John Mervyn Addison

John Mervyn Addison

Birth
Chobham, Surrey Heath Borough, Surrey, England
Death 7 Dec 1998 (aged 78)
Bennington, Bennington County, Vermont, USA
Burial Cremated, Ashes given to family or friend
Memorial ID 62415857 · View Source
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Composer. After attending Wellington College in Berkshire, he enrolled in the Royal College of Music. His studies there were interrupted when World War II came. As a tank commander in the 23rd Hussars of the British 30th Corps, he saw combat experience that included the North African campaign, the Normandy invasion and the Arnhem offensive (Operation Market Garden). After the war, he completed his studies at RCM; he stayed on there until 1957 to teach composition and theory, during which time he wrote classical works such as "Three Terpsichorean Studies for Orchestra," "Trumpet Concerto," "Septet for Wind and Harp," and a ballet, "Carte Blanche," for the Sadler Wells ballet company (now the Royal Ballet). In 1949 he became musical director for the motion picture studio run by Roy Boulting (a service acquaintance of his) and his twin brother John. His first original score was for that studio's "Seven Days to Noon," released the following year. In 1956 he began to write music for the live theater, collaborating with dancer/choreographer John Cranko on a revue, "Cranks," which was a success both in London's West End and on Broadway. He also wrote incidental music for John Osborne's plays "The Entertainer" and "Luther," both of whose film versions he would later score. Other film scores of his include "The Cockleshell Heroes," "Reach for the Sky (a biopic of RAF pilot Douglas Bader, who was a double-leg amputee, a hero of the Battle of Britain and also the composer's brother-in-law)," "Carlton-Browne of the F.O.," "I Was Monty's Double," "A Taste of Honey," "The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner," "The Loved One," "A Fine Madness," "Torn Curtain," "Smashing Time," "The Honey Pot," "The Charge of the Light Brigade (1968 version)," "Sleuth," "Swashbuckler," and "The Seven-Per-Cent Solution." His score for 1963's "Tom Jones (based on Henry Fielding's classic novel)" won him an Oscar (one of four the film received, including Best Picture) as well as a Grammy. His score for 1977's "A Bridge Too Far (based on Cornelius Ryan's book about Operation Market Garden)" won him an Anthony Asquith Award for Film Music from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). In 1976, with the British film industry in a slump, he relocated to southern California where work was more plentiful. There he found a new outlet in television, scoring such miniseries as "Centennial (based on James A. Michener's novel)," "Pearl (about Pearl Harbor)," and "The French Atlantic Affair," and such made-for-TV movies as "A Death in Canaan," "Like Normal People," and "Eleanor, First Lady of the World." His theme music for the series "Murder, She Wrote" won him an Emmy. In 1990, he retired to Bennington, Vermont, where he returned to writing music for chamber orchestra and symphony. His "Bassoon Concertina" was first performed by the Halle Orchestra in Manchester, England, the summer before his death. Cause of death: stroke. The records of the Bennington Town Clerk's office indicate that he was cremated.


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  • Created by: Anonymous
  • Added: 1 Dec 2010
  • Find a Grave Memorial 62415857
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for John Mervyn Addison (16 Mar 1920–7 Dec 1998), Find a Grave Memorial no. 62415857, ; Maintained by Anonymous (contributor 46520717) Cremated, Ashes given to family or friend.