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 Jonathan Hunt

Jonathan Hunt

Birth
Greenville, Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, USA
Death 18 Jan 1881 (aged 54)
Gunlock, Washington County, Utah, USA
Burial Gunlock, Washington County, Utah, USA
Memorial ID 59631 · View Source
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Jonathan Hunt 1826-1881
The follow information was abridged from a brief history compiled by Golda Roberts; granddaughter to
Jonathan Hunt and Susan Nanney Hunt and edited by Carl Hunt. Golda used accounts from Parley Hunt and Dorie Hunt as well as several other sources.
Jonathan was the last one of seven children born to his parents John Hunt and Jane Coats. He was born May 20, 1826 at Greenville, Muhlenberg, Kentucky where his brothers and sisters were also born.
Jonathan's first wife was Nancy Davis, who died following the birth of their first child. The son who was named John Watkins Hunt also died. (One record says the name was John Manken.) The child died
May 10, 1863.
Jonathan then married Susan Charlotte Nanney on November 13, l865 at Gus, Muhlenberg, Kentucky.
They lived in the beautiful wooded hills of Central Kentucky, near the present Post Office of Gus, in Muhlenberg County. Here in this vicinity both John and Susan were born and reared, and here they had their first three children, Idella, Parley and Udora.
Jonathan's parents (John Hunt and Jane Coats) had joined the Mormon Church and had moved West to Utah to be with their three Mormon sons who had moved there earlier (Jonathan joined the church before he met Susan. He joined at the time his parents and the rest of the family were baptized.) The one son Enoch and his wife had joined with the Josephites and had moved to Iowa. The three sons who had moved to Utah were Wilson, Amos and Bradford. John Hunt had died shortly after moving West and was buried in Ogden, Utah. Cene a daughter had married a cousin, Jefferson Hunt, and had joined the Church and had gone to the Middle West, but later they returned to remain in Kentucky. This left Jonathan and Susan there in Kentucky. Jonathan worked with the lumber; He had a saw mill that had a platform above it. Here he would saw out lumber for doors and window frames. Most of the houses were made out of logs, Jonathan and Susan's included. Jonathan had a big building with a tall shaft and a wheel on top. Here he ground corn, which was their staple food.
. Jonathan and Susan had lived in Kentucky some time after his family had moved West, and Jonathan had developed consumption (TB) and also had another unidentified serious ailment. Consequently his health was very poor, but he longed to join his folks out West. They had written many times, begging him to sell his property, even if he could only get enough to pay their way West, and they promised to help him as soon as he could manage to move. They wanted him to move to Zion and join the Saints as well as be near them where they could help the family who so desperately needed help, as his condition had worsened and several times Susan had thought he was dying. With him in such a serious condition, Susan's family were very reluctant to see them start on such a long hard journey, with a good chance that he would never make it clear across the continent. They were afraid that he would die and leave her with
three children and another one on the way. But in spite of all the odds, they decided to take the chance.
In July 1873 they made the decision to move to Utah and join his mother and brothers. His father had passed away a short time before in Ogden. He managed to sell his farm and all they owned for three hundred dollars, selling or giving away all they had with the exception of their clothes and a few personal belongings that they could take with them. They did bring with them two feather beds and half a dozen feather pillows that Susan had made before her marriage and which she treasured, as they were truly a luxury. She often mentioned her regrets at having to leave her saddle behind, as she loved to ride Jonathan's Brother Jeff came for them with his team and wagon, and they loaded their things spent the night at his place then continued their journey the next morning traveling down the Green River by
Steamboat to the Ohio River, then up the Ohio to Evansville .Previous to boarding the boat at Rochester, they had bade Jeff good-bye with some misgivings, knowing that they would perhaps never see him again. From Evansville they took the train and stopped off at Council Bluffs, Iowa to visit Aunt Betsy (Medford), Jonathan's sister, also his brother, Enoch. They stayed there for two weeks, then took the train for Ogden, Utah, where the family stayed with Jonathan's brother Wills for a few weeks until they found a house to rent. Jonathan found enough odd jobs to buy them the bare necessities. Their daughter Linda was born that fall, in October and they had rented a little ranch about three miles from Ogden from a Mr. Hall the next spring however they didn't move there immediately but walked back and forth each day to plant and work in the fields. That summer on July 18 1874 Susan and her children Parley,& Idella were baptized in a stream by the ranch. That winter Jonathan's Brother Amos came up to Salt Lake from Hebron with his children, Linda and Amos. They were going to be married there in the Endowment House. After the wedding, they came to Ogden to see Jonathan and Susan. Amos was in quite comfortable circumstances. He had written for Jonathan and Susan to come to Hebron so that he could help them. Jonathan's health was so poor that the family sorely needed some assistance. Following Amos's advice they sold or gave away everything that they couldn't haul in the wagon. Amos's son Jimmy drove four horses and a wagon, up from Southern Utah and bought another wagon. With two teams and two wagons, Jimmy took the family back with him. Jonathan drove one outfit and fed a share of his crop to the team of four horses on the way Jimmy had brought his two sisters, Liza and Linda, with him.
When Linda saw their new baby, she begged Susan to name her Linda, and she would buy her a new dress. Susan wasn't too fond of the name, but the girl coaxed so, that Susan finally gave in, and as a
