Azel Lyman

Azel Lyman

Birth
Lebanon, Grafton County, New Hampshire, USA
Death
3 Jan 1873 (aged 88)
Green Valley, Tazewell County, Illinois, USA
Burial
Green Valley, Tazewell County, Illinois, USA
Memorial ID
66609350 View Source

Son of Abel and Hannah Storrs Lyman. Azel's father was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, he served as a Lieutenant in Capt Joshua Haywards Co. from NH.
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Azel and Mary Paulina are buried in the cemetery adjacent to the church he organized in Green Valley. His land was just south of the church.
They are remembered still and much loved by their descendants. Their gravesite is visited often and flowers are placed in their honor.
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Findagrave member Diane Blair has posted a memorial for Abel Lyman in Brookfield Cemetery. A big hearty THANK YOU to her for this wonderful gift to the Lyman family!
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Exerpt from The Lyman Family, by Lyman S Coleman:

Azel Lyman, born in Lebanon, NH, Aug 1,1784. Before he was two years old his parents moved to Brookfield, Vt. He engaged for a time in teaching school. Then he and his brother Abel bought their fathers tannery and spent some time in the leather business.
He married Roxana Fisk of Brookfield in 1808. She was also engaged in teaching school and was born Dec 22, 1788 and died June 7, 1820. In 1810 he soid his interest in the tannery to his brother Abel and moved to Potsdam, St Lawrence County NY, where he built the 5th dwelling in the village and also another tannery.
In 1812 St Lawrence Academy waas started and he was one of the trustees, which office he held until he moved to Illinois. In 1820 he was appointed deacon of the Prebytereian church and superintendant of the sabbath school.
In 1829-31 he superintended 3 sabbath schools, to which he was obliged to travel 18 miles every Sunday.
In 1830 he married his second wife, Mary P Bates of Potsdam. In 1832 he and his brother John with their horses and carriage went on an exploring expidition to the "far west" and drove to the Mississippi where the city of Alton now stands.
In Sept 1, 1833, with 10 other families he started for Illinois.
Soon after they arrived, they organized a Presbyterian church and he was appointed one of the elders. They also organized a Temperance Society and he was chosen its first president.
In 1835 he spent several months selling Bibles and distributing tracts. In 1836 he was employed by the Illinois Sunday School Union. His field of labor consisted of 35 counties in the southern part of the state. He continued in thsi work for 3 years, organized a great many Sunday Schools and started anew many that had been suspended, and although in a peculiar point of veiw it was an unprofitable business, losing business he felt that he received a rich reward.
In 1851 his dwelling was burned, and he built another and in 1852 sold his farm and purchased another 240 scres in Green Valley, Tazewell County, Illinois.
In 1854 a Presbyterain church was organized and he was appointed an elder. His is now, in 1872, enjoying good health though 87 years old.
Green Valley Ill.
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EARLY SETTLERS OF SANGAMON COUNTY - 1876
By John Carroll Power

LYMAN, AZEL, was born Aug. 1, 1784, at Lebanon, Conn., and was taken by his parents two years later, to Brookfield, Vt. He was married in 1808, in Randolph, Vt., to Roxana Fisk, who was born there, Dec. 12, 1788. They moved to Potsdam, N. Y., in 1810, had three living children, and Mrs. Lyman died there, June 7, 1829. He was married in 1830 at Potsdam, to Mary P. Bates, who was born there, Feb. 2, 1809. They moved to Sangamon county with his four brothers, arriving in 1833, at what is now Farmingdale They had eight children, six of whom were born in Sangamon county. Four only of their children are living. Of his children--

AZEL S., born in New York, married in Cincinnati, Ohio, raised a family, and resides in New York City. He invented a way of making paper from wood, a refrigerating vessel and a historical chart, all of which are valuable.

ROXANA, married, and died in Chicago about the time of the great fire.

MARY is unmarried, and resides with her brother, Azel S., in New York City. She was educated in Jacksonville by Rev. Theron Baldwin.

Children by Mary Paulina:

ELLEN, born April 2, 1831, in Potsdam, N. Y., married in Sangamon county, May 1, 1852, to S. Simonson, who was born March 22, 1824, in Norway. They have one child, and reside at Green Valley, Tazewell county, Illinois.

THERON B. married Miss Mundy, has three children, and lives in Tallula, Menard county.

ALMYRA, married, has two children, and resides with her mother.

