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 Michael Tjiseseta

Michael Tjiseseta

Birth
Namibia
Death 1924 (aged 51–52)
Krugersdorp, West Rand District Municipality, Gauteng, South Africa
Burial Omaruru, Erongo, Namibia
Memorial ID 61292169 · View Source
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Ovaherero Tribe White Flag fourth in succession to Wilhem Zeraua

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
REMAINS OF HERERO HERO RETURN TO NAMIBIA AFTER EIGHTY YEARS
The remains of Michael Tjiseseta, son of Manasse and Albertina Tjiseseta, King of the Herero in Omaruru from the passing of his father until his own passing in exile in Krugersdorp in 1924, will be returned to Omaruru after being interred for eighty years in South Africa in time for the next White Flag Day scheduled for the 1st, 2nd and 3rd of October, 2004, in Omaruru.
The occasion will be called "The Day of the Hero of the Cause" and will be attended by as many Herero as possible, dignitaries from Namibia, members of the government of Namibia, and others who wish to witness this historic event and show respect to this leader.
Michael Tjiseseta was the King of the Herero in Omaruru during the war with the Germans early in the 20th century. In 1905 he decided to leave Tsau, a few kilometers south of Otjiwarongo to go to Botswana with his followers to escape the Germans who were executing all captured Herero, but his advisers told him if he did they were not able to carry enough water and many of his followers would die from these conditions. He finally decided to make the journey traversing German South West Africa from east to west a distance of nearly 400 km, to seek safety in British territory in Walvis Bay. They were able to pick up stragglers as they journeyed.
Even though closely pursued by the Germans, he was successful in this endeavor, but he and his followers were disarmed and interned in Walvis Bay. On 29 January, 1906, Michael, accompanied by 198 Herero and 85 others left Walvis Bay, were shipped to Cape Town and the mines of the Witwatersrand. In return for the supply of mine laborers from amongst his followers Michael was permitted to live on a farm near Johannesburg. Michael was never able to return to Omaruru, but died in exile in Krugersdorp in 1924.
The remains will be disinterred early on the morning of 29 September in Krugersdorp, South Africa, in the presence of at least three members of the Herero Traditional Council, who will return that day by plane accompanied by a South African escort to Windhoek with the remains. They will overnight in Windhoek and on Friday the First of October, the remains and their South African escort will proceed through Okahandja on to Omaruru.
The event will be observed in the following manner. On the 1st of October about 17h00 the remains will be turned over to the Royal House of Zeraua in Ozondje, Omaruru, where a full formal Herero funeral will begin. The members of the family and well wishers and other mourners will come all night to either sit around the fire commemorating the Hero of the Cause, or be inside the house with the women mourning his passing. Early in the morning on the 2nd of October, the remains will be transported to the Herero Commando in Ozondje, where Herero and guests will gather during the entire day, with their cavalry attachment, to pay honor to the Hero of the Cause. Early on the morning of the 3rd of October the remains will be transported from Ozondje downtown to the Herero Cemetery, accompanied by the customary White Flag Day procession of hundreds of men in uniform and women in their traditional White, Red and Green gowns to the place of final interment at the historic Herero Cemetery. Following the interment ceremony there will be speeches at the grave side, and the entire ntourage will retire back to the Herero Commando in Ozondje to continue with all of the traditional White Flag Day speeches and gathering.
Press release Issued by Haynes C. McFadden on behalf of King Christiaan Zeraua
There were a few changes in the procedure. The remains were taken directly to the Commando and laid in state from late Friday afternoon to Sunday morning. The service was in front of the Church and not at the graveside though there were speeches made after the remains were at the grave instead of the Commando. There were about 2000 people present for this event.
On August 16, 2004, at the 100th anniversary of the start of the genocide, a member of the German government, Heidemarie Wieczorek-Zeul, Germany's Minister for Economic Development and Cooperation, officially apologized and expressed grief about the genocide, declaring amidst a speech that:"We Germans accept our historical and moral responsibility and the guilt incurred by Germans at that time."She ruled out paying special compensations, but promised continued economic aid for Namibia which currently amounts to $14m a year.
The von Trotha family travelled to Omaruru in October 2007 by invitation of the royal Herero chiefs and publicly apologized for the actions of their relative. Wolf-Thilo von Trotha said: " We, the von Trotha family, are deeply ashamed of the terrible events that took place 100 years ago. Human rights were grossly abused that time."
Michael Tyiseseta was born at Omaruru. He was the eldest son of Chief Manasse Tyiseseta and his wife Albertine. He succeeded his father upon Manasse's death in 1898. In November 1899 a quarrel broke out between Samuel Maharero and Michael Tyiseseta of Omaruru. Theodor Leutwein intervened and explained that Samuel had no direct authority over Michael's people. On 17.01.1904, he left Omaruru to join the war against the Germans. On 11.03.1904 Leutwein reported that Samuel Maharero was positioned along the line of Otjosazu, Okatumba at the Swakop River and Katjapia (with ±1 000 rifles); that Chief Michael Tyiseseta was moving from the Etjo Mountains in an eastward direction (with ±500 rifles); that the Tjetjo community had retreated from Kehoro at the Black Nossob River in the direction of the Onjati Mountains (with ±1 000 rifles); and that more Ovaherero under the command of Zacharias Zeraua (with ±1 000 rifles) could be found in the area of Otjimbingwe at the Sney River, and at Lievenberg and Oruware at the Swakop River. In July 1904 Samuel Maharero occupied the area of Otjozondjupa and the Hamakari River, while Michael Tyiseseta concentrated his forces at Omuveroume between the Little and Great Waterberg. Michael took part in the Battle of Waterberg in August 1904. After the Waterberg Battle, the Ovaherero assembled at Okahandja North between the Omatako omuramba and the Eiseb omuramba. They fled further via Otjinene, Epata, Osombo-Windimbe (Ozombo ja Windimba) and Erindi-Ombahe, following the course of the Eiseb omuramba. Zacharias Zeraua from Otjimbingwe reported later that the chiefs Samuel Maharero from Okahandja, Banjo from Otjombonde, David and Salatiel Kambazembi from Waterberg, Ouandja from Otjikururume, Kayata from Otjihaenena, Michael Tyiseseta from Omaruru, Katjahingi and Assa Riarua had all assembled at Osombo Onjatu at the Eiseb omuramba. In December 1904 Michael Tyiseseta and nine followers escaped the Germans and Michael handed himself over to the British authorities in Walvis Bay. From there he was brought by the German vessel "Eduard Bohlen" to Cape Town in South Africa from where he was transferred to the Witwatersrand in Transvaal. He became a kind of a foreman on the gold mines of the Reef. He died 1923 (1926 (Prof. Schlosser) or 1927 to other sources) in Krugersdorp (South Africa). His remains are to be transferred with military honours to the independent Republic of Namibia in 2004 to be buried along his forefathers at Omaruru.
Taken from Biographies of Namibian Personalities by Dr. Klaus Dierks on line


Family Members

Siblings
Gravesite Details Was moved from South Africa to Omaruru in 2004

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  • Created by: Naomi Snider (Yocom) McFadden
  • Added: 8 Nov 2010
  • Find A Grave Memorial 61292169
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Michael Tjiseseta (1872–1924), Find A Grave Memorial no. 61292169, citing Old Rhenish Cemetery, Omaruru, Erongo, Namibia ; Maintained by Naomi Snider (Yocom) McFadden (contributor 47310768) .