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Capt Peter Fisher

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Capt Peter Fisher

Birth
Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina, USA
Death
8 Oct 1890 (aged 95)
Mount Pleasant, Henry County, Iowa, USA
Burial
Mount Pleasant, Henry County, Iowa, USA
Plot
12G Row 22
Memorial ID
61432040 View Source

95 years
Capt-War of 1812

Civil War Veteran
Co G 37th Iowa Infantry
---------------------------------
Find A Grave contributor pmfrench ...

Peter Fisher, one of the pioneer settlers of Henry County, Iowa, was born in Rowan County, N. C., Sept. 26, 1795. His parents were Jacob and Barbara (Beam) Fisher, the father being of German descent, and the mother of North Carolina. In 1808 they removed to Butler County, Ohio, settling near the Miami River, clearing away the timber and making for themselves a home in the wilderness. Jacob Fisher subsequently removed to Franklin County, Ind., where he made his home and endured all the trials and privations of early pioneer life, living the first few years on hominy ground in a small hand-mill. Jacob and Barbara Fischer were the parents of eight children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the only surviving one. They were devoted members of the Lutheran Church, always ready to advance the cause of their Master. Mr. Fisher's political views were those of a Democrat, and he did not fail to teach his son the same principles. He was a man greatly opposed to slavery, bringing up his children with the same views of the cruelty and injustice done to the oppressed colored race.

Our subject grew to manhood on the farm and attended the log-cabin school-house, with its puncheon floors, huge fireplace and greased paper windows. He was married to Miss Elizabeth Herberson in Preble County, Ohio, in 1817. She was a native of Kentucky. This union was blessed with six children, three of whom are now living: Henry, of Conway County, Kan.; William, of Oregon, and Joseph, a lumber dealer of Pittsburgh, Pa.

In 1852 the family came to Henry County and located, and in 1857 Mrs. Fisher was called to her final home. Mr. Fisher subsequently married Mrs. Joslyn, widow of Henry Joslyn. She is a native of Franklin County, Mass., her parents, William and Sophia (Hanson) Joslyn, living and dying in that State. Mr. Joslyn was a native of Vermont. He died in 1855.

Peter Fisher is one of the few surviving soldiers of the War of 1812. He fought under Gen. Harrison, serving until peace was declared, and being discharged at Buffalo, N. Y. True to the early teachings received from his father he took up arms against slavery in the war of the Rebellion, enlisting at the age of sixty-seven in what was known as the Greybeard regiment, 37th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and was on guard duty, serving over two years. He was discharged on account of a broken leg and hip, and was mustered out at Rock Island in 1864, since which time he has lived a retired live, residing at Mt. Pleasant. He now receives a pension of $24 per month.

In early life Mr. Fisher learned the trade of a tailor, which he followed for many years. In politics he is one of the old stanch Democrats of the Jackson stripe, and in early life voted for President Jackson. Mr. and Mrs. Fisher are members of the Universalist Church, and are always willing to lend a helping hand for the advancement of a good cause. Sufficient praise can scarcely be bestowed upon this man. Reared in a country then hardly more than a wilderness, having few educational advantages, he has yet risen to such eminence that any State might be proud of such a citizen. He served his country truly, earnestly, faithfully, through two wars, and has endured the hardships and trials of pioneer life. Coming to this county when there were no railroads and few settlements, he has always exerted a great and steady influence for the cause of right and for the good of the community. He is now an old man, his life's work is nearly ended, and he is now patiently waiting the call of his Master, and to hear the blessed words of his Savior, “Well done, thou good and faithful servant, enter into the joys of thy Lord.”

Source: Portrait and Biographical Album of Henry County, Iowa, Acme Publishing Company, Chicago, 1888, pp. 432-3

-----------------------
Find A Grave contributor pmfrench ...

OLDEST UNION SOLDIER.

Captain Peter Fisher, of Mount Pleasant, Claims That Honor.

It has been claimed that David Averhill is the oldest soldier now living of the late war, but a correspondent writes to the State Register as follows: “Allow me to present the claim of Captain Peter Fisher, of Mount Pleasant, Ia., to still higher honor. He was born September 25, 1795, at Saulsbury, Rohan County, N. C., moved to Butler County, O., in 1807, was in the war of 1812, enlisting when eighteen years of age. May 30, 1813, was seriously wounded twice at the famous battle of Lundy’s Lane, was at the battle of Chippewa and other noted ones of that war, was discharged in 1815. Came to Iowa in ----, enlisted September, 1862, in the Thirty-seventh Regiment, Iowa volunteer infantry, was badly wounded in service, and was honorably discharged in July, 1864. A hale old veteran, delights to talk of his early exploits in the early days of Ohio at and near Cincinnati, of the stirring times of the war of 1812 and of the late war from ‘61 to ‘65. We think he is entitled to carry the battle flag at the head of the column.” Until other claimants appear Mr. Fisher seems to have a clear title to the claim of being the “oldest Union soldier.”

