Advertisement

 John Julius Izard Pringle

Advertisement

John Julius Izard Pringle

Birth
Death
11 Mar 1864 (aged 56)
Burial
Rome, Città Metropolitana di Roma Capitale, Lazio, Italy
Plot
624 Zona Prima
Memorial ID
64524102 View Source

John Julius Izard Pringle married Jane Lynch of New York, and lived at his plantation "Greenfield," six miles up the Black River from "White House", where his mother lived with her second husband, Joel Roberts Poinsett. Life at "White House," or "Casa Bianca" as it was called by Mr. Poinsett, is described by Frederica Bremer in 'The Homes of the Nero World', 1, 255-305: "A fine old couple, Mr. Poinsett and his lady, who remind me of Philemon and Baucis, live here quite alone in the midst of negro slaves, rice plantations, and wild, sandy forest land." Miss Bremer, who was most interested in the lot of slaves, finds much to comment on in this connection, little unfavorable to her host. The snipe bog was famous at "White House,' and J.J. Izard Pringle is said to have been a famous shot." In April 1861, 'White Hall," by then the home of J. J. Izard Pringle, was visited by a British newspaper correspondent, William Howard Russell, who reported that Mrs. Pringle and the children were in Europe and Mr. Pringle anxious to join them." He did get to Europe but died in Rome March 10, 1862. His three sons, who were snidying in Heidelburg at the time of their father's death, immediately hurried back to South Carolina to enter the army. Landing in the North, by July 1862 they were at home after many adventures getting through the lines. They "walked, waded, rowed in boats, if boats they could find; swam rivers when boats there were none; brave lads are they." Mrs. Pringle and her daughter soon followed, they too being spirited over the lines. Jane Lynch Pringle died August 9, 1896, at Dinard, France, in her eighty-sixth year.
(bio by sticksandstones)

John Julius Izard Pringle married Jane Lynch of New York, and lived at his plantation "Greenfield," six miles up the Black River from "White House", where his mother lived with her second husband, Joel Roberts Poinsett. Life at "White House," or "Casa Bianca" as it was called by Mr. Poinsett, is described by Frederica Bremer in 'The Homes of the Nero World', 1, 255-305: "A fine old couple, Mr. Poinsett and his lady, who remind me of Philemon and Baucis, live here quite alone in the midst of negro slaves, rice plantations, and wild, sandy forest land." Miss Bremer, who was most interested in the lot of slaves, finds much to comment on in this connection, little unfavorable to her host. The snipe bog was famous at "White House,' and J.J. Izard Pringle is said to have been a famous shot." In April 1861, 'White Hall," by then the home of J. J. Izard Pringle, was visited by a British newspaper correspondent, William Howard Russell, who reported that Mrs. Pringle and the children were in Europe and Mr. Pringle anxious to join them." He did get to Europe but died in Rome March 10, 1862. His three sons, who were snidying in Heidelburg at the time of their father's death, immediately hurried back to South Carolina to enter the army. Landing in the North, by July 1862 they were at home after many adventures getting through the lines. They "walked, waded, rowed in boats, if boats they could find; swam rivers when boats there were none; brave lads are they." Mrs. Pringle and her daughter soon followed, they too being spirited over the lines. Jane Lynch Pringle died August 9, 1896, at Dinard, France, in her eighty-sixth year.
(bio by sticksandstones)


Family Members

Parents
Spouse

Flowers

In their memory
Plant Memorial Trees

Advertisement