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 Samuel Seabury

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Samuel Seabury Famous memorial

Birth
New York, New York County (Manhattan), New York, USA
Death
7 May 1958 (aged 85)
East Hampton, Suffolk County, New York, USA
Burial
Manhattan, New York County (Manhattan), New York, USA
Plot
Sect. on West Side of Broadway
Memorial ID
6273093 View Source

Politician. Samuel Seabury was an attorney in New York City during the first half of the 20th century. New York Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed him as lead legal counsel on what became known the Seabury Commission or the Hofstadter Committee, which was named for attorney Samuel Harold Hofstadter. Although Hofstadter was chairman of the committee, Seabury was the actual investigator as the appointed legal counsel to the committee. This committee was a joint legislative committee of the New York State Legislature, which was formed to probe in the corruption of New York City, including the police force and elected officials as well as Lucky Luciano and other Organized Crime figures. This action was done as a result of a murder of the state witness Vivian Gordon and the unsolved mystery of the disappearance of Supreme Court Justice, Joseph Force Crater. The mayor of New York City, Jimmy Walker, resigned as a result of the investigation. In December of 1932, Seabury issued his final of numerous reports and the investigations bearing his name came to a close. In 1932, Seabury received "The Hundred Year Association of New York's Gold Medal Award "in recognition of outstanding contributions to the City of New York." Seabury was a descendent of Samuel Seabury, who was the first American Episcopal Bishop. Although his family had limited funds for formal schooling, he attended private schools. He knew he would have to provide for any further education by working his way. After graduating from the New York Law School in 1893 and passing the bar the next year, he entered politics in 1899 by running against the well-established, yet corrupted, Tammany Hall candidate unsuccessfully as an Independent Labor Republican. He was a reform candidate, supporting the Single Tax movement, the idea that all taxation should be on the land. In 1901, he was a candidate for the City Court, this time on the Citizen Union ticket, and was elected to a ten-year term. As part of his work, five City Court clerks were fired for stealing fees that they had collected. In 1905, he was an unsuccessful candidate for the New York Supreme Court, but in 1906, he was successful at age 33. In 1913, he was an unsuccessful candidate for the Court of Appeals, but in 1914, he was elected to this post for a 14-year term. On December 8, 1914, he was appointed to the Court of Appeals three weeks before his elective term would begin, to fill the vacancy caused by a death. In 1916 he resigned this post to be a candidate for Governor at the encouragement of Theodore Roosevelt, but at the last minute, Roosevelt gave his support to another candidate. At this point, he ended his political career and went into private practice as a lawyer. Turning away from his flourishing law practice, he stepped-up in 1930 to serve on the Seabury Commission to allay crime in New York City. At the close of the committee, he was offered by the city a $75,000 compensation but refused the money for his service. He became active in the New York Bar Association, becoming president from 1939 to 1941. In 1950, he published "The New Federalism," expressing doubts about increasing governmental power. He married but the couple had no children. His wife died in 1950, which was a devastated loss. After a decline in his health over several years, he died as a resident of a nursing home. A park in Manhattan was named in his honor. During the active Seabury Commission, his image graced the cover of "Time" weekly magazine. Author Herbert Mitgang published "The Man Who Rode the Tiger: Judge Samuel Seabury" in 1966.

Politician. Samuel Seabury was an attorney in New York City during the first half of the 20th century. New York Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed him as lead legal counsel on what became known the Seabury Commission or the Hofstadter Committee, which was named for attorney Samuel Harold Hofstadter. Although Hofstadter was chairman of the committee, Seabury was the actual investigator as the appointed legal counsel to the committee. This committee was a joint legislative committee of the New York State Legislature, which was formed to probe in the corruption of New York City, including the police force and elected officials as well as Lucky Luciano and other Organized Crime figures. This action was done as a result of a murder of the state witness Vivian Gordon and the unsolved mystery of the disappearance of Supreme Court Justice, Joseph Force Crater. The mayor of New York City, Jimmy Walker, resigned as a result of the investigation. In December of 1932, Seabury issued his final of numerous reports and the investigations bearing his name came to a close. In 1932, Seabury received "The Hundred Year Association of New York's Gold Medal Award "in recognition of outstanding contributions to the City of New York." Seabury was a descendent of Samuel Seabury, who was the first American Episcopal Bishop. Although his family had limited funds for formal schooling, he attended private schools. He knew he would have to provide for any further education by working his way. After graduating from the New York Law School in 1893 and passing the bar the next year, he entered politics in 1899 by running against the well-established, yet corrupted, Tammany Hall candidate unsuccessfully as an Independent Labor Republican. He was a reform candidate, supporting the Single Tax movement, the idea that all taxation should be on the land. In 1901, he was a candidate for the City Court, this time on the Citizen Union ticket, and was elected to a ten-year term. As part of his work, five City Court clerks were fired for stealing fees that they had collected. In 1905, he was an unsuccessful candidate for the New York Supreme Court, but in 1906, he was successful at age 33. In 1913, he was an unsuccessful candidate for the Court of Appeals, but in 1914, he was elected to this post for a 14-year term. On December 8, 1914, he was appointed to the Court of Appeals three weeks before his elective term would begin, to fill the vacancy caused by a death. In 1916 he resigned this post to be a candidate for Governor at the encouragement of Theodore Roosevelt, but at the last minute, Roosevelt gave his support to another candidate. At this point, he ended his political career and went into private practice as a lawyer. Turning away from his flourishing law practice, he stepped-up in 1930 to serve on the Seabury Commission to allay crime in New York City. At the close of the committee, he was offered by the city a $75,000 compensation but refused the money for his service. He became active in the New York Bar Association, becoming president from 1939 to 1941. In 1950, he published "The New Federalism," expressing doubts about increasing governmental power. He married but the couple had no children. His wife died in 1950, which was a devastated loss. After a decline in his health over several years, he died as a resident of a nursing home. A park in Manhattan was named in his honor. During the active Seabury Commission, his image graced the cover of "Time" weekly magazine. Author Herbert Mitgang published "The Man Who Rode the Tiger: Judge Samuel Seabury" in 1966.

Bio by: Linda Davis


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: Bill Heneage
  • Added: 19 Mar 2002
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 6273093
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/6273093/samuel-seabury: accessed ), memorial page for Samuel Seabury (22 Feb 1873–7 May 1958), Find a Grave Memorial ID 6273093, citing Trinity Church Cemetery and Mausoleum, Manhattan, New York County (Manhattan), New York, USA; Maintained by Find a Grave.