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Frank V Szasz

Birth
Budapest, Belváros-Lipótváros, Budapest, Hungary
Death
10 Mar 1995 (aged 69)
Kansas City, Wyandotte County, Kansas, USA
Burial
Burial Details Unknown Add to Map
Memorial ID
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Frank was born on August 1, 1925 and passed away on Friday, March 10, 1995.

Frank was last known to be living in Kansas City, Missouri.


Frank V. Szasz, 69, Kansas City, MO., died March 10, 1995, at KU Medical Center. A memorial service will be announced at a later date. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests contributions to The Center for Global Community, 3728 Holmes, KC,MO., 64109. Mr. Szasz, a noted portrait painter, came to the United States in 1957, at the time of the Hungarian Revolution. Joyce Hall brought him from New York to Kansas City to join the art staff at Hallmark Cards. He also taught painting at the Kansas City Art Institute and Rockhurst College. He painted many noted people and heads of state, including four American presidents, Albert Einstein, Anwar Sadat, Albert Schweitzer, Eleanor Roosevelt, Mother Teresa and Pope John Paul II. He also developed the Pathmarker Series of portraits of visionary leaders. He is survived by his wife Helge Szasz, of the home; three cousins, Uri Taenzer, of Philadelphia, PA, Erwin Taenzer, of Boston, MA, Endre Szasz, of Budapest, Hungary and nephew Gabi Dylag, also of Budapest, Hungary.

Frank was born in Budapest. He was in his mid teens during World War II. He was offered a flight out of Hungary but wouldn't go as it would mean leaving his mother behind. He feels this was especially the right move as the plane crashed and he would have been killed.
Frank worked on an underground resistance newspaper but was captured and sent to a work camp (I don't think he ever gave me the name of the camp). He was able to escape after a while and made his way back to Budapest but could not cross the river for 3 days because of the intensity of the fighting. He resumed his resistance work.
When the Russians came to Hungary, he was captured and sent to a camp in Siberia. There he and another prisoner kept people's spirits up by singing arias from operas. After 3 years, he was able to escape again.
When Hungary was in the midst of the revolution and was invaded by Russia, he knew that if he stayed he would be sent back to a camp. He was able to contact an uncle in America who sent him money to come here with his mother.


He was married and divorced at least twice and was survived by a son (?Paul and that he lived in California). Although he is known for his realistic style of painting, he was a great admirer of the impressionists and painted a portrait of his son in that style. He liked that best, but painted what would sell. He did a great portrait of Queen Noor of Jordan. He is better known abroad than in this country. He did the original oils of the posters that everyone has seen, of famous people on black backgrounds. He claimed that he was never paid for that work. He had a large portrait of his mother over his mantle.

Frank sort of cobbled together a living by teaching and doing portraits. He wasn't a good fit with the structure of the Hallmark company, not surprising considering his very difficult coming-of-age years. He lived for the last years of his life in Leawood, Kansas, marrying a final time.


Frank was born on August 1, 1925 and passed away on Friday, March 10, 1995.

Frank was last known to be living in Kansas City, Missouri.


Frank V. Szasz, 69, Kansas City, MO., died March 10, 1995, at KU Medical Center. A memorial service will be announced at a later date. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests contributions to The Center for Global Community, 3728 Holmes, KC,MO., 64109. Mr. Szasz, a noted portrait painter, came to the United States in 1957, at the time of the Hungarian Revolution. Joyce Hall brought him from New York to Kansas City to join the art staff at Hallmark Cards. He also taught painting at the Kansas City Art Institute and Rockhurst College. He painted many noted people and heads of state, including four American presidents, Albert Einstein, Anwar Sadat, Albert Schweitzer, Eleanor Roosevelt, Mother Teresa and Pope John Paul II. He also developed the Pathmarker Series of portraits of visionary leaders. He is survived by his wife Helge Szasz, of the home; three cousins, Uri Taenzer, of Philadelphia, PA, Erwin Taenzer, of Boston, MA, Endre Szasz, of Budapest, Hungary and nephew Gabi Dylag, also of Budapest, Hungary.

Frank was born in Budapest. He was in his mid teens during World War II. He was offered a flight out of Hungary but wouldn't go as it would mean leaving his mother behind. He feels this was especially the right move as the plane crashed and he would have been killed.
Frank worked on an underground resistance newspaper but was captured and sent to a work camp (I don't think he ever gave me the name of the camp). He was able to escape after a while and made his way back to Budapest but could not cross the river for 3 days because of the intensity of the fighting. He resumed his resistance work.
When the Russians came to Hungary, he was captured and sent to a camp in Siberia. There he and another prisoner kept people's spirits up by singing arias from operas. After 3 years, he was able to escape again.
When Hungary was in the midst of the revolution and was invaded by Russia, he knew that if he stayed he would be sent back to a camp. He was able to contact an uncle in America who sent him money to come here with his mother.


He was married and divorced at least twice and was survived by a son (?Paul and that he lived in California). Although he is known for his realistic style of painting, he was a great admirer of the impressionists and painted a portrait of his son in that style. He liked that best, but painted what would sell. He did a great portrait of Queen Noor of Jordan. He is better known abroad than in this country. He did the original oils of the posters that everyone has seen, of famous people on black backgrounds. He claimed that he was never paid for that work. He had a large portrait of his mother over his mantle.

Frank sort of cobbled together a living by teaching and doing portraits. He wasn't a good fit with the structure of the Hallmark company, not surprising considering his very difficult coming-of-age years. He lived for the last years of his life in Leawood, Kansas, marrying a final time.



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