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 Howard Clayton Knotts

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Howard Clayton Knotts

Birth
Girard, Macoupin County, Illinois, USA
Death
23 Nov 1942 (aged 47)
Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois, USA
Burial
Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois, USA
Memorial ID
63523406 View Source

Howard C. Knotts,flying ace of WWI and nationally known authority on aeronautical law, died at his home November 23, 1942 aged 47. He was born in Girard, IL on August 25, 1895, the son of Edward and Mary Elizabeth, nee Routzahn Knotts. Mr. Knotts attended Blackburn College, Knox College and Harvard University, graduating in 1917.
Mr. Knotts enlisted in the Air Corps in July 1917, and after training was sent to England, then on to the fighting front in France. He was officially credited with shooting down 8 German planes and an additional 4 were not verified. He was shot down behind the German lines on October 14, 1918 and remained a prisoner until he and other prisoners were left behind by the fleeing German army in early November. Due to his injuries he was hospitalized in Belgium for several months.
Mr. Knotts was united in marriage to Miss Charlotte Sterling in Springfield on June 25, 1921. He is survived by two children, Howard, and Elizabeth Knotts.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Second Lieutenant (Air Service) Howard Clayton Knotts, United States Army Air Service, for extraordinary heroism in action while serving with 17th Aero Squadron, 4th Pursuit Group, U.S. Army Air Service, A.E.F., near Arieux, France, 17 September 1918. During a patrol flight 5 American planes were attacked by 20 enemy Fokkers. During the combat, when Lieutenant Knotts saw one of his comrades attacked by 7 enemy planes and in imminent danger of being shot down, he, although himself engaged with the enemy, went to the assistance of his comrade and attacked 2 of his immediate pursuers. In the fight which ensued he shot 1 of the enemy down in flames and forced the other out of control. His prompt act enabled his comrade to escape destruction, although his comrade's plane was so disabled that he made the allied lines with difficulty, crashing as he landed.

Howard C. Knotts,flying ace of WWI and nationally known authority on aeronautical law, died at his home November 23, 1942 aged 47. He was born in Girard, IL on August 25, 1895, the son of Edward and Mary Elizabeth, nee Routzahn Knotts. Mr. Knotts attended Blackburn College, Knox College and Harvard University, graduating in 1917.
Mr. Knotts enlisted in the Air Corps in July 1917, and after training was sent to England, then on to the fighting front in France. He was officially credited with shooting down 8 German planes and an additional 4 were not verified. He was shot down behind the German lines on October 14, 1918 and remained a prisoner until he and other prisoners were left behind by the fleeing German army in early November. Due to his injuries he was hospitalized in Belgium for several months.
Mr. Knotts was united in marriage to Miss Charlotte Sterling in Springfield on June 25, 1921. He is survived by two children, Howard, and Elizabeth Knotts.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Second Lieutenant (Air Service) Howard Clayton Knotts, United States Army Air Service, for extraordinary heroism in action while serving with 17th Aero Squadron, 4th Pursuit Group, U.S. Army Air Service, A.E.F., near Arieux, France, 17 September 1918. During a patrol flight 5 American planes were attacked by 20 enemy Fokkers. During the combat, when Lieutenant Knotts saw one of his comrades attacked by 7 enemy planes and in imminent danger of being shot down, he, although himself engaged with the enemy, went to the assistance of his comrade and attacked 2 of his immediate pursuers. In the fight which ensued he shot 1 of the enemy down in flames and forced the other out of control. His prompt act enabled his comrade to escape destruction, although his comrade's plane was so disabled that he made the allied lines with difficulty, crashing as he landed.


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