Source: 15 Mar 1889 Fairfield Ledger

Captain Peter Fisher, who is a citizen of Mt. Pleasant, was born in 1795, was a soldier in the war of 1812, and was a captain in the Iowa Gray Beard regiment, which did valuable service in the union army. Captain Fisher is not only the oldest surviving soldier of the rebellion but is also the oldest surviving member of the Grand Army of the Republic in the United States, and if well enough will visit Burlington at the meeting of the state encampment.

Source: 20 Mar 1889 Humeston New Era

Last Saturday the G. A. R. post at Mt. Pleasant laid to rest their comrad [sic], Capt. Peter Fisher, who had the distinction of being the oldest soldier in the United States. He was born in North Corolina [sic] in 1795, and when the second war with Great Britian [sic] broke out he enlisted, serving under William Henry Harrison until the close of the war. He located in Mt. Pleasant in 1852, and when the rebellion broke out he enlisted in the graybeard regiment serving two years. In politics he was a democrat, having voted for Andrew Jackson.

Source: 15 Oct 1890 Humeston New Era
------------------------------------

From Military Records
Fisher, Peter.
Residence Mount Pleasant,IA
Age 68
Nativity North Carolina.
Enlisted Sept. 16, 1862.
Mustered Feb. 23, 1863.
Discharged July 6, 1864, Rock Island, Ill.

The 37th Iowa Infantry has a unique place in history. It was the only regiment of its kind ever recruited in the United States. It mustered near Muscatine, Iowa. It was made up of men over the enlistment age which at that time was 45. Some were as old as 80 years. Its nickname was "The Greybeard Regiment". Its purpose was to guard prisons and arsenals in order to free young men for active combat duty. Even though it was not supposed to be under combat conditions, the regiment did see active service. The notorious Confederate troops of Forrest launched a surprise attack on the city of Memphis. The 8th Iowa who had provost duty at Memphis required the help of the Greybeards in repulsing this strong attack. In addition the Greybeards were exposed to combat conditions while guarding supply trains going through enemy territory.(Info from "The Union Army" Vol 4 published in 1908.)
...Find A Grave contributor K L Bonnett

95 years
Capt-War of 1812

Civil War Veteran
Co G 37th Iowa Infantry
---------------------------------
Find A Grave contributor pmfrench ...

Peter Fisher, one of the pioneer settlers of Henry County, Iowa, was born in Rowan County, N. C., Sept. 26, 1795. His parents were Jacob and Barbara (Beam) Fisher, the father being of German descent, and the mother of North Carolina. In 1808 they removed to Butler County, Ohio, settling near the Miami River, clearing away the timber and making for themselves a home in the wilderness. Jacob Fisher subsequently removed to Franklin County, Ind., where he made his home and endured all the trials and privations of early pioneer life, living the first few years on hominy ground in a small hand-mill. Jacob and Barbara Fischer were the parents of eight children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the only surviving one. They were devoted members of the Lutheran Church, always ready to advance the cause of their Master. Mr. Fisher's political views were those of a Democrat, and he did not fail to teach his son the same principles. He was a man greatly opposed to slavery, bringing up his children with the same views of the cruelty and injustice done to the oppressed colored race.

Our subject grew to manhood on the farm and attended the log-cabin school-house, with its puncheon floors, huge fireplace and greased paper windows. He was married to Miss Elizabeth Herberson in Preble County, Ohio, in 1817. She was a native of Kentucky. This union was blessed with six children, three of whom are now living: Henry, of Conway County, Kan.; William, of Oregon, and Joseph, a lumber dealer of Pittsburgh, Pa.

In 1852 the family came to Henry County and located, and in 1857 Mrs. Fisher was called to her final home. Mr. Fisher subsequently married Mrs. Joslyn, widow of Henry Joslyn. She is a native of Franklin County, Mass., her parents, William and Sophia (Hanson) Joslyn, living and dying in that State. Mr. Joslyn was a native of Vermont. He died in 1855.

Peter Fisher is one of the few surviving soldiers of the War of 1812. He fought under Gen. Harrison, serving until peace was declared, and being discharged at Buffalo, N. Y. True to the early teachings received from his father he took up arms against slavery in the war of the Rebellion, enlisting at the age of sixty-seven in what was known as the Greybeard regiment, 37th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and was on guard duty, serving over two years. He was discharged on account of a broken leg and hip, and was mustered out at Rock Island in 1864, since which time he has lived a retired live, residing at Mt. Pleasant. He now receives a pension of $24 per month.

