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 Lawrence Ross Walker

Lawrence Ross Walker

Birth
Pleasant Grove, Utah County, Utah, USA
Death 27 Feb 1954 (aged 69)
American Fork, Utah County, Utah, USA
Burial Pleasant Grove, Utah County, Utah, USA
Plot B-33-006-01
Memorial ID 64209 · View Source
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Son of Appollos Benjamin Walker and Sarah Jane Holman

Husband of Dahlia Albertina Radmall, married 24 Nov 1909 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA


Lawrence Ross Walker, son of Appollos Benjamin Walker and Sarah Jane Holman, was born Mar. 26, 1884 at Lindon, three miles south of Pleasant Grove, Utah. He was the fifth child in a family of seven.
His parents had moved to Lindon from Pleasant Grove some two years before he was born. They had moved into the east part of town and their nearest neighbor was a mile and a half away. There was no water either on the land or in it. Work was commenced directly after they moved here on a canal. Water had to be hauled from a reservoir about a half mile fromtheir home. This reserviour was on land where water could be had and each time it was their turn to take the water, they filled it. This amount would last until the next time it was their turn to take it.
There were no buggies, wells, eletric lights, telephone, bathrooms, automobiles, airplanes or radios, and so they lived and enjoyed things in a different way than we do. Their home was a two-roomed house at first but the parents were justly proud of it as it was their own. In the summertime all the children went barefooted but on Sunday, shoes and little plaid suits were provided.
Their food was somewhat different,too. In the wintertime the only vegetables were potatoes and onions. They didn;t have any fruit trees at first and as he was very fond of apples, he was always glad to over to Uncle Rob Thorne's. He always had a cellar full of apples during the winter time. Many times in the winter the usual meal at night was bread, nilk, onions and baked potatoes. There was always plenty of milk, butter and usually honey and meat.
When he was seven, his father left for a mission to Indiana. He was the father, left his wife and seven children. The oldest child was fourteen and the youngest four. While the father was gone, the family worked together and very successfully kept themselves.
His Grandmother became ill and his father was called home after a year and a half of missionary service.
He was seven when he started school. He liked school as well as most boys and particularly liked arithmetic, spelling and history. He went to Pleasant Grove in the 5th grade. Back to Lindon for the 6th, then he finsihed the 7th and 8th grades in Pleasant Grive and graduated in 1902.
In the fall of that year, he went to the University of Utah to continue his education. The next summer he worked at Olmstead at the mouth of Provo Canyon helping build a power plant. He worked with a team for six weeks and earned over a hundred dollars. That summer, his father decided that it would be too much of a burdento send them all through the Engineers Course as it would take six years at the U to complete the course. The plans were changed to a Normal Course.
During the following summer, he worked at the powe plant in Pleasant Grove. That fall, he started with the boys again in school, but he was only there two weeks when he had to come home because of illness. He came home on the train to Pleasant Grove on the 1st of October. From there he called his folks' place. His illness was diagnosed by Sister Sophia Culmer as typhoid fever. For weeks his life hung inthe balance and no one knew whether life or death woul dhave the upper hand. But his life was spared perhaps for greater things. He had to learn to walk again. This illness seemed to clean his whole system out. He felt as if he had new blood, new life.
The next fall he resumed his studies and finished his Normal course, in June of 1907. That summer he worked for his brother, James H., who lived in "Monkey Town" of Pleasant Grove. It was while he was working there that he came to the realization that Miss Dahlia Radmall was alive. They had seen each other many times but this was the first time that they were conscious of each other. That fall he began his life as a pedagog by teaching in the 7th grade at Pleasant Grove. The next year he taught the 5th and 6th grades at Lindon. He was the Principal. He also taught there the folowing year.
He and Dahlia Rumall were untied in the holy bonds of matrimony at the Salt Lake Temple on Nov. 24, 19909, the both received their endowmnets that same day.
At this time o fhis marriage, he was teaching Mutual.
On Feb. 3, 1910 his father wohad been ill for a month, passed away. that year saw the close of his teaching career. His mother wanted him to take over the farm. This seemed to be more nearly his niche in life for he loved the outdoors. At this time, too he commenced working with a capital "W". In Nov 1911, the moved into their own home. Their first child, Grace was born while they were living at his folk's place and about this time he was put in President of the Mutual. Jan 23 1913 their second child Jennie was born, he always called her his "little lop-eared rabbit."
In 1914 the war broke out. He bought liberty bonds. Money was rahter plentiful but everything was high. Grant was born 1915 and Leon born Nov 1917. The Armistice was signed Nov. 11, 1918.
In 1916 he was put in the Council of the 135th Quorum of Seventies, he acted as Secretary for 8 years and Senior Presidnet for 4 years. In 1918 he bought his first car, it was a Maxwell, it had been a demonstrator's car and never did run very well.
While serving on the jury at Provo in 1919, he came down with the "flu", this disease seemed to be aftermath of the war and took a great toll of strong healthy people. He suffered from flu for a month and pneumonia and pleurisy set in. He was in bed for three months and has never been a vigorous worker, he had to adjust to this new condition. If he had not been a careful observer of the "Word of Wisdon", the doctor said he would have been called to the great beyond. In 1922 he bought a Ford sedan. In 1923 he worked inthe Senate Chamber while the Legislature was in session. And in 1924, the Ward of Lindon was incorporated, he and Uncle Ben contracted for a mile and a half of trench digging. In 1927 he served as a docket clerk in the State Senate. He worked again whilte the Legislature was in session in 1927, 1929, 1930- a special session and in 1931.
He enjoyed temple work and did a lot of it. He was thoroughly converted to its importance.
As a farmer, the crops he raised most successfully were sugar beets, alfalfa and wheat. He never took an interest in small fruits and vegetables.

