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 John George Campbell

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John George Campbell

Birth
Kenosha, Kenosha County, Wisconsin, USA
Death
4 Feb 1924 (aged 80)
Traer, Tama County, Iowa, USA
Burial
Traer, Tama County, Iowa, USA
Memorial ID
62575195 View Source

Son of John and Henrietta Campbell.

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Traer Star Clipper, Friday, February 8, 1924 page 1

Johnny Campbell, everybody’s friend, died Monday last of pneumonia. Two years ago, he suffered a stroke of apoplexy, from which he only partially recovered. He has been feeble since, but able to be on the street most of the time the past year. His demise removes from north Tama one of its most notable characters, who for nearly sixty years has been active, prominent, and popular.

John George Campbell was born in Kenosha, Wisconsin, August 13, 1843. His boyhood and young manhood were spent in Wisconsin and when the Civil war came on, he enlisted in Company B, Thirty-third regiment, Wisconsin infantry, and served three years. He participated in some of the great battles of that war, such as Shiloh, Vicksburg, and Chickamauga, fully proving his valor and winning an honorable discharge. His marriage with Miss Sara Jameyson occurred October 26, 1866. The home was established in south Black Hawk county, Iowa, but later they removed to Traer.

Seven children were born of this union namely: Harriet, who died November 8, 1877; Minnie, Jean, Lois, Mamie, who died December 22, 1910; Sarah and Mabel. Mrs. Campbell died on September 26, 1883, age thirty-seven years. On January 1st, 1888, Mr. Campbell was united in marriage with Mary A. Logan, of the Traer community. Four children were born of this union, namely: John, Jessie, who died at the age of two years; Cedric and Logan. Mrs. Campbell died May 30, 1896.

Mr. Campbell was an active businessman of the community up to very recent years and enjoyed the respect and confidence of the people with whom he did business to a remarkable degree and measure. His high sense of honor and his scrupulous regard for the rights of others won the implicit confidence of the public. He began his business career here by carrying mail on Star routes. In the days of old Buckingham, he made three tris a week to Toledo, Fifteen Mile Grove and LaPorte. In three years, he missed but one trip. Later he made daily trips to Toledo with mail and passengers, until the mail service was fully established on the railroad. He built the first livery stable in Traer and operated it a few years. Later he engaged in the livestock business and continued for nearly fifty years, many years being in partnership with W. H. Gregg. The farmers had implicit confidence in him, and his word was not questioned. He was big hearted and generous beyond his means.

The funeral was on Wednesday afternoon. Dr. Billingsley conducted the service in the Congregational church in the presence of a large audience. The floral offerings were remarkably generous and beautiful. Burial was in Buckingham. Mr. Campbell selected his own pall bearers before his death. They were William Balfour, John McGowan. A. Gravatt, Charles Logan, R. J. Morison, and K. P. Moore

Contributor: George (48419540)

Son of John and Henrietta Campbell.

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Traer Star Clipper, Friday, February 8, 1924 page 1

Johnny Campbell, everybody’s friend, died Monday last of pneumonia. Two years ago, he suffered a stroke of apoplexy, from which he only partially recovered. He has been feeble since, but able to be on the street most of the time the past year. His demise removes from north Tama one of its most notable characters, who for nearly sixty years has been active, prominent, and popular.

John George Campbell was born in Kenosha, Wisconsin, August 13, 1843. His boyhood and young manhood were spent in Wisconsin and when the Civil war came on, he enlisted in Company B, Thirty-third regiment, Wisconsin infantry, and served three years. He participated in some of the great battles of that war, such as Shiloh, Vicksburg, and Chickamauga, fully proving his valor and winning an honorable discharge. His marriage with Miss Sara Jameyson occurred October 26, 1866. The home was established in south Black Hawk county, Iowa, but later they removed to Traer.

Seven children were born of this union namely: Harriet, who died November 8, 1877; Minnie, Jean, Lois, Mamie, who died December 22, 1910; Sarah and Mabel. Mrs. Campbell died on September 26, 1883, age thirty-seven years. On January 1st, 1888, Mr. Campbell was united in marriage with Mary A. Logan, of the Traer community. Four children were born of this union, namely: John, Jessie, who died at the age of two years; Cedric and Logan. Mrs. Campbell died May 30, 1896.

Mr. Campbell was an active businessman of the community up to very recent years and enjoyed the respect and confidence of the people with whom he did business to a remarkable degree and measure. His high sense of honor and his scrupulous regard for the rights of others won the implicit confidence of the public. He began his business career here by carrying mail on Star routes. In the days of old Buckingham, he made three tris a week to Toledo, Fifteen Mile Grove and LaPorte. In three years, he missed but one trip. Later he made daily trips to Toledo with mail and passengers, until the mail service was fully established on the railroad. He built the first livery stable in Traer and operated it a few years. Later he engaged in the livestock business and continued for nearly fifty years, many years being in partnership with W. H. Gregg. The farmers had implicit confidence in him, and his word was not questioned. He was big hearted and generous beyond his means.

The funeral was on Wednesday afternoon. Dr. Billingsley conducted the service in the Congregational church in the presence of a large audience. The floral offerings were remarkably generous and beautiful. Burial was in Buckingham. Mr. Campbell selected his own pall bearers before his death. They were William Balfour, John McGowan. A. Gravatt, Charles Logan, R. J. Morison, and K. P. Moore

Contributor: George (48419540)

Gravesite Details

John has a GAR (Grand Army of the Republic) marker on his gravesite, honoring his service in the Civil War.


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