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 Albert R. Stone

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Albert R. Stone

Birth
Deerfield, Oneida County, New York, USA
Death
26 Feb 1934 (aged 67)
Rochester, Monroe County, New York, USA
Burial
Rochester, Monroe County, New York, USA
Memorial ID
60089619 View Source

Death Ends Career of Veteran News Photographer

---

Pioneer in Picture Field,
Albert R. Stone Dies at 67

---


Albert R. Stone, Democrat and Chronicle staff photographer, "Stoney" to his legion of friends who reach from Coast to Coast, is dead.

He passed away quietly yesterday noon at his home, 53 Alberta Street where he had been under treatment for a heart ailment for several weeks. He was 67 years old.

The oldest newspaper staff photographer in the point of service in New York State, if not the country, and once proclaimed by the late George Eastman "the peer of all American newspaper photographers," Mr. Stone lived a rich life.

With the recluse of the hayside, with presidents, governors, royalty or American or foreign aristocracy, he was ever the same "Stoney." His ability to grasp the human side of everything won the respect of all with whom he came in contact and made for his success in his field of endeavor.

Funeral services will be conducted Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at Corbett's Funeral Home, 532 Lake Avenue, the Rev. Justin W. Nixon, D. D., minister of Brick Presbyterian Church, officiating. Burial will be in Riverside Cemetery.

Honorary bearers will be Roy C. Kates, Harlan W. Rippey, Harry J. Barsham, Chief Henry T. Copenhagen, Andrew J. Kavanaugh, Harold W. Sanford, Allen C. Ross, George C. Donahue, John A. Doyle, Dr. Guy B. Van Alstyne, Dr. William S. McCann, George S. Brooks, Edwin C. Mason, Joseph Durnherr, William D. Manning, William J. Kirby, Willis Broadhooks and Alber W. Fell.

Active bearers will be Fremont Chester, Cray L. Remington, Henry W. Clune, Joseph T. Adams, Howard H. Kemp and Gerald R. Maloney.

He was born in Deerfield, near Utica, Sept. 2. 1866, the son of Daniel J. and Lucy Biddlecome Stone. He was of English-Yankee descent, his grandfather coming to this country from England whole his grandmother hit the ox-cart trail from Cheshire, Mass., to Deerfield, the journey consuming six weeks.

Farmwork was not to his liking. Neither were the three "Rs" as taught in the rural schools of his day. At 13 years he was struggling with the Second Reader. He tossed this away one day and began to make himself the selfmade man he was.

The village smithy had always held a charm for Stine as a youth and he first elected to try this trade, working at it for three years. The he worked as a stone molder for a short time. From molding he turned to the shoemaking trade.

Was Shoe Worker

But demand for custom made shoes was on the wane and he soon found himself with little work. Rochester at this time had developed into a great shoe manufacturing center and in 1896[?] Mr Stone applied for a position here. His application was accepted and he subsequently worked in several plants.

But fortune was not to permit Albert Stone to remain a shoemaker. Came the panic of the Cleveland administration with its resultant lack of employment. Prior to Rochester he had married Miss Mary Weigand of Utica and when he found himself out of work it was up to him to keep the family larder filled.

Amateur photography was just coming into its own, and "Stoney" purchased a camera. With this under his arm he visited the annual gatherings about the lakeside and city parks and by the sale of the finished photographs he managed to earn a living. It was at one of these outings that he came into contact with the late Harry C. Goodwin, then a reporter on the old Rochester Herald. This meeting marked an epoch in his career as a photographer.

Started on Herald

When the late Louis M. Antisdale, editor of The Herald, decided in 1903 to add a photographer to his news gathering staff, it was Mr. Goodwin who recommended Albert R. Stone for the place and as "Stoney" had previously done some news work for that paper and had been designated as official photographer in the Rochester area by the Utica Saturday Globe he got the job.

