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Alvin Richard Woolworth

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Alvin Richard Woolworth

Birth
Sioux City, Woodbury County, Iowa, USA
Death
23 Jan 2011 (aged 86)
Indian Wells, Riverside County, California, USA
Burial
Cathedral City, Riverside County, California, USA Add to Map
Plot
Faith & Hope Core 2 Wall 9 2 F
Memorial ID
View Source
Son of Dorothy Stevens and Ralph J. Woolworth.

Married Judith Aucoin in 1945
Children:
Lawrence Ralph, Richard Allen

Married Betty McKillop
Children:
Ronald Alvin & Teri Lyn

Obituary from Los Altos Town Crier Feb 8, 2011

A little peice of Los Altos and Los Altos Hills history died with the passing of Al Woolworth of Indian Wells, CA after a long battle with cancer. He was 86.
Mr. Woolworth lived in the los Altos area for approximately 40 years, and played a key role in developing and building luxury-home neighborhoods, as well as commercial properties downtown. But not many people remember Mr. Woolworth's role in securing 13.5 acres and a 24,000 sq.ft., U-shaped building for the hills-Westwind Barn.
Long time friend and real estate agent Charlene Geers said Mr. Woolworth purchased land from the Countess Margit Bessenyey, then owner of the Westwind Barn estate and arrange another deal for the town on the side. "I don't think many people know that he and his then wife, Penny, orchestrated the donation of the Westwind Barn to the town of Los Altos Hills," Greer said.

Born July 12, 1924, to Ralph and Dorothy Stevens in Sioux City, IA, Alvin Richard Woolworth grew up in Olympia, Wash., joining the Army Air Corps in 1943 after graduating from high school. Stationed in Foggia, Italy he served in the 97th Bombardment Group until 1945 and returned to Seattle, where he settled for several years before moving to the Bay Area in 1952. Mr. Woolworth set out on an industrious career in Saratoga, buying and developing properties, later expanding his business to Los Altos and Los Altos Hills. It was in his blood, close friend, business partner and now ex-wife Penny Woolworth said, Mr.Woolworth lived for the excitement of the deal. "I think Al loved land. He loved building and making deals," she said. "When there is love and enjoyment-whatever you do with that is good." Mr. Woolworth would survey land properties, consult with engineers, subdivide plots and develop road, power and sewer systems, Geers said. Some of the properties were sold to developers, others to individuals who wanted to build their own homes and many he developed himself, working with real-estate professionals in Los Altos. He built the homes in the areas of Country Way, Rancho Manuella Lane, Mirmirou Drive, Greenhills Court, Baleri Ranch Lane, Campo Vista Lane, several homes near Westwind and the Manresa townhome neighborhood. His developments ratcheted up the class and prices," said Geers, a Coldwell Banker real estate agend. "His were the first developments in Los Altos Hills to sell for over $75,000 just for the lot". He also build the Spanish-style-motif business offices at 161 and 167 S. San Antonio Rd and the building at 30 Whitney St. Although he had officially retired, it was difficult for Mr. Woolworth to pass an empty plot of land and not be piqued. "He'd drive by a piece of property and say, "That's interesting" said his daughter Teri, who left the the high-tech industry to pursue the passion in real estate her father passed down. He retired to Indian Wells in Coachella Valley. "He loved the desert," Penny said. "He's had homes there since the 70s" But he didn't officially retire. He was always wanting to do a deal. In the dry desert of burgeoning home market, he collaborated with his son Larry and good friend Pam Bishop, another transplant from Los Altos area, who worked with him for several years, brokering his projects. As much as Mr. Woolworth influenced the development of Los Altos and the Hills, Geers and Penny will remember him for encouraging them to co-found their own real estate business, Seville Properties, which they did with five other female partners. "He'd say, you girls should start your own company," Geers said. "Of course, he wanted a tenant for his building." Seville Properties' first office was at 167 S. San Antonio. And because Coldwell Banker now leases the space, Geers and Teri find themselves harbored by a mentor's creation working in those offices. "Isn't that neat- working in the building he built?" Teri said. Mr. Woolworth is survived by his wife Eva, sons Larry of Indian Wells, Richard of Fresno and Ron of Anacortes, Wash.; daughter Teri of Sunnyvale; and 10 grandchildren. Services were held Jan 27. In Mr. Woolworth's memory, the family suggested donations to the American Cancer Society or Odyssey Hospice of Rancho Mirage. Contact Mary Beth Hislop at [email protected]



Grandparents;
James Henry Woolworth
Cecelia Pape Woolworth

Great Grandparents;
James Harvey Woolworth & Dorothy Lloyd
William Pape & Barbara Zeman

Great Grandparents;
James Robert Woolworth & Sarah Maria Yates
Robert E. Lloyd & Catherina Perry
Son of Dorothy Stevens and Ralph J. Woolworth.

