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 Floyd Donald Olson

Floyd Donald Olson

Birth
Burley, Cassia County, Idaho, USA
Death 10 Oct 1974 (aged 62)
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, USA
Burial Midvale, Salt Lake County, Utah, USA
Plot A, 121, 8
Memorial ID 65438 · View Source
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I was born 13 Feb 1912 in Burley, Cassia, Idaho. I was the second in the family of nine children. I was the son of Charles M. Olson and Alice Almira Gransbury. I was raised on a far four miles southeast of Burley, Idaho, which my father homesteaded and developed from sagebrush. We belonged to the Unity Ward in the Burley Stake. I graduated from high school in 1930. I excelled in mathematics and science subjects. When I was in high school, we started raising purebred pigs and exhibiting them in the fairs in the fall. From 1927 to 1937, we believe that we won more prizes than any other swine growers in the eleven western states, showing our hogs each fall in Montana, Idaho, Utah, and sometimes in California, Oregon, and Washington. On 13 Jan. 1934, I married Violet June Tripp of Burley. Our first daughter, Shirley, was born 6 Nov. 1934. We farmed until 1937. During 1937, I worked as a flour packer in the Burley Flour Mills. Nadine was born 15 Oct. 1935, and Carrol was born 30 July 1937. On 25 Feb. 1938, we moved to Tremonton, Utah, and started a tire repair business. About this same time, Violet’s parents moved to Winnemucca, Nevada, and started a tire business. During the summer, they moved back to Utah; and we worked together for a while. In September of that year, we moved to Richfield, Utah, and started a new tire shop and left Violet’s parents in Tremonton. The next April, Violet’s parents moved to Richfield. We worked with the Tripps until December. Between Christmas and New Years, we moved back to Tremonton, Utah (1940). Mary Anita was born June 11, 1940. In Tremonton, we lived in a converted chicken coop on an alley. We lived in one end and had our tire shop in the other. We stayed there all of that year. That fall we got a chance to buy a lot; so we bought it and started to build a tire shop during the winter of 1940-41. While we were building the tire shop, we got a chance to buy a home right next to it for $1,250.00. Incidentally, we only paid $46.00 interest on that home when we had the payments completed. The War started 7 Dec. 1941; and the next summer, about in May, I received a call for a six-month mission in the Texas Mission. During the last nine weeks of my mission, my wife came out and served as my companion. We had four children at this time. We returned home just at Christmas time in 1942.
At this time I took a job with the O.K. Rubber Welders system out of Denver as a salesman. During the next year, I traveled 30,000 miles in 24 of the states; and I seldom saw my family. By fall I was very sick of being away from home so much. In October, I quit the job and moved to Salt Lake City, Utah, while my wife was in the hospital with a new baby girl (Geraldine). In Salt Lake, I went into business with my brother, Carl. At this time, my brother Neal was running our business in Tremonton; and, eventually, we sold it to two fellows who worked for us. We moved to 990 Princeton Avenue in Salt Lake City, Utah; then, in about sixteen months, we moved to 3080 South 1423 East, where we lived for eight months. Finally, in December of 1945, we moved to 7701 South 7th East in Sandy, Utah (Union Ward). We had five acres of land, some cows, pigs, horses and a big barn. The kids had a lot of fun. While we were there, business went to pot. We went bankrupt and lost everything. It was necessary to sell our home, pay off our debts, and move to Crescent, 12th East 10600 South, on 13 May 1948. Dorothy was born while we were at 3080 South 1423 East on 8 May 1945. Barbara was born just before we left our home at 7701 South 7th East. Floyd Tripp Olson, our first son, was born while we were at 7701 South 7th East on 30 Nov. 1946. He passed away on 31 March 1947. Carl Tripp Olson was born while we were at Crescent on 15 May 1951. We lived there until 27 April 1952, when we moved to Moreland, Idaho, where we lived until 2 April 1955, when we moved to 335 Horrocks Drive, Blackfoot, Idaho. Kathleen was born while we were in Moreland, Idaho. We lived in Blackfoot, Idaho, until 17 October 1956, when we moved to Murray, Utah, to 421 East 6270 South. It was here