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Henrietta McBrayer <I>Buckler</I> Seiberling

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Henrietta McBrayer Buckler Seiberling

Birth
Lawrenceburg, Anderson County, Kentucky, USA
Death
5 Dec 1979 (aged 91)
New York, New York County, New York, USA
Burial
Lawrenceburg, Anderson County, Kentucky, USA Add to Map
Plot
Section 2, Lot #26, Grave #3
Memorial ID
View Source
Henrietta was a member of a Christian fellowship group named the Oxford Group. She and others of the Oxford movement co-founded Alcoholics Anonymous. Born in Lawrenceburg, Kentucky to Judge Julius A. and Mary Maddox Buckler, she spent her childhood in El Paso and San Antonio, TX. A gifted pianist, she attended Vassar College earning an A.B. degree with a major in music and a minor in psychology. She met John Fredrick "Fred" Seiberling, Sr., - a lieutenant in the Ohio National Guard, while he was deployed to El Paso. The couple married in 1917 in Akron, OH, and had 3 children.
Though she was not an alcoholic, she believed as a Christian it was her responsibility to solve social problems. Seiberling began the "alcoholic squad" of the Oxford Group movement. In their first case, Dr. Bob Smith admitted he was a secret drinker, marking the first time the Akron Group prayed together to help someone through alcoholism. Although the majority of the Seiberling family were members of a nearby Lutheran church, she was not. Seiberling was more of a "student of the bible," rather than a "church-goer." She introduced official AA co-founders "Dr. Bob" and "Bill W" to each other at her home in the Gate House on the grounds of the Seiberling family's Stan Hywet Hall mansion in Akron, OH on Mother's Day - May 12, 1935.
The Oxford Group came along when Henrietta's marriage to Fredrick Seiberling was crumbling. Her daughter Dorothy said "It gave her a new focus, and helped her see that there was more to life than marital problems." Henrietta grew closer to Bob and Anne Smith, and would call Anne everyday to talk about the comfort they both received through the Group. The Oxford Group's beliefs inspired some early practices of Alcoholics Anonymous. Henrietta and her husband were devoted supporters of Alcoholics Anonymous, opening their home to its members and also leading meetings of interested Oxford Group members.
Her son, John F. Seiberling, Jr. was a U.S. Congressman (D-OH). She also had 2 daughters - Mary S. Huhn and Dorothy Seiberling Steinberg, who was a deputy editor of the New York Times Magazine.
Seiberling died in New York City. She is buried next to her parents in Lawrenceburg, KY. On her gravestone is an inscription familiar to both the Oxford Group and to Alcoholics Anonymous: "Let Go and Let God." She was inducted posthumously into the Ohio Women's Hall of Fame in 1998.
Henrietta was a member of a Christian fellowship group named the Oxford Group. She and others of the Oxford movement co-founded Alcoholics Anonymous. Born in Lawrenceburg, Kentucky to Judge Julius A. and Mary Maddox Buckler, she spent her childhood in El Paso and San Antonio, TX. A gifted pianist, she attended Vassar College earning an A.B. degree with a major in music and a minor in psychology. She met John Fredrick "Fred" Seiberling, Sr., - a lieutenant in the Ohio National Guard, while he was deployed to El Paso. The couple married in 1917 in Akron, OH, and had 3 children.
Though she was not an alcoholic, she believed as a Christian it was her responsibility to solve social problems. Seiberling began the "alcoholic squad" of the Oxford Group movement. In their first case, Dr. Bob Smith admitted he was a secret drinker, marking the first time the Akron Group prayed together to help someone through alcoholism. Although the majority of the Seiberling family were members of a nearby Lutheran church, she was not. Seiberling was more of a "student of the bible," rather than a "church-goer." She introduced official AA co-founders "Dr. Bob" and "Bill W" to each other at her home in the Gate House on the grounds of the Seiberling family's Stan Hywet Hall mansion in Akron, OH on Mother's Day - May 12, 1935.
The Oxford Group came along when Henrietta's marriage to Fredrick Seiberling was crumbling. Her daughter Dorothy said "It gave her a new focus, and helped her see that there was more to life than marital problems." Henrietta grew closer to Bob and Anne Smith, and would call Anne everyday to talk about the comfort they both received through the Group. The Oxford Group's beliefs inspired some early practices of Alcoholics Anonymous. Henrietta and her husband were devoted supporters of Alcoholics Anonymous, opening their home to its members and also leading meetings of interested Oxford Group members.
Her son, John F. Seiberling, Jr. was a U.S. Congressman (D-OH). She also had 2 daughters - Mary S. Huhn and Dorothy Seiberling Steinberg, who was a deputy editor of the New York Times Magazine.
Seiberling died in New York City. She is buried next to her parents in Lawrenceburg, KY. On her gravestone is an inscription familiar to both the Oxford Group and to Alcoholics Anonymous: "Let Go and Let God." She was inducted posthumously into the Ohio Women's Hall of Fame in 1998.

Inscription

"Let Go And Let God"



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