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1LT Jack Lummus

1LT Jack Lummus

Birth
Ennis, Ellis County, Texas, USA
Death 8 Mar 1945 (aged 29)
Iwo Jima, Tokyo Metropolis, Japan
Burial Ennis, Ellis County, Texas, USA
Plot Old Section, Block 24, Lot 44
Memorial ID 5796720 · View Source
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World War II Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient. His citation reads "For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as leader of a Rifle Platoon attached to the 2d Battalion, 27th Marines, 5th Marine Division, in action against enemy Japanese forces on Iwo Jima in the Volcano Islands, 8 March 1945. Resuming his assault tactics with bold decision after fighting without respite for 2 days and nights, 1st Lt. Lummus slowly advanced his platoon against an enemy deeply entrenched in a network of mutually supporting positions. Suddently halted by a terrific concentration of hostile fire, he unhesitatingly moved forward of his front lines in an effort to neutralize the Japanese position. Although knocked to the ground when an enemy grenade exploded close by, he immediately recovered himself and, again moving forward despite the intensified barrage, quickly located, attacked, and destroyed the occupied emplacement. Instantly taken under fire by the garrison of a supporting pillbox and further assailed by the slashing fury of hostile rifle fire, he fell under the impact of a second enemy grenade but, courageously disregarding painful shoulder wounds, staunchly continued his heroic 1-man assault and charged the second pillbox, annihilating all the occupants. Subsequently returning to his platoon position,k he fearlessly traversed his lines under fire, encouraging his men to advance and directing the supporting tanks against other stubbornly holding Japanese emplacements. Held up again by a devastating barrage, he again moved into the open, rushed a third heavily fortified installatin, and killed the defending troops. Determined to crush all resistance, he led his men indomitably, personally attacking foxholes and spider traps with his carbine and systematically reducing the fanatic opposition until, stepping on a land mine, he sustained fatal wounds. By his oustanding valor, skilled tactics, and tenacious perseverance in the face of overwhelming odds, 1st Lt. Lummus had inspired his stouthearted marines to continue the relentless drive northward, thereby contributing materially to the success of his regimental mission. His dauntless leadership and unwavering devotion to duty throughout sustain and enhance the highest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country." Lummus also played for the New York (football) Giants. He allegedly told the field doctors treating his fatal wounds, "It looks like the Giants have lost a damn good end."

Bio by: Joel Manuel


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  • Maintained by: Find A Grave
  • Originally Created by: Joel Manuel
  • Added: 24 Sep 2001
  • Find A Grave Memorial 5796720
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for 1LT Jack Lummus (22 Oct 1915–8 Mar 1945), Find A Grave Memorial no. 5796720, citing Myrtle Cemetery, Ennis, Ellis County, Texas, USA ; Maintained by Find A Grave .