As editor and publisher of the Rochester Herald, Mr. Antisdale demanded action in his art work and "Stoney" was the man who could deliver. He delivered in such a manner in fact that no assignments were necessary for him. With a keen nose for news, he invariably turned into the office each day a photographed summary of the day's events.

His work, along with the cartoons of the late John Scott Clubb attracted wide attention. It was not long before the larger metropolitan dailies of the country sought to wean both these men from The Herald, offering what seemed fabulous sums as an inducement. But both Mr. Clubb and Mr. Stone turned a deaf ear to all the enticements thrown their way. To think of leaving their Rochester back yard gardens for life in an apartment was beyond the realms of imagination for either.

Joined Democrat in 1926

As a matter of fact, "Stoney's" only personal view of New York City was caught in the course of his walk from the Pennsylvania to the Grand Central Station on the occasion of the return of the Rochester boys from overseas. He was sent to New York City by The Herald to record the triumphant return.

With the merger of the Rochester Herald and The Democrat and Chronicle in 1926, Mr. Stone became the staff photographer of this paper and has continued int that capacity since.

Outstanding events that were "shot" by Mr. Stone included the wreck of the GAR train at Manchester in 1911; the notorious "Barrel Murder" and K[...] homicides; the Granite Building, Whitney Elevator and East Main, Gibbs Street fires; development of the Port of Rochester; opening of the new University of Rochester and Colgate-Rochester School of Divinity; Glenn Curtiss's first flight at Hammondsport; installation of the Most Rev. Thomas F. Hickey and the Most Rev. John Francis O'Hern as Bishops of the Catholic Diocese of Rochester, and the Most Rev. David Lincoln Ferris as Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Rochester; passing of the old Erie and opening of the Barge Canal; opening of Rochester's subway and the military funeral of Gen. Elwell S. Otis.

Pictured Politicians

No political gathering in the heyday of George W. Aldridge was complete without "Stoney's" presence. One of his favorite subjects at the annual drama under the weeping willows of Newport had "Uncle George" and "Mayor Hi" Edgerton sizing up the situation together.

Mr. Stone carried his love for the great outdoors throughout his life. As an angler or hunter he had no peer and the opening of every trout season saw him up bright and early and on his way to a favorite spot. During his recent illness he was preparing for the coming trout season, passing away his time in bed making flies with which to entice the wily denizen of Western New York streams.

Only a few days prior to his death he received a letter which he cherished greatly from Dr. William S. McCann, physician-in-chief at Strong Memorial Hospital, reminding hims of a date to go trout fishing Apr. 1.

Mr. Stone's first wife died July 28, 1914. In 1921 he married Mrs. Orna Gerks who survives with a son, Daniel J. Stone, of the Democrat and Chronicle news photo staff; two stepsons, Maurice and Edson Gerks of this city and four sisters, Mrs. Mattie MacMillan of Frankfurt, Miss Henrietta Stone and Mrs. Frances Gladwin of Cooperstown and Mrs. William Finlayson of Utica.

The Rochester Democrat and Chronicle
Rochester, New York
Tuesday, 27 February 1934
pages 13, 15


=====================

STONE — Entered into rest, at his home, 53 Alberta Street, Feb. 26, 1934, Albert R. Stone, aged 67 years. He is survived by his wife, Orna M.; three sons, Daniel J. Stone, Maurice and Edson Gerks; 4 sisters, Mrs. Martha MacMillian of Frankfort, N. Y., Miss Henrietta Stone, Mrs. Frances Gladwin of Cooperstown, N. Y., Mrs. William Finlayson of Utica, N. Y.; two grandchildren, Robert and Helen Stone. The body rests at Corbett's Funeral Home, 532 Lake Avenue. Services Thursday afternoon at 2:30. Interment in Riverside Cemetery.

The Rochester Democrat and Chronicle
Rochester, New York
Tuesday, 27 February 1934
page 2?