In early life Mr. Fisher learned the trade of a tailor, which he followed for many years. In politics he is one of the old stanch Democrats of the Jackson stripe, and in early life voted for President Jackson. Mr. and Mrs. Fisher are members of the Universalist Church, and are always willing to lend a helping hand for the advancement of a good cause. Sufficient praise can scarcely be bestowed upon this man. Reared in a country then hardly more than a wilderness, having few educational advantages, he has yet risen to such eminence that any State might be proud of such a citizen. He served his country truly, earnestly, faithfully, through two wars, and has endured the hardships and trials of pioneer life. Coming to this county when there were no railroads and few settlements, he has always exerted a great and steady influence for the cause of right and for the good of the community. He is now an old man, his life's work is nearly ended, and he is now patiently waiting the call of his Master, and to hear the blessed words of his Savior, “Well done, thou good and faithful servant, enter into the joys of thy Lord.”

Source: Portrait and Biographical Album of Henry County, Iowa, Acme Publishing Company, Chicago, 1888, pp. 432-3

-----------------------
Find A Grave contributor pmfrench ...

OLDEST UNION SOLDIER.

Captain Peter Fisher, of Mount Pleasant, Claims That Honor.

It has been claimed that David Averhill is the oldest soldier now living of the late war, but a correspondent writes to the State Register as follows: “Allow me to present the claim of Captain Peter Fisher, of Mount Pleasant, Ia., to still higher honor. He was born September 25, 1795, at Saulsbury, Rohan County, N. C., moved to Butler County, O., in 1807, was in the war of 1812, enlisting when eighteen years of age. May 30, 1813, was seriously wounded twice at the famous battle of Lundy’s Lane, was at the battle of Chippewa and other noted ones of that war, was discharged in 1815. Came to Iowa in ----, enlisted September, 1862, in the Thirty-seventh Regiment, Iowa volunteer infantry, was badly wounded in service, and was honorably discharged in July, 1864. A hale old veteran, delights to talk of his early exploits in the early days of Ohio at and near Cincinnati, of the stirring times of the war of 1812 and of the late war from ‘61 to ‘65. We think he is entitled to carry the battle flag at the head of the column.” Until other claimants appear Mr. Fisher seems to have a clear title to the claim of being the “oldest Union soldier.”

Source: 15 Mar 1889 Fairfield Ledger

Captain Peter Fisher, who is a citizen of Mt. Pleasant, was born in 1795, was a soldier in the war of 1812, and was a captain in the Iowa Gray Beard regiment, which did valuable service in the union army. Captain Fisher is not only the oldest surviving soldier of the rebellion but is also the oldest surviving member of the Grand Army of the Republic in the United States, and if well enough will visit Burlington at the meeting of the state encampment.

Source: 20 Mar 1889 Humeston New Era

Last Saturday the G. A. R. post at Mt. Pleasant laid to rest their comrad [sic], Capt. Peter Fisher, who had the distinction of being the oldest soldier in the United States. He was born in North Corolina [sic] in 1795, and when the second war with Great Britian [sic] broke out he enlisted, serving under William Henry Harrison until the close of the war. He located in Mt. Pleasant in 1852, and when the rebellion broke out he enlisted in the graybeard regiment serving two years. In politics he was a democrat, having voted for Andrew Jackson.

Source: 15 Oct 1890 Humeston New Era
------------------------------------

From Military Records
Fisher, Peter.
Residence Mount Pleasant,IA
Age 68
Nativity North Carolina.
Enlisted Sept. 16, 1862.
Mustered Feb. 23, 1863.
Discharged July 6, 1864, Rock Island, Ill.

The 37th Iowa Infantry has a unique place in history. It was the only regiment of its kind ever recruited in the United States. It mustered near Muscatine, Iowa. It was made up of men over the enlistment age which at that time was 45. Some were as old as 80 years. Its nickname was "The Greybeard Regiment". Its purpose was to guard prisons and arsenals in order to free young men for active combat duty. Even though it was not supposed to be under combat conditions, the regiment did see active service. The notorious Confederate troops of Forrest launched a surprise attack on the city of Memphis. The 8th Iowa who had provost duty at Memphis required the help of the Greybeards in repulsing this strong attack. In addition the Greybeards were exposed to combat conditions while guarding supply trains going through enemy territory.(Info from "The Union Army" Vol 4 published in 1908.)
...Find A Grave contributor K L Bonnett


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