Rev Jonathan Odell

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Rev Jonathan Odell

Birth
Newark, Essex County, New Jersey, USA
Death 25 Nov 1818 (aged 81)
Fredericton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada
Burial Fredericton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada
Plot 2
Memorial ID 61652218 · View Source
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DICTIONARY OF CANADIAN BIOGRAPHY ONLINE http://www.biographi.ca/009004-119.01-e.php?&id_nbr=2582&interval=25&&PHPSESSID=o774ev7lrjfr2u6hekqvigft63 for Odell, Jonathan says he was a Church of England clergyman, office holder, and poet. Born Sept 25 1737 in Newark NJ, son of John Odell, a joiner, and Temperance Dickinson; married May 6 1772 Anne De Cou in Burlington NJ, and they had four children; died Nov 25 1818 in Fredericton NB. His ancestor 4 generations earlier was William Odell, who had come to Concord in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, probably in 1635. He graduated in 1754 from the College of New Jersey (Princeton University), and taught in 1755–56 at the grammar school attached to the college. He studied medicine, and served in a medical capacity with the British forces in the West Indies. Then he went to England, where he was employed for more than two years as an assistant at an academy in Kensington (London). Next he was ordained deacon in London in 1766 and priest in 1767. He returned to New Jersey to Burlington, where he took over a church, and in 1774 he became a member of the New Jersey Medical Society. He could converse in French, and when negotiating with Hessians during the Revolutionary War, rebel troops with fixed bayonets hunted him with orders to take him dead or alive, but he was much beloved by the people of Burlington who would not give him up. He narrowly escaped capture while in hiding in a secret chamber of a house. In 1776 he was able to flee to the British lines in New York, but he had to leave his wife and children behind and was not reunited with them until three years later. In 1777 he was appointed the commander-in-chief of the British forces as superintendent of the printing office and of periodical publications in Philadelphia, and he became known for his passionate satire prose and verses, sometimes boisterous drinking-songs, written as a Loyalist against the whigs. After the revolution in 1783, he proposed the establishment of a college in New Brunswick and became the provincial secretary and assistant secretary to the commander of the British forces responsible for the evacuation. One of Odell's first duties after arriving in New Brunswick in November 1784 was to travel over the 90 miles of the frozen Saint John River to St Anne's Point, which they chose as the site of the future capital of the province. In 1785 the governor ordered that immediate steps be taken to establish the new settlement on the site of an old Acadian village which was to be called Fredericstown in honour of one of the sons of George III. This place was to be Odell's home for the rest of his life. He erected a new house and eventually the family owned one of the largest estates in the area. When the New Brunswick academy, established as early as 1785, received its university charter in 1800, Odell was named as one of its governors. He retired in 1812, when he was succeeded by his son, William Franklin Odell (father and son together held the influential office of provincial secretary for a period of 60 years). He had helped to form the early institutions of the province, and had exercised a great influence on political decisions, partly because of his close personal relationship with the province's first governor. During his lifetime the new capital had only 120 houses and was largely unconnected by roads with the outside world, but Odell wrote prose praising the city and the people of it.


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Inscription

This tablet
[placed?] to commemorate the departed worth
of the honorable and Revd Jonathan Odell M.A.
who was born on the 23rd of September A.D. 1737
and died in this place on the 25th of November A.D. 1818.

He was educated for the profession of physician, surgery,
and in the successive stages of life.
He continued to explore the depths of science and to
traverse the fields of literature.
… without neglecting any branch of usefulness,
he undertook a higher task.
In 1767 was ordained and appointed to the spiritual
[guide??] of Burlington, in the then province of New Jersey.
As he headed God, so he honored the King.
[Amid?] the disturbances which led to the independence
of the United States, he espoused the cause of government
with openness, with decision, & with [zealot’s/zealous] warmth.
Hence he was persecuted and proscribed
and, in 1776, driven out from his family and his home,
his occupation and means of subsistence.
His principles and qualifications
[Commanding??] the notice of persons in command at the seat of war
and during its continuance,
faithfully executed many important & confidential [trusts?]
at the close of the rebellion
he took refuge in the mother country.
His sufferings were remembered & his services appreciated
He was called to a seat in His Majesty’s council in this
province (then newly erected)
He was appointed Secretary, Register of the Record
and Clerk of the Council.
The duties then devolving upon him
he unremittingly and faithfully discharged for upward
of thirty years.
Assisting also upon emergency in the church
after the relinquishment of his appointments,
he left on his wonted course to the end.
Religious, loyal, upright, charitable, prompt,
in friendship, persevering in good office.
Now mourned in proportion as he was cherished & respected
by his family, by his friends, by the public, by the poor.


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  • Maintained by: Linda
  • Originally Created by: Dale Safford
  • Added: 15 Nov 2010
  • Find a Grave Memorial 61652218
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Rev Jonathan Odell (25 Sep 1737–25 Nov 1818), Find a Grave Memorial no. 61652218, citing Old Burial Ground, Fredericton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada ; Maintained by Linda (contributor 47353767) .