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 Manasse Tjiseseta

Manasse Tjiseseta

Birth
Namibia
Death 17 Apr 1898 (aged 47)
Omaruru, Erongo, Namibia
Burial Omaruru, Erongo, Namibia
Plot 27
Memorial ID 61292170 · View Source
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Overhereo Tribe White Flag third in succession to Wilhelm Zeraua

Manasse Tyiseseta was born at Otjimbingwe on 25.04.1850. He was trained at the Augustineum in Otjimbingwe. He left, together with Christian Wilhelm Zeraua, Otjimbingwe in 1867 and moved to Omaruru (Okonjose). Manasse taught at the school in Omaruru from 1871-1882. He was the half-brother of Chief Tjaherani (ca. 1860-1884), and was elected Ovaherero Chief of Omaruru after Tjaherani's death in 1884 (29.11.1876 after the death of Wilhelm Zeraua according to other sources). Initially, he was a Christian and supported the missionaries, but upon becoming Chief (1884-1898), he returned to the traditional religion. He was married to one of Zeraua's daughters, Albertine. On 03.11.1885, a protection treaty was concluded between Manasse and Göring in the presence of missionary Büttner. In spite of this treaty Manasse managed to maintain a polity independent from the Germans and Maharero. This independence was based on sound trade links with the Cape Colony for arms and ammunition as well as a disciplined armed force. In the late 1880s, following the arrival of German colonial forces in central SWA, Manasse Tyiseseta continued to seek political independence. When Samuel Maharero was recognised by the German authorities as supreme Ovaherero leader in August 1891, this was not accepted by other Ovaherero leaders, such as Manasse Tyiseseta of Omaruru, Kandji Tjetjo of Owikokorero and the Ovambanderu leader Kahimemua Nguvauva, as well as Riarua, Maharero's former advisor. On 29.11.1892 two mining engineers of the South West Africa Company (SWAC), Rogers and Copeland, described a meeting with Manasse Tyiseseta from Omaruru: "Manasse and his Raad continually ask if we were involved with the Germans ... and I knew if he got in any way to understand that we were with the Germans, we would go no further. [Manasse expressed:] This is our country! We are owners of it. We do not want war. We are for peace. We have been cheated many times before; but now our eyes are opened, and when once you could buy land with a bottle of whisky or a suit of clothes, that time is all gone by." On 26.11.1894 Leutwein persuaded Samuel Maharero and Zacharias Zeraua of Otjimbingwe to meet Manasse Tyiseseta at Omaruru to seek agreement between the Ovaherero leaders. Leutwein's demonstration of power led to the downfall of Manasse's independent position and to the establishment of a German military garrison at Omaruru. During the rinderpest epidemic of 1897, Erich Victor Carl August Franke reported that Manasse Tyiseseta of Omaruru refused to get his cattle inoculated. He died of typhoid fever on 17.04.1898, and was buried next to Wilhelm Zeraua in the old cemetery in Omaruru.
Taken from Biographies of Namibian Personalities by Dr. Klaus Dierks on line


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  • Created by: Naomi Snider (Yocom) McFadden
  • Added: 8 Nov 2010
  • Find A Grave Memorial 61292170
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Manasse Tjiseseta (25 Apr 1850–17 Apr 1898), Find A Grave Memorial no. 61292170, citing Old Rhenish Cemetery, Omaruru, Erongo, Namibia ; Maintained by Naomi Snider (Yocom) McFadden (contributor 47310768) .