Married Judith Aucoin in 1945
Children:
Lawrence Ralph, Richard Allen

Married Betty McKillop
Children:
Ronald Alvin & Teri Lyn

Obituary from Los Altos Town Crier Feb 8, 2011

A little peice of Los Altos and Los Altos Hills history died with the passing of Al Woolworth of Indian Wells, CA after a long battle with cancer. He was 86.
Mr. Woolworth lived in the los Altos area for approximately 40 years, and played a key role in developing and building luxury-home neighborhoods, as well as commercial properties downtown. But not many people remember Mr. Woolworth's role in securing 13.5 acres and a 24,000 sq.ft., U-shaped building for the hills-Westwind Barn.
Long time friend and real estate agent Charlene Geers said Mr. Woolworth purchased land from the Countess Margit Bessenyey, then owner of the Westwind Barn estate and arrange another deal for the town on the side. "I don't think many people know that he and his then wife, Penny, orchestrated the donation of the Westwind Barn to the town of Los Altos Hills," Greer said.

Born July 12, 1924, to Ralph and Dorothy Stevens in Sioux City, IA, Alvin Richard Woolworth grew up in Olympia, Wash., joining the Army Air Corps in 1943 after graduating from high school. Stationed in Foggia, Italy he served in the 97th Bombardment Group until 1945 and returned to Seattle, where he settled for several years before moving to the Bay Area in 1952. Mr. Woolworth set out on an industrious career in Saratoga, buying and developing properties, later expanding his business to Los Altos and Los Altos Hills. It was in his blood, close friend, business partner and now ex-wife Penny Woolworth said, Mr.Woolworth lived for the excitement of the deal. "I think Al loved land. He loved building and making deals," she said. "When there is love and enjoyment-whatever you do with that is good." Mr. Woolworth would survey land properties, consult with engineers, subdivide plots and develop road, power and sewer systems, Geers said. Some of the properties were sold to developers, others to individuals who wanted to build their own homes and many he developed himself, working with real-estate professionals in Los Altos. He built the homes in the areas of Country Way, Rancho Manuella Lane, Mirmirou Drive, Greenhills Court, Baleri Ranch Lane, Campo Vista Lane, several homes near Westwind and the Manresa townhome neighborhood. His developments ratcheted up the class and prices," said Geers, a Coldwell Banker real estate agend. "His were the first developments in Los Altos Hills to sell for over $75,000 just for the lot". He also build the Spanish-style-motif business offices at 161 and 167 S. San Antonio Rd and the building at 30 Whitney St. Although he had officially retired, it was difficult for Mr. Woolworth to pass an empty plot of land and not be piqued. "He'd drive by a piece of property and say, "That's interesting" said his daughter Teri, who left the the high-tech industry to pursue the passion in real estate her father passed down. He retired to Indian Wells in Coachella Valley. "He loved the desert," Penny said. "He's had homes there since the 70s" But he didn't officially retire. He was always wanting to do a deal. In the dry desert of burgeoning home market, he collaborated with his son Larry and good friend Pam Bishop, another transplant from Los Altos area, who worked with him for several years, brokering his projects. As much as Mr. Woolworth influenced the development of Los Altos and the Hills, Geers and Penny will remember him for encouraging them to co-found their own real estate business, Seville Properties, which they did with five other female partners. "He'd say, you girls should start your own company," Geers said. "Of course, he wanted a tenant for his building." Seville Properties' first office was at 167 S. San Antonio. And because Coldwell Banker now leases the space, Geers and Teri find themselves harbored by a mentor's creation working in those offices. "Isn't that neat- working in the building he built?" Teri said. Mr. Woolworth is survived by his wife Eva, sons Larry of Indian Wells, Richard of Fresno and Ron of Anacortes, Wash.; daughter Teri of Sunnyvale; and 10 grandchildren. Services were held Jan 27. In Mr. Woolworth's memory, the family suggested donations to the American Cancer Society or Odyssey Hospice of Rancho Mirage. Contact Mary Beth Hislop at [email protected]



Grandparents;
James Henry Woolworth
Cecelia Pape Woolworth

Great Grandparents;
James Harvey Woolworth & Dorothy Lloyd
William Pape & Barbara Zeman

Great Grandparents;
James Robert Woolworth & Sarah Maria Yates
Robert E. Lloyd & Catherina Perry

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