OTTO married and resides near Green Valley Postoffice, Tazewell county.

Azel Lyman died Jan. 3, 1873, near Delavan, Ill., and his widow resides there. The family moved from Sangamon to Tazewell county in 1852. Azel Lyman was an active Sunday school worker. He established Sunday schools in thirty-five counties of Illinois.
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About Deacon Azel Lyman
http://www.potsdampublicmuseum.org/subpages/74/85/23/azel-lyman

THE LYMAN EXODUS, 1833

The Lyman Exodus was the result of a wave of religious fervor which swept over the eastern area of the country in the 1830s. In 1833, the American Sunday School Union passed a resolution to put a Sunday School into every place in the Mississippi Valley where one could be sustained.

Responding to this plea was Azel Lyman of Potsdam, who had come here from Vermont in 1810 and who was a founder of the Presbyterian Church. He was a deacon of the church and superintendent of three Sunday Schools in the county, traveling 18 miles each Sunday to teach them.

Deacon Lyman and his four brothers and their families decided to go to Illinois. He interested others in the trip, so on August 22, 1833, a total of 52 people gathered in covered wagons in front of the Liberty Knowles house on Market Street (now Kaplan’s Department Store). Included were 26 adults and 26 children. The trip took nine weeks and one day. The group stopped each Saturday at noon “so that the women could wash and bake and word could be sent to the surrounding area that a Sunday service would be held the following day at 11 o’clock.”

When the group reached Springfield, Illinois, it organized a church and also the first Temperance Society in Illinois. Azel Lyman organized Sunday schools in 35 counties in the southern part of the state. He died in Illinois in 1873.

AN EARLY CUSTOM

Very important was a funeral procession in the early days. There was no hearse; the coffin was borne on the shoulders of the men, while the pall-bearers walked on either side holding the pall which covered it. Those on the street would pause and raise their hats as the procession passed by, preceded by the clergyman – slowly winding its way to the old Knowles burying ground which was at the foot of Willow Street where Potsdam Feed and Coal is now. The first funeral in the “Academy Church” on Union Street was a child of Azel Lyman’s.

Son of Abel and Hannah Storrs Lyman. Azel's father was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, he served as a Lieutenant in Capt Joshua Haywards Co. from NH.
***********
Azel and Mary Paulina are buried in the cemetery adjacent to the church he organized in Green Valley. His land was just south of the church.
They are remembered still and much loved by their descendants. Their gravesite is visited often and flowers are placed in their honor.
***********

Findagrave member Diane Blair has posted a memorial for Abel Lyman in Brookfield Cemetery. A big hearty THANK YOU to her for this wonderful gift to the Lyman family!
************

Exerpt from The Lyman Family, by Lyman S Coleman:

Azel Lyman, born in Lebanon, NH, Aug 1,1784. Before he was two years old his parents moved to Brookfield, Vt. He engaged for a time in teaching school. Then he and his brother Abel bought their fathers tannery and spent some time in the leather business.
He married Roxana Fisk of Brookfield in 1808. She was also engaged in teaching school and was born Dec 22, 1788 and died June 7, 1820. In 1810 he soid his interest in the tannery to his brother Abel and moved to Potsdam, St Lawrence County NY, where he built the 5th dwelling in the village and also another tannery.
In 1812 St Lawrence Academy waas started and he was one of the trustees, which office he held until he moved to Illinois. In 1820 he was appointed deacon of the Prebytereian church and superintendant of the sabbath school.
In 1829-31 he superintended 3 sabbath schools, to which he was obliged to travel 18 miles every Sunday.
In 1830 he married his second wife, Mary P Bates of Potsdam. In 1832 he and his brother John with their horses and carriage went on an exploring expidition to the "far west" and drove to the Mississippi where the city of Alton now stands.
In Sept 1, 1833, with 10 other families he started for Illinois.
Soon after they arrived, they organized a Presbyterian church and he was appointed one of the elders. They also organized a Temperance Society and he was chosen its first president.
In 1835 he spent several months selling Bibles and distributing tracts. In 1836 he was employed by the Illinois Sunday School Union. His field of labor consisted of 35 counties in the southern part of the state. He continued in thsi work for 3 years, organized a great many Sunday Schools and started anew many that had been suspended, and although in a peculiar point of veiw it was an unprofitable business, losing business he felt that he received a rich reward.
In 1851 his dwelling was burned, and he built another and in 1852 sold his farm and purchased another 240 scres in Green Valley, Tazewell County, Illinois.
In 1854 a Presbyterain church was organized and he was appointed an elder. His is now, in 1872, enjoying good health though 87 years old.
Green Valley Ill.
*********

