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 Fernand Leger

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Fernand Leger Famous memorial

Birth
Argentan, Departement de l'Orne, Basse-Normandie, France
Death
17 Aug 1955 (aged 74)
Gif-sur-Yvette, Departement de l'Essonne, Île-de-France, France
Burial
Gif-sur-Yvette, Departement de l'Essonne, Île-de-France, France
Memorial ID
6626 View Source

Painter and Abstract Artist. After serving an apprenticeship as a draftsman, he moved to Paris in 1900. While working in the trade, he enrolled in the Paris School of Decorative Arts. His "Le Jardin de ma mere" shows the impact of impressionism on his style. However, after viewing the work of Paul Cezanne's in 1907, his work became more geometric. Renting a studio at La Ruche, an artist's settlement near Montparnasse, would bring him into contact with a variety of painters and poets. Through the poets, he was introduced to Cubism and started to steer his work in that direction. But his modification in the use of slabs and cylinders became known as "tubism," as shown in "The Seamstress" and his paintings would grow increasingly abstract. Called into military service in 1914, his war experiences as a military engineer would again color his work. During his mobilization, he would paint "Soldier with a Pipe" and "The Card Party." The latter piece marked the beginning of what would be called his mechanical period. "Three Women" painted in 1921 is considered to be the best example of this style. In 1924, with Amedee Ozenfant he created the Academy Moderne, a free school. He taught here and for many years at a variety of schools including the Sorbonne in Paris and later at Yale University in the United States. His students went on to become painters of renown in their own right. Léger also experimented with other media. In 1926 he conceived, directed, and produced "The Mechanical Ballet," and designed sets for ballets and motion pictures. He created mosaics and stained-glass windows including the mosaic facade of Notre-Dame de Toute-Grâce at Plateau d'Assy, and Sacre-Coeur in Audincourt; a mosaic for the crypt of the American memorial at Bastogne; and a mural for the United Nations building in New York City. In 1935, his work was exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. He remained in the United States, teaching at Yale University during World War II. During that time, "The Tree in the Ladder" and "Romantic Landscape" reflect his interest in the juxtaposition of mechanical elements and the natural world. He also began to incorporate his fascination with the effect caused by New York City's overwhelming use of advertising neon lights. Returning to France in 1945, he joined the French communist party. He continued to produce figure compositions, mosaics and stained glass windows. In 1955 he won the Grand Prize at the São Paulo "Bienal. He would die at home before completing his last commission for the Sao Paolo opera. The Musee Fernard Leger was opened in 1960 in Bio, France. The Guggenheim Museum in New York City also houses of collection of his work.

Painter and Abstract Artist. After serving an apprenticeship as a draftsman, he moved to Paris in 1900. While working in the trade, he enrolled in the Paris School of Decorative Arts. His "Le Jardin de ma mere" shows the impact of impressionism on his style. However, after viewing the work of Paul Cezanne's in 1907, his work became more geometric. Renting a studio at La Ruche, an artist's settlement near Montparnasse, would bring him into contact with a variety of painters and poets. Through the poets, he was introduced to Cubism and started to steer his work in that direction. But his modification in the use of slabs and cylinders became known as "tubism," as shown in "The Seamstress" and his paintings would grow increasingly abstract. Called into military service in 1914, his war experiences as a military engineer would again color his work. During his mobilization, he would paint "Soldier with a Pipe" and "The Card Party." The latter piece marked the beginning of what would be called his mechanical period. "Three Women" painted in 1921 is considered to be the best example of this style. In 1924, with Amedee Ozenfant he created the Academy Moderne, a free school. He taught here and for many years at a variety of schools including the Sorbonne in Paris and later at Yale University in the United States. His students went on to become painters of renown in their own right. Léger also experimented with other media. In 1926 he conceived, directed, and produced "The Mechanical Ballet," and designed sets for ballets and motion pictures. He created mosaics and stained-glass windows including the mosaic facade of Notre-Dame de Toute-Grâce at Plateau d'Assy, and Sacre-Coeur in Audincourt; a mosaic for the crypt of the American memorial at Bastogne; and a mural for the United Nations building in New York City. In 1935, his work was exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. He remained in the United States, teaching at Yale University during World War II. During that time, "The Tree in the Ladder" and "Romantic Landscape" reflect his interest in the juxtaposition of mechanical elements and the natural world. He also began to incorporate his fascination with the effect caused by New York City's overwhelming use of advertising neon lights. Returning to France in 1945, he joined the French communist party. He continued to produce figure compositions, mosaics and stained glass windows. In 1955 he won the Grand Prize at the São Paulo "Bienal. He would die at home before completing his last commission for the Sao Paolo opera. The Musee Fernard Leger was opened in 1960 in Bio, France. The Guggenheim Museum in New York City also houses of collection of his work.

Bio by: Winter Birds PA

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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Added: 13 Oct 1999
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 6626
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/6626/fernand-leger: accessed ), memorial page for Fernand Leger (4 Feb 1881–17 Aug 1955), Find a Grave Memorial ID 6626, citing Cimetière de Gif Sur Yvette, Gif-sur-Yvette, Departement de l'Essonne, Île-de-France, France; Maintained by Find a Grave .