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LTC Carl Parker Gies

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LTC Carl Parker Gies

Birth
Goldfield, Esmeralda County, Nevada, USA
Death 2 Jul 1964 (aged 49)
Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon, USA
Burial West Salem, Polk County, Oregon, USA
Plot Lot #32, Space 1
Memorial ID 57988352 View Source
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Sons of Oregon State With U.S. Forces Serving Here and "Over There" in "Oregon Stater" OAC-Alumni Assn., April 1942, Vol. 2, No. 7, pg. 5, col. 3 (with photograph of Carl P. Gies)
THE DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS awarded December 20 to Lieutenant Carl Parker Gies, '41, recognizes his heroic action with the United State air corps in the Philippines. The complete citation follows:
"Lieutenant Gies, on December 10, was gaining altitude for patrol over another field, accompanied by one other pilot, when he received a radio report that his own field was being strafed.
"Although he realized he was greatly outnumbered and with complete disregard for the great personal risk involved, this pilot (Gies) dove through the overcast into the midst of more than 20 hostile craft and downed one enemy plane.
"Upon rejoining his companion airplane, they were immediately attacked by three enemy fighters. Gies' furious attack sent one raider crashing and dispersed the two remaining enemy airplanes. His skill and determination further enabled Gies to fly his badly damaged plane back."
Gies enlisted in the Air Corps in July of 1940, graduated from the advanced training school at Stockton Field, Calif., and was commissioned a second lieutenant March 14, 1941. After a short furlough at home and a few weeks at Stockton Field, he was sent to the Philippines, arriving at Nichols Field, Manila, last May, and later was transferred to Clark Field north of Manila. He mailed his last letter home ten days prior to the outbreak of the war. A cablegram his parents received January 14 advised them "Am Okay. Don't worry."
Later – A letter from C. A. Gies, his father, tells the editor of the arrival late in March of both a radiogram and a letter from his son. Mailed from "Somewhere in Australia," it says that he had gone through a lifetime of adventure and harrowing experiences. Somewhere in the fracus he lost all his personal possessions, but came through without a scratch and in the best of health and spirits.
A recent issue of LIFE magazine contained a picture and account of Gies' action in combat.


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Lt Col 70 Fighter Wing AAF
World War II


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