The foregoing history was written and compiled by his daughter Grace Walker Fielding.

The following is dad's life history brought up-to-date by himself- Apr 28, 1944.

Nov 20, 1943 I started to work at the Steel Plant. I worked onthe track that hauled the lumber for the construction of the building at the plant. I worked all day shift until May. Then I laid off a week to help plant the tomatoes. When I went back I started to work on night shift. I stayed on the job until July 6, and then stopped to work on a canal. It was too much for the boys. Usual spring routine begun with the boys taking over the farmwork. I got work as an oiler on a dragline operated by Paul Strate on the Murdock Canal. In August I brusied one of my legs and a few days later was stricken with fliebitis in the other leg. This necessitated going to bed with hot packs applied every half hour. after 10 days the doctor said I might use it again, it was better, but from that day on I was never free of some pressure. I was in the High Council at the time and enjoyed my work very much. On hte next visit to the doctor I was definitely ordered off the farm so we began house hunting in Pleasant Grove. Mother & I had always talked and planned on moving to Pleasant Grove when our says on the farm were over. We wanted to find a place close enough to town so that we could walk to the store and church. House hunting in Pleasant Grove seemed futile so arrangements were made to purchase Elroy's home in Vineyard so we moved to Vineyard on July 4, 1945. I was under the doctor's care all the time and felt quite useless- felt fair if I didn't do much.
We finally found ahome in Plesant Grove, the Smith home, which was only a block from the post office and seemed to suit our purpose very well. Mother was satisifed as it had three bedrooms. So we moved up there on May 29, 1947, we took our livestock with us and Mother & I went into the "Dairy Business."
We visited with friends and relatives in Michigan, Indiana and Denver, and saw many, many new and exciting places and met a lot of the people who had been good to our boy in the missionfield. This was truly a dream come true for me as I had wanted to meet the Michigan Walkers all my life.
I had a serious goiter operation and felt some better after but seemed I could never quite find myself. I was fortunate to get in as Minute Clerk at a Special State Legislature. Luke Clegg, Senator from Provo, was very considerate of me, giving me a lift whenever possible. I tried to enjoy my work as I had always done when I was there before, but seemed I could never quite get the spirit of it. I told Mother I would never try it again.

On the 26th of Feb 1954, Lawrence took a stroke at 2:30 am and on the 27th at the American Fork Hospital, I (Dahlia) was called to part with my companion and husband of over forty years. It was a terrible shock, his sudeen passing but as tragedy and sorrow have always been part of my life- I tried to take it in its stride, and as reason soon otook over, I acknowledged the hand of the Lord in his passing.







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  • Maintained by: SRBentz
  • Originally Created by: Utah State Historical Society
  • Added: 2 Feb 2000
  • Find A Grave Memorial 64209
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Lawrence Ross Walker (26 Mar 1884–27 Feb 1954), Find A Grave Memorial no. 64209, citing Pleasant Grove City Cemetery, Pleasant Grove, Utah County, Utah, USA ; Maintained by SRBentz (contributor 47051679) .