EARLY SETTLERS OF SANGAMON COUNTY - 1876
By John Carroll Power

LYMAN, AZEL, was born Aug. 1, 1784, at Lebanon, Conn., and was taken by his parents two years later, to Brookfield, Vt. He was married in 1808, in Randolph, Vt., to Roxana Fisk, who was born there, Dec. 12, 1788. They moved to Potsdam, N. Y., in 1810, had three living children, and Mrs. Lyman died there, June 7, 1829. He was married in 1830 at Potsdam, to Mary P. Bates, who was born there, Feb. 2, 1809. They moved to Sangamon county with his four brothers, arriving in 1833, at what is now Farmingdale They had eight children, six of whom were born in Sangamon county. Four only of their children are living. Of his children--

AZEL S., born in New York, married in Cincinnati, Ohio, raised a family, and resides in New York City. He invented a way of making paper from wood, a refrigerating vessel and a historical chart, all of which are valuable.

ROXANA, married, and died in Chicago about the time of the great fire.

MARY is unmarried, and resides with her brother, Azel S., in New York City. She was educated in Jacksonville by Rev. Theron Baldwin.

Children by Mary Paulina:

ELLEN, born April 2, 1831, in Potsdam, N. Y., married in Sangamon county, May 1, 1852, to S. Simonson, who was born March 22, 1824, in Norway. They have one child, and reside at Green Valley, Tazewell county, Illinois.

THERON B. married Miss Mundy, has three children, and lives in Tallula, Menard county.

ALMYRA, married, has two children, and resides with her mother.

OTTO married and resides near Green Valley Postoffice, Tazewell county.

Azel Lyman died Jan. 3, 1873, near Delavan, Ill., and his widow resides there. The family moved from Sangamon to Tazewell county in 1852. Azel Lyman was an active Sunday school worker. He established Sunday schools in thirty-five counties of Illinois.
**********************
***********************
About Deacon Azel Lyman
http://www.potsdampublicmuseum.org/subpages/74/85/23/azel-lyman

THE LYMAN EXODUS, 1833

The Lyman Exodus was the result of a wave of religious fervor which swept over the eastern area of the country in the 1830s. In 1833, the American Sunday School Union passed a resolution to put a Sunday School into every place in the Mississippi Valley where one could be sustained.

Responding to this plea was Azel Lyman of Potsdam, who had come here from Vermont in 1810 and who was a founder of the Presbyterian Church. He was a deacon of the church and superintendent of three Sunday Schools in the county, traveling 18 miles each Sunday to teach them.

Deacon Lyman and his four brothers and their families decided to go to Illinois. He interested others in the trip, so on August 22, 1833, a total of 52 people gathered in covered wagons in front of the Liberty Knowles house on Market Street (now Kaplan’s Department Store). Included were 26 adults and 26 children. The trip took nine weeks and one day. The group stopped each Saturday at noon “so that the women could wash and bake and word could be sent to the surrounding area that a Sunday service would be held the following day at 11 o’clock.”

When the group reached Springfield, Illinois, it organized a church and also the first Temperance Society in Illinois. Azel Lyman organized Sunday schools in 35 counties in the southern part of the state. He died in Illinois in 1873.

AN EARLY CUSTOM

Very important was a funeral procession in the early days. There was no hearse; the coffin was borne on the shoulders of the men, while the pall-bearers walked on either side holding the pall which covered it. Those on the street would pause and raise their hats as the procession passed by, preceded by the clergyman – slowly winding its way to the old Knowles burying ground which was at the foot of Willow Street where Potsdam Feed and Coal is now. The first funeral in the “Academy Church” on Union Street was a child of Azel Lyman’s.


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  • Created by: Debra
  • Added: 7 Mar 2011
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 66609350
  • Joyce Hawes
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/66609350/azel-lyman: accessed ), memorial page for Azel Lyman (1 Aug 1784–3 Jan 1873), Find a Grave Memorial ID 66609350, citing Green Valley Cemetery, Green Valley, Tazewell County, Illinois, USA; Maintained by Debra (contributor 47324320) .