Death Ends Career of Veteran News Photographer

---

Pioneer in Picture Field,
Albert R. Stone Dies at 67

---


Albert R. Stone, Democrat and Chronicle staff photographer, "Stoney" to his legion of friends who reach from Coast to Coast, is dead.

He passed away quietly yesterday noon at his home, 53 Alberta Street where he had been under treatment for a heart ailment for several weeks. He was 67 years old.

The oldest newspaper staff photographer in the point of service in New York State, if not the country, and once proclaimed by the late George Eastman "the peer of all American newspaper photographers," Mr. Stone lived a rich life.

With the recluse of the hayside, with presidents, governors, royalty or American or foreign aristocracy, he was ever the same "Stoney." His ability to grasp the human side of everything won the respect of all with whom he came in contact and made for his success in his field of endeavor.

Funeral services will be conducted Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at Corbett's Funeral Home, 532 Lake Avenue, the Rev. Justin W. Nixon, D. D., minister of Brick Presbyterian Church, officiating. Burial will be in Riverside Cemetery.

Honorary bearers will be Roy C. Kates, Harlan W. Rippey, Harry J. Barsham, Chief Henry T. Copenhagen, Andrew J. Kavanaugh, Harold W. Sanford, Allen C. Ross, George C. Donahue, John A. Doyle, Dr. Guy B. Van Alstyne, Dr. William S. McCann, George S. Brooks, Edwin C. Mason, Joseph Durnherr, William D. Manning, William J. Kirby, Willis Broadhooks and Alber W. Fell.

Active bearers will be Fremont Chester, Cray L. Remington, Henry W. Clune, Joseph T. Adams, Howard H. Kemp and Gerald R. Maloney.

He was born in Deerfield, near Utica, Sept. 2. 1866, the son of Daniel J. and Lucy Biddlecome Stone. He was of English-Yankee descent, his grandfather coming to this country from England whole his grandmother hit the ox-cart trail from Cheshire, Mass., to Deerfield, the journey consuming six weeks.

Farmwork was not to his liking. Neither were the three "Rs" as taught in the rural schools of his day. At 13 years he was struggling with the Second Reader. He tossed this away one day and began to make himself the selfmade man he was.

The village smithy had always held a charm for Stine as a youth and he first elected to try this trade, working at it for three years. The he worked as a stone molder for a short time. From molding he turned to the shoemaking trade.

Was Shoe Worker

But demand for custom made shoes was on the wane and he soon found himself with little work. Rochester at this time had developed into a great shoe manufacturing center and in 1896[?] Mr Stone applied for a position here. His application was accepted and he subsequently worked in several plants.

But fortune was not to permit Albert Stone to remain a shoemaker. Came the panic of the Cleveland administration with its resultant lack of employment. Prior to Rochester he had married Miss Mary Weigand of Utica and when he found himself out of work it was up to him to keep the family larder filled.

Amateur photography was just coming into its own, and "Stoney" purchased a camera. With this under his arm he visited the annual gatherings about the lakeside and city parks and by the sale of the finished photographs he managed to earn a living. It was at one of these outings that he came into contact with the late Harry C. Goodwin, then a reporter on the old Rochester Herald. This meeting marked an epoch in his career as a photographer.

Started on Herald

When the late Louis M. Antisdale, editor of The Herald, decided in 1903 to add a photographer to his news gathering staff, it was Mr. Goodwin who recommended Albert R. Stone for the place and as "Stoney" had previously done some news work for that paper and had been designated as official photographer in the Rochester area by the Utica Saturday Globe he got the job.

As editor and publisher of the Rochester Herald, Mr. Antisdale demanded action in his art work and "Stoney" was the man who could deliver. He delivered in such a manner in fact that no assignments were necessary for him. With a keen nose for news, he invariably turned into the office each day a photographed summary of the day's events.

