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LT Francis Lyell “Frank” Hoge

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LT Francis Lyell “Frank” Hoge Veteran

Birth
Virginia, USA
Death
16 Mar 1901 (aged 60)
Wheeling, Ohio County, West Virginia, USA
Burial
Wheeling, Ohio County, West Virginia, USA Add to Map
Plot
Section G, Lots 41-60
Memorial ID
View Source
Aged 60 years, 2 months, 11 days

Son of Isaac and Rachel M. Hoge

Francis Lyell Hoge served in Civil War, Virginia, Enlisted 25 Jun 1861, Rank at enlistment - Midshipman. Promoted to Full Act Master on 24 Sep 1861. Commissioned an officer in the Confederate States Navy on 25 Jun 1861. Promoted to Full Lieutenant on 08 Feb 1862. Promoted to Full 1st Lieutenant on 23 Aug 1863. Commissioned an officer in the Confederate States Prov Navy on 02 Jun 1864.

"Comrade Frank Hoge, of the Shriver Gray Camp, died suddenly