan, returned to Syracuse and recruited Jenney's battery, Inter Battery F of the Third New York Artillery regiment. He went with his battery to Washington and thence to Fort Corcoran. The battery fought at Whitehall, Kinston and Goldsboro in the Virginia campaign in 1862. Captain Jenney was promoted to Major of the regiments. The regiment was part of General Hunter's command in the attack on Charleston later in 1862, Major Jenney, serving as chief of staff to Brigadier General Vogdes. In July, 1863, he was appointed Judge Advocate by Gen. B. F. Butler, and later as Provost Judge of the Department of North Carolina.
In 1864 the One Hundred and Eighty-fifth regiment was organized in Syracuse, Governor Seymour commissioned Major Jenney Colonel of the regiment. Colonel Jenney was captured on his way north, but was paroled. The One Hundred and Eighty-fifth regiment was mustered in September 22d, 1864, and was assigned to the Fifth army corps, First division, First brigade, General Chamberlain. The regiment and its Colonel served with credit and gallantry until February, 1865. He asked the War department to define his status as an "escaped" instead of a "paroled" prisoner, having received assurances from General Butler that he could re-enlist with safety and with honor. Secretary Stanton refused to issue the order and Colonel Jenney in February, 1865, resigned. Gustavus Sniper succeeded him in command of the One Hundred an Eighty-fifth.
Colonel Jenney returned to Syracuse and resumed his law studies under William C. Ruger. He was admitted to the bar in September, 1865. He was later a member of the firm of Ruger & Jenney. The firms with which Colonel Jenney has been connected have since been Rugor, Wallace & Jenney, Ruger, Jenney, Brooks & French, Ruger, Jenney, Brooks& Marshall, Jenney & Marshall and Jenney & Jenney. The members of the firm of Jenney & Jenney have been Col. E. S. Jenney, William S. Jenney, Alexander D. Jenney and Miss Julie R. Jenney. Colonel Jenney ran for County Judge in 1876 and ran several thousand votes ahead of his ticket. He was Corporation Counsel for four years and was Quartermaster General on the staff of Governor Grover Cleveland.
Colonel Jenney was a lifelong Democrat, prominent in party counsels and active, but not in his later years in harmony with the Democratic organization. He worked with Thomas Ryan for years in opposition to the Kirk organization.
Colonel Jenney in 1863 married Miss Marie H. Saul, daughter of George F. Saul. He leaves besides his widow, two sons and two daughters, William S., Alexander D., Julie R. and the Rev. Marie H. Jenney. His sons and his elder daughter were partners of their father in the law firm of Jenney & Jenney, and Miss Marie Jenney is a Unitarian minister, now in Des Moines, Ia.

Syracuse, New York
The Herald newspaper
Friday evening, June 29, 1900
Page 16, Column 3

COL. EDWIN S. JENNEY
DEATH OF WELL-KNOWN MEMBER OF THE BAR.
One of the First to Volunteer for Service in the Civil War - Passed Away at Union Springs Last Evening After a Long Illness.
Col. Edwin S. Jenney, one of the most prominent members of the bar of Onondaga county, died last evening at Union Springs, where he had been for the last few months. For a year or more Mr. Jenney had been in failing health and had spent much of his time between his home in this city, on his farm, and at Union Springs. On Wednesday evening his condition became critical, and he soon passed into an unconscious condition, from which he never rallied, passing away at 9:30 o'clock, death being due to general debility. The remains were brought to this city this morning, and taken to the family home in Green street where the funeral, which will be private, will be held on Sunday. In his death the bar loses one of its ablest exponents and another of the gallant soldiers of the Civil war has passed away.
Edwin S. Jenney was the son of William Jenney, a Baptist clergyman, who was for many years principal of the Dutchess County academy, a private school at Poughkeepsie. E. S. Jenney was born in Poughkeepsie September 5th, 1840. He was educated in the public schools at Poughkeepsie and at Kalamazoo college. In 1860 he moved to this city and began the study of law in the office of Pratt & Mitchell.
When the war broke out he became Second Lieutenant of the Zouaves, organized by Capt. J. G. Butler. This company was the first to leave Syracuse. Before it was mustered into service, however, Lieutenant Jenney went to Oneida county and organized a company with himself as Captain. The two companies went out together as Company D and Company I, respectively, in the same regiment. Captain Jenney was the first Captain in New York to put into barracks a full company of men.
The regiment went at once to Fortress Monroe. Their first trial by fire was at Big Bethel. They were next detailed to garrison duty at Fort McHenry. In October Captain Jenney, at the suggestion of Governor Morgan, returned to Syracuse and recruited Jenney's battery, Inter Battery F of the Third New York Artillery regiment. He went with his battery to Washington and thence to Fort Corcoran. The battery fought at Whitehall, Kinston and Goldsboro in the Virginia campaign in 1862. Captain Jenney was promoted to Major of the regiments. The regiment was part of General Hunter's command in the attack on Charleston later in 1862, Major Jenney, serving as chief of staff to Brigadier General Vogdes. In July, 1863, he was appointed Judge Advocate by Gen. B. F. Butler, and later as Provost Judge of the Department of North Carolina.
In 1864 the One Hundred and Eighty-fifth regiment was organized in Syracuse, Governor Seymour commissioned Major Jenney Colonel of the regiment. Colonel Jenney was captured on his way north, but was paroled. The One Hundred and Eighty-fifth regiment was mustered in September 22d, 1864, and was assigned to the Fifth army corps, First division, First brigade, General Chamberlain. The regiment and its Colonel served with credit and gallantry until February, 1865. He asked the War department to define his status as an "escaped" instead of a "paroled" prisoner, having received assurances from General Butler that he could re-enlist with safety and with honor. Secretary Stanton refused to issue the order and Colonel Jenney in February, 1865, resigned. Gustavus Sniper succeeded him in command of the One Hundred an Eighty-fifth.
Colonel Jenney returned to Syracuse and resumed his law studies under William C. Ruger. He was admitted to the bar in September, 1865. He was later a member of the firm of Ruger & Jenney. The firms with which Colonel Jenney has been connected have since been Rugor, Wallace & Jenney, Ruger, Jenney, Brooks & French, Ruger, Jenney, Brooks& Marshall, Jenney & Marshall and Jenney & Jenney. The members of the firm of Jenney & Jenney have been Col. E. S. Jenney, William S. Jenney, Alexander D. Jenney and Miss Julie R. Jenney. Colonel Jenney ran for County Judge in 1876 and ran several thousand votes ahead of his ticket. He was Corporation Counsel for four years and was Quartermaster General on the staff of Governor Grover Cleveland.
Colonel Jenney was a lifelong Democrat, prominent in party counsels and active, but not in his later years in harmony with the Democratic organization. He worked with Thomas Ryan for years in opposition to the Kirk organization.
Colonel Jenney in 1863 married Miss Marie H. Saul, daughter of George F. Saul. He leaves besides his widow, two sons and two daughters, William S., Alexander D., Julie R. and the Rev. Marie H. Jenney. His sons and his elder daughter were partners of their father in the law firm of Jenney & Jenney, and Miss Marie Jenney is a Unitarian minister, now in Des Moines, Ia.

Syracuse, New York
The Herald newspaper
Friday evening, June 29, 1900
Page 16, Column 3


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