that Kenneth Tripp Olson was born. While we were in Crescent (Sandy), we re-established our tire business, bought the property we were on, and, by the spring of 1952, thought we had enough money to retire from the tire business and go into dry farming which had been my life-long ambition. However, three dry years in a row put an end to that ambition as well as losing all of the money we had. So, in the fall of 1954, I started selling electric heat. This was the business that took us to the new home in Blackfoot and eventually brought us to the house in Salt Lake until the present time. Although we have not yet made any money, we have had some very good experience rooting a company, pioneering, and have actually discovered a principle in heating engineering that is still very controversial. But it has resulted in our being featured in seven national magazine articles and has made us known throughout the United States in this field. When I returned from my mission in Tremonton, I had the privilege of serving on the Stake Genealogical Committee, and one of the presidents of the 70’s quorums. When we moved to Salt Lake in the Princeton Ward, I was district president in the Stake Mission. When we moved from there to the Wilford Ward, I served as a teacher of the Gospel Doctrine Class and, later, counselor in the Superintendency of the Sunday School. When we moved to the Union Ward (Second), I served as a Sunday School teacher, Mutual teacher, and was in charge of the Aaronic Priesthood over 21, and Floyd as a Missionary in Texas in 1942, Age 30 Floyd Olson - 4 eventually became second counselor in the Bishopric. When we moved to Crescent, I served as Special Interest Class leader in Mutual, as a counselor in the Mutual Superintendency, group secretary of the High Priest Quorum, and as a member of the Senior Aaronic Committee. In Moreland, I served as superintendent of the Mutual and instructor of the Senior Aaronic Priesthood class in Priesthood Meeting. Later, as chairman of the Genealogical Committee. In Blackfoot, I served as general secretary of the Senior Aaronic Priesthood Committee. Soon after we moved to Murray, I was put in as first counselor in the Bishopric, and 30 July 1961, was sustained as President of the Priests Quorum (Bishop of the Murray 14th Ward, Murray South Stake). (In 1935, I served as superintendent of the Mutual in the Unity Ward. In 1929, I started as Scout Master. During most of the time in between, I was Scout Master, Sunday School teacher, and Priest leader to the same group of boys. Most of these boys have served in Bishoprics or as Bishops.) In 1969, we learned that I had cancer of the lymph glands in the upper part of my body. After 33 treatments of colbalt and many days of being very ill, I began to feel better. I took the business over again; and things went well until two years later. I again had cancer of the lymph glands in the lower part of my body. I had 36 colbalt treatments this time and was very ill from them. In the fall of 1972, we decided to move to a farm and try an experiment of feeding pigs rye. We moved to Lehi, Utah, in October of 1972; and in May of 1973, I had the Shingles in my back. Realizing that I was not going to be able to do this experiment, I went to Dr. Nelson of the Brigham Young University Agricultural Science Department. He listened while I explained what I had wanted to do and why I could not do it. He then went ahead with this experiment using two pens of five pigs each. We were fortunate enough to buy six of these ten pigs so that most of our family had half a rye-fed pork that year. I did not have the opportunity to check back to see the results of this experiment. In September, we learned that I had cancer again and decided that the seven acres was more than we could handle along with our electric heat business; so we sold our farm and moved back to 421 East 6270 South, Murray, Utah. The cancer was under control until May of 1974, when complications began to develop.

On 10 October 1974, Floyd D. Olson passed away.


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  • Maintained by: Burt
  • Originally Created by: Utah State Historical Society
  • Added: 2 Feb 2000
  • Find A Grave Memorial 65438
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Floyd Donald Olson (13 Feb 1912–10 Oct 1974), Find A Grave Memorial no. 65438, citing Midvale City Cemetery, Midvale, Salt Lake County, Utah, USA ; Maintained by Burt (contributor 46867609) .