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 John Robert Whitlock

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John Robert Whitlock

Birth
Saratoga County, New York, USA
Death
11 Oct 1888 (aged 60)
Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York, USA
Burial
Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York, USA
Plot
Sect 4 lot 94
Memorial ID
58902312 View Source

This stone is on the Smithsonian Institute List for Preservation of Cultural Property.

He founded the Whitlock dry goods store which became the L.A. Witherill store at Salina and Fayette streets.

A sudden end to the life of the senior dry goods merchant of the city

The death of John Robert Whitlock occurred at 5 o'clock yesterday morning at the family residence, No. 164 South Salina street, as the result of an attack of rheumatism which reached his heart. Mr. Whitlock was forced by the pain he suffered to leave his business about a week ago, but Dr. Plant, who attended him, had no fears for the outcome, because the attack was far removed from the vital organs. The end came with scarcely a moment's warning.
John Robert Whitlock was born in Saratoga county February 11, 1838, and spent the early years of his life as a farmer. Accompanied by his brother Joel Whitlock, John Ireland and Ambrose L. Smith, the two latter surviving him as residents of the city, he came to Syracuse about 1848, making the journey by packet on the Erie Canal. Joel Whitlock opened a dry goods store in the block which is now the Globe Hotel. The deceased and Mr. Ireland were made clerks. The business was quite successful and at the death of the proprietor in 1853 the deceased purchased the stock of the (unreadable) and took charge of the store. Subsequently it was removed to Hanover square and later back to the old block. At this time John Ireland became a partner and shared the profits for two years. About 1870 Mr. Whitlock established himself in the present location of the store, in the Pike block, at the corner of South Salina and West Fayette streets. By virtue of continued identification in the dry goods trade, Mr. Whitlock was the senior merchant of the city. He was conservative in methods, making few innovations in his manner of doing business, and proceeding without reference to what his competitors in the same line were doing. As a consequence very little city custom came to him, but with the farmers he dealt without interruption and to profitable ends which credit him with accumulating a handsome fortune. His reputation as a merchant was unblemished. Notwithstanding his conservatism and exclusiveness in business, he was outside a citizen of public spirit and an active participant in the discussion of general improvements. The Democratic party, of which he was a life-long member, elected him in 1873 and 1874 to the Common Council for the Sixth ward. In 1877 he was defeated for the mayoralty by James J. Belden. He served one year as Police Commissioner in 1881.
Mr. Whitlock leaves a widow, who was Mary A. Root, daughter of A. Root, an old merchant of Syracuse, a son, Arthur P. Whitlock and a daughter Mrs. Thomas Hogan.

Syracuse Daily Standard, Friday October 12, 1888, page 6

This stone is on the Smithsonian Institute List for Preservation of Cultural Property.

He founded the Whitlock dry goods store which became the L.A. Witherill store at Salina and Fayette streets.

A sudden end to the life of the senior dry goods merchant of the city

The death of John Robert Whitlock occurred at 5 o'clock yesterday morning at the family residence, No. 164 South Salina street, as the result of an attack of rheumatism which reached his heart. Mr. Whitlock was forced by the pain he suffered to leave his business about a week ago, but Dr. Plant, who attended him, had no fears for the outcome, because the attack was far removed from the vital organs. The end came with scarcely a moment's warning.
John Robert Whitlock was born in Saratoga county February 11, 1838, and spent the early years of his life as a farmer. Accompanied by his brother Joel Whitlock, John Ireland and Ambrose L. Smith, the two latter surviving him as residents of the city, he came to Syracuse about 1848, making the journey by packet on the Erie Canal. Joel Whitlock opened a dry goods store in the block which is now the Globe Hotel. The deceased and Mr. Ireland were made clerks. The business was quite successful and at the death of the proprietor in 1853 the deceased purchased the stock of the (unreadable) and took charge of the store. Subsequently it was removed to Hanover square and later back to the old block. At this time John Ireland became a partner and shared the profits for two years. About 1870 Mr. Whitlock established himself in the present location of the store, in the Pike block, at the corner of South Salina and West Fayette streets. By virtue of continued identification in the dry goods trade, Mr. Whitlock was the senior merchant of the city. He was conservative in methods, making few innovations in his manner of doing business, and proceeding without reference to what his competitors in the same line were doing. As a consequence very little city custom came to him, but with the farmers he dealt without interruption and to profitable ends which credit him with accumulating a handsome fortune. His reputation as a merchant was unblemished. Notwithstanding his conservatism and exclusiveness in business, he was outside a citizen of public spirit and an active participant in the discussion of general improvements. The Democratic party, of which he was a life-long member, elected him in 1873 and 1874 to the Common Council for the Sixth ward. In 1877 he was defeated for the mayoralty by James J. Belden. He served one year as Police Commissioner in 1881.
Mr. Whitlock leaves a widow, who was Mary A. Root, daughter of A. Root, an old merchant of Syracuse, a son, Arthur P. Whitlock and a daughter Mrs. Thomas Hogan.

Syracuse Daily Standard, Friday October 12, 1888, page 6


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