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 John Jacob Glessner

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John Jacob Glessner

Birth
Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio, USA
Death 20 Jan 1936 (aged 92)
Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA
Burial Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA
Memorial ID 6422 View Source
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Chicago-area merchant. He became a vice president of International Harvester. His home, on Prairie Avenue in Chicago across from the Kimball Mansion, is an architectural landmark, designed by H.H. Richardson of Boston.

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J. J. GLESSNER IS DEAD IN CHICAGO
Former Springfield Manufacturer Succumbs

Funeral services for John J. Glessner, 92, a former local resident, and, at one time, a member of the firm of Warder, Bushnell and Glessner, succeeded by The International Harvester Co., who died at 4 a.m. Monday at his home in Chicago, will be held at the residence Wednesday afternoon, and also at the chapel of the Graceland Cemetery, of Chicago, where burial will be made.
Mr. Glessner, more than a half-century ago, was one of the members of the firm of Warder, Bushnell and Glessner, which manufactured farm machinery at the plant now occupied by The International Harvester Co. He lived in Springfield for a number of years, and married a local girl, Miss Frances McBeth, in Springfield. Mrs. Glessner died in 1932.
Born in Zanesville, O., on Jan. 26, 1843, he was educated in the Zanesville public schools, and came to Springfield when a young man. With Asa Bushnell and Benjamin Warder, he entered into the farm implement manufacturing business, and several years later, went to Chicago to represent the firm there.
When The International Harvester Co. was founded in 1902, it purchased the firm of Warder, Bushnell and Glessner, and Mr. Glessner became first vice president of The international Harvester Co. He served in that capacity until 1919, when he was named a director. He was a director of the company at the time of his death.
Mr. and Mrs. Glessner had been leaders in Chicago social circles for nearly 60 years. Their home, located at the southwest corner of 18th st. and Prairie av., has been a landmark of the older Chicago southside residential district for more than 50 years. In 1934, Mr. Glessner announced that this home would be given as a gift to the American Institute of Architects on his death.
In 1898 he became a member of the board of trustees of the Russ Medical College, and in 1908, was made president of the board. He became president-emeritus of the school in 1933. Mr. Glessner was also a former president of the Citizens Association, a director of the Chicago Relief and Aid Society for 15 years, and a trustee of the Chicago Orphan Asylum, the Chicago Orchestral Association and the Chicago Art Institute. He was a member of the Commercial, Chicago, Union League, Quadrangle, Chicago Literary, Cliff Dwellers and Caxton Clubs. In addition to the Prairie av. house, he maintained a residence at Littleton, N. H.
The Prairie av. House, built of granite, was designed by the late Henry H. Richardson, of Boston, regarded as one of the greatest American architects of the 19th century. When the American Institute of Architects, through its Chicago affiliate, the Chicago Architects Club, takes over the residence, it will be known as the “Glessner House,” and will be used for the institute’s library and administration headquarters. When to house was built in 1882, many of the Glessner’s friends, including the George M. Pullmans, the Marshall Fields, the W. W. Kimballs, and the elder Philip Armours, lived within a radius if a few blocks.
Mr. Glessner leaves his daughter Mrs. Frances Glessner Lee, of Littleton, N. H. A son, John G. M. Glessner died in 1929.
Mr. and Mrs. Glessner had many friends in Springfield, some of whom visited them in Chicago in recent years.
Copied from the Springfield, Ohio Daily News, Tuesday, January 21, 1936.


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