His work, along with the cartoons of the late John Scott Clubb attracted wide attention. It was not long before the larger metropolitan dailies of the country sought to wean both these men from The Herald, offering what seemed fabulous sums as an inducement. But both Mr. Clubb and Mr. Stone turned a deaf ear to all the enticements thrown their way. To think of leaving their Rochester back yard gardens for life in an apartment was beyond the realms of imagination for either.

Joined Democrat in 1926

As a matter of fact, "Stoney's" only personal view of New York City was caught in the course of his walk from the Pennsylvania to the Grand Central Station on the occasion of the return of the Rochester boys from overseas. He was sent to New York City by The Herald to record the triumphant return.

With the merger of the Rochester Herald and The Democrat and Chronicle in 1926, Mr. Stone became the staff photographer of this paper and has continued int that capacity since.

Outstanding events that were "shot" by Mr. Stone included the wreck of the GAR train at Manchester in 1911; the notorious "Barrel Murder" and K[...] homicides; the Granite Building, Whitney Elevator and East Main, Gibbs Street fires; development of the Port of Rochester; opening of the new University of Rochester and Colgate-Rochester School of Divinity; Glenn Curtiss's first flight at Hammondsport; installation of the Most Rev. Thomas F. Hickey and the Most Rev. John Francis O'Hern as Bishops of the Catholic Diocese of Rochester, and the Most Rev. David Lincoln Ferris as Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Rochester; passing of the old Erie and opening of the Barge Canal; opening of Rochester's subway and the military funeral of Gen. Elwell S. Otis.

Pictured Politicians

No political gathering in the heyday of George W. Aldridge was complete without "Stoney's" presence. One of his favorite subjects at the annual drama under the weeping willows of Newport had "Uncle George" and "Mayor Hi" Edgerton sizing up the situation together.

Mr. Stone carried his love for the great outdoors throughout his life. As an angler or hunter he had no peer and the opening of every trout season saw him up bright and early and on his way to a favorite spot. During his recent illness he was preparing for the coming trout season, passing away his time in bed making flies with which to entice the wily denizen of Western New York streams.

Only a few days prior to his death he received a letter which he cherished greatly from Dr. William S. McCann, physician-in-chief at Strong Memorial Hospital, reminding hims of a date to go trout fishing Apr. 1.

Mr. Stone's first wife died July 28, 1914. In 1921 he married Mrs. Orna Gerks who survives with a son, Daniel J. Stone, of the Democrat and Chronicle news photo staff; two stepsons, Maurice and Edson Gerks of this city and four sisters, Mrs. Mattie MacMillan of Frankfurt, Miss Henrietta Stone and Mrs. Frances Gladwin of Cooperstown and Mrs. William Finlayson of Utica.

The Rochester Democrat and Chronicle
Rochester, New York
Tuesday, 27 February 1934
pages 13, 15


=====================

STONE — Entered into rest, at his home, 53 Alberta Street, Feb. 26, 1934, Albert R. Stone, aged 67 years. He is survived by his wife, Orna M.; three sons, Daniel J. Stone, Maurice and Edson Gerks; 4 sisters, Mrs. Martha MacMillian of Frankfort, N. Y., Miss Henrietta Stone, Mrs. Frances Gladwin of Cooperstown, N. Y., Mrs. William Finlayson of Utica, N. Y.; two grandchildren, Robert and Helen Stone. The body rests at Corbett's Funeral Home, 532 Lake Avenue. Services Thursday afternoon at 2:30. Interment in Riverside Cemetery.

The Rochester Democrat and Chronicle
Rochester, New York
Tuesday, 27 February 1934
page 2?


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  • Created by: goroke
  • Added: 14 Oct 2010
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 60089619
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/60089619/albert-r-stone: accessed ), memorial page for Albert R. Stone (2 Sep 1866–26 Feb 1934), Find a Grave Memorial ID 60089619, citing Riverside Cemetery, Rochester, Monroe County, New York, USA; Maintained by goroke (contributor 47115147).