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Herman Yezak

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Herman Yezak

Birth
Death
22 Nov 1986 (aged 73)
Burial
Bremond, Robertson County, Texas, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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From an article written for the Fort Worth Star Telegram by John McConal. This was republished in his book; John McConal's Texas POLITICIAN ELECTED BY MAIL IN BREMOND Herman Yezak's election as a state representative from this town in northern Robertson County is still unbelievable for 2 reasons. Not only was he not there during the campaign but he spent only a few dollars soliciting votes. That expense came from buying a few postcards to mail to voters in the community, which is southeast of Waco. The reason Yezak did not campaign in person was simple. He was a First Lieutenant in the Army and was fighting in Italy during World War II. So he announced his candidacy and his qualifications by sending out a postcard. He wrote, "Since I am overseas in Italy, I am using this card as one way of soliciting your vote". Then he gave his qualifications. "I am a Robertson County farm boy, thirty-one, single and a Bremond High School and A&M College graduate. I ask that you give my candidacy careful consideration when casting your vote in the Democratic Primary in July, and if you believe and feel that I am the kind of fellow that you are willing to entrust this office to, then give me your vote and it will be sincerely appreciated. "Should I be elected, I will be there to serve after having the occasion to face the enemy several times like other Robertson county service men had and will before the World conflict is over." His widow, Betty relates; "He was fighting in Italy and the war was about over and he was trying to decide what to do. So he decided to run for office. His filing papers got here after the deadline, but the official knew Herman and went ahead and accepted them". She said after her husband won the primary, everyone in his troop became excited about his possibility of being elected. "They tried to take care of him by not sending him out on so many patrols," she said. He was notified by mail after he won in Nov. 1944. He got back to the states in December of that year. Why was he able to defeat an incumbent without campaigning in person? "Well he was from a good family. People knew them and him", Betty said. And being from a small community voters probably knew everything about him like his 1938 graduation from Texas A&M and his working on the family farm all his life. Betty said she met Herman after he was elected. They were married Nov. 1, 1949. "Politics was his passion and he was elected to 9 terms as state representative", she said. Herman was a longtime employee of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture and bought the Bremond newspaper in 1960. Betty took over running the paper after he died
From an article written for the Fort Worth Star Telegram by John McConal. This was republished in his book; John McConal's Texas POLITICIAN ELECTED BY MAIL IN BREMOND Herman Yezak's election as a state representative from this town in northern Robertson County is still unbelievable for 2 reasons. Not only was he not there during the campaign but he spent only a few dollars soliciting votes. That expense came from buying a few postcards to mail to voters in the community, which is southeast of Waco. The reason Yezak did not campaign in person was simple. He was a First Lieutenant in the Army and was fighting in Italy during World War II. So he announced his candidacy and his qualifications by sending out a postcard. He wrote, "Since I am overseas in Italy, I am using this card as one way of soliciting your vote". Then he gave his qualifications. "I am a Robertson County farm boy, thirty-one, single and a Bremond High School and A&M College graduate. I ask that you give my candidacy careful consideration when casting your vote in the Democratic Primary in July, and if you believe and feel that I am the kind of fellow that you are willing to entrust this office to, then give me your vote and it will be sincerely appreciated. "Should I be elected, I will be there to serve after having the occasion to face the enemy several times like other Robertson county service men had and will before the World conflict is over." His widow, Betty relates; "He was fighting in Italy and the war was about over and he was trying to decide what to do. So he decided to run for office. His filing papers got here after the deadline, but the official knew Herman and went ahead and accepted them". She said after her husband won the primary, everyone in his troop became excited about his possibility of being elected. "They tried to take care of him by not sending him out on so many patrols," she said. He was notified by mail after he won in Nov. 1944. He got back to the states in December of that year. Why was he able to defeat an incumbent without campaigning in person? "Well he was from a good family. People knew them and him", Betty said. And being from a small community voters probably knew everything about him like his 1938 graduation from Texas A&M and his working on the family farm all his life. Betty said she met Herman after he was elected. They were married Nov. 1, 1949. "Politics was his passion and he was elected to 9 terms as state representative", she said. Herman was a longtime employee of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture and bought the Bremond newspaper in 1960. Betty took over running the paper after he died

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