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 Joseph Homan Manley

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Joseph Homan Manley

Birth
Bangor, Penobscot County, Maine, USA
Death
7 Feb 1905 (aged 62)
Augusta, Kennebec County, Maine, USA
Burial
Augusta, Kennebec County, Maine, USA
Plot
1-63W
Memorial ID
58328047 View Source

Joseph was a son of James Sullivan Manley & Caroline Gill Sewall.

He was married on 4 Oct 1866 at Augusta, Kennebec County, Maine to Susan Hannah Cony.


American Republican Party official and chairman of the party's National Executive Committee, 1894–96. Manley first attended school in Farmington, Maine at the Abbott Family School for boys, known as the Little Blue School. He began studying law at age 19 in Boston and graduated from Albany Law School in 1863. In 1865, Manley was appointed a commissioner of the United States District Court of Maine, and was a member of the Augusta City Council in 1865-1866, becoming Council president in 1866. In this role he first became associated with Republican politician and future presidential candidate James G. Blaine. From 1869 to 1876, he was an agent of the Internal Revenue Service, posted around the northeast, and in 1876-78 represented the Pennsylvania Railroad in its tax dealings with the Federal government. Manley then returned to Maine and purchased a half-interest in the newspaper The Maine Farmer, once edited by his father. He made it into a major advocate for Blaine-style Republicanism. In 1881, Blaine subsequently secured Manley's appointment as Augusta, Maine's U.S. postmaster, a position he held for seven years. The large Richardsonian Romanesque U.S. Post Office Building in Augusta is one of his legacies. He also instituted free mail delivery service. Manley became Blaine's right-hand man on the Maine Republican State Committee, on which he served for sixteen years, he chaired it for 15 of those years. Manley was the Maine delegate on National Republican Committee (NRC), 1887–1900, and often served on the Republican National Executive Committee. In 1894, he assumed chairman ship of this Executive Committee Chairmanship. This set the stage for Manley to personally manage the 1896 presidential candidacy of Thomas Brackett Reed, who was defeated for the Republican nomination by William McKinley. McKinley's victory in the convention gave Mark Hanna control of the NRC, though Manley stayed on to run the party's New York headquarters, serving as Secretary of the National Committee and chairing various sub-committees until 1900. Manley also held a variety of state offices, serving in the Maine House of Representatives, 1899–1901, and as its Speaker in 1901, and the Maine State Senate, 1903–04). In addition he was a director, board member, trustee and benefactor of many businesses and public services, and was a strong advocate of education for women and secondary education for all students. In 1866, Manley married Susan H. Cony (March 5, 1839 – February 17, 1896), the eldest daughter of former Maine governor Samuel Cony and his first wife, Mary H. Sewall. Mr. and Mrs. Manley had four children: Samuel Cony Manley, Lucy Cony Manley, Harriet Manley, and Sydney Sewall Manley. His son Samuel also became a Republican politico in New York City.
[submitted on 6 June 2016 by THR]

Joseph was a son of James Sullivan Manley & Caroline Gill Sewall.

He was married on 4 Oct 1866 at Augusta, Kennebec County, Maine to Susan Hannah Cony.


American Republican Party official and chairman of the party's National Executive Committee, 1894–96. Manley first attended school in Farmington, Maine at the Abbott Family School for boys, known as the Little Blue School. He began studying law at age 19 in Boston and graduated from Albany Law School in 1863. In 1865, Manley was appointed a commissioner of the United States District Court of Maine, and was a member of the Augusta City Council in 1865-1866, becoming Council president in 1866. In this role he first became associated with Republican politician and future presidential candidate James G. Blaine. From 1869 to 1876, he was an agent of the Internal Revenue Service, posted around the northeast, and in 1876-78 represented the Pennsylvania Railroad in its tax dealings with the Federal government. Manley then returned to Maine and purchased a half-interest in the newspaper The Maine Farmer, once edited by his father. He made it into a major advocate for Blaine-style Republicanism. In 1881, Blaine subsequently secured Manley's appointment as Augusta, Maine's U.S. postmaster, a position he held for seven years. The large Richardsonian Romanesque U.S. Post Office Building in Augusta is one of his legacies. He also instituted free mail delivery service. Manley became Blaine's right-hand man on the Maine Republican State Committee, on which he served for sixteen years, he chaired it for 15 of those years. Manley was the Maine delegate on National Republican Committee (NRC), 1887–1900, and often served on the Republican National Executive Committee. In 1894, he assumed chairman ship of this Executive Committee Chairmanship. This set the stage for Manley to personally manage the 1896 presidential candidacy of Thomas Brackett Reed, who was defeated for the Republican nomination by William McKinley. McKinley's victory in the convention gave Mark Hanna control of the NRC, though Manley stayed on to run the party's New York headquarters, serving as Secretary of the National Committee and chairing various sub-committees until 1900. Manley also held a variety of state offices, serving in the Maine House of Representatives, 1899–1901, and as its Speaker in 1901, and the Maine State Senate, 1903–04). In addition he was a director, board member, trustee and benefactor of many businesses and public services, and was a strong advocate of education for women and secondary education for all students. In 1866, Manley married Susan H. Cony (March 5, 1839 – February 17, 1896), the eldest daughter of former Maine governor Samuel Cony and his first wife, Mary H. Sewall. Mr. and Mrs. Manley had four children: Samuel Cony Manley, Lucy Cony Manley, Harriet Manley, and Sydney Sewall Manley. His son Samuel also became a Republican politico in New York City.
[submitted on 6 June 2016 by THR]


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