result baby Linda got a new pink calico dress, or at least the cloth to make one. When they got to Hebron, Amos did help them, but with Jonathan unable to support the family in any way, they needed more help than they received. It was a hard and sad struggle to keep the family fed and clothed. Hebron was near the present town of Enterprise. They lived in Old Hebron for two years. It was while living here that a son
Jonathan Nephi was born on July 11 1877. Amos and John Pulsipher helped the family until Jonathan got a job with Bishop George Crosby, who had a contract maintaining the telegraph line from Parowan, Utah to Pioche, Nevada. His work was to cut and haul cedar posts which were tied with strips of rawhide to long pine poles and set in the ground. The next move was to Gunlock, Utah. Amos helped them
move, and Jonathan was able to buy a piece of land. On their way to Gunlock they were accompanied by a man who had just been released from jail in Pioche. He was on his way to Gunlock to get back the shotgun that had been taken from him when Dudley Leavitt had arrested him. Dudley, with a companion, had tracked the man to a wooded bottom, near the present Indian Reservation, on the Santa Clara Creek and had tricked him into coming out of the brush with his hands up, making him think he was surrounded by a Posse.As the family had traveled from Hebron to Gunlock, everyone had to get out of the wagon near Mountain Meadows, and walk up the hill, which was long and steep, and the horses had all they could do to pull the wagon up the muddy road. Amos got pretty angry at the man from Pioche who held onto the wagon instead of climbing on his own power as the women and children had to do.
Of all of Amos's folks, his son John was most kind to them, and helped them in every way he could. He had a small two roomed home there in Gunlock, but welcomed them into his home with genuine hospitality. They lived right there with them for a time. John had six children and Jonathan and Susan had five at that time, so with the parents there were fifteen people sharing two small rooms, but they were so grateful for John's kindness. John also helped them get their little farm. They owned a team, but feed was so scarce that Jonathan had to hobble them and turn them loose at night up on the hills where they could crop the feed in the little Cove above Gunlock, on their little farm, they raised corn, cane and melons. Susan made molasses and peach preserves in barrels, and the children, as much as they were able,
did all they could to help. They liked living there. There wasn't much excitement there, but the town's folks managed a little entertainment in the form of a dance or party, and they always celebrated on the Fourth of July. On these special days they would have a parade and march through the town. This would be followed by a program with speeches, readings and songs. After each part of the Program, some of the men and boys,(especially the Leavitt boys, Joe, Cy and Weir) would shoot their guns into the air, while the girls would scream and hold their ears. One night the little town actually had two dances going at
the same time. At the upper end of town, Amos's son John, who was a fiddler, gave one dance, and at the lower end of town others were dancing to the toe-tapping music at the home of Bishop Huntsman. The young folks shuttled back and forth afoot between both dances and enjoyed themselves, no end.
In the winter Jonathan went with other townsmen to Leeds, Utah and worked for George Crosby, who now lived there. Bishop Crosby had a wood or lumber contract for the Lubbock Mill, which processed the ore from the Silver Reef mine. Jonathan wasn't a bit well, suffering from the lung sickness that had plagued him for a number of years even before they had left Kentucky. He could cut only one cord of wood a day, for which we was paid $2.00. Sometimes he took his eldest son, Parley with him to help a bit. Parley also worked for a time with his father on the county road. Dore said, "We raised such a lot of melons on our little farm. Mother took the melons and squeezed out the juice, then boiled it down and made five gallons of molasses. We also picked grapes that grew wild on the hills and cooked them into a plum pudding using the melon molasses for a dip. We picked pig weeds for greens and seasoned them with vinegar. My, but they tasted good! "I don't ever remember that we had any money and we never saw sugar. We got pretty bad off for clothes to wear, too, but mother was always able to scare up something for every emergency. She made Linda and I dresses out of flour sacks, but before she got
them dyed, Linda burned hers past wearing when she was playing around a bonfire.
Mother always took us children with her, to glean behind the men as they cradled the wheat. One time when father got to feel a little better, he went to Silver Reef mine to work hauling wood. He wasn't able to do much, and when he came back, he hadn't made as much as mother had made while he was gone. She had gleaned five or six sacks of grain."We often got pretty hard up for food. I remember one winter, that we always spoke of as the `cold winter'. I can just see father coming home on Christmas Eve with icicles frozen in his beard. The lung sickness that father had for so many years finally made him bedfast. He lingered for a long time. We were alone with him in our little cabin, which was about half a mile above town. Finally some of Amos's boys came and stayed to help take care of him and were with us when he died. On Jan 18, 1881, leaving Susan with six children to care for and raise.

NOTE: While Jonathan was buried in Gunlock Cemetery there is no headstone and no record of the exact internment location


wife's:
Susan Charlotte Naney Hunt
Nancy Jane Davis
Charity Morrison


Family Members

Parents
Siblings

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  • Maintained by: Ecclesiastes 3:1-8
  • Originally Created by: Utah State Historical Society
  • Added: 2 Feb 2000
  • Find A Grave Memorial 59631
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Jonathan Hunt (20 May 1826–18 Jan 1881), Find A Grave Memorial no. 59631, citing Gunlock Cemetery, Gunlock, Washington County, Utah, USA ; Maintained by Ecclesiastes 3:1-8 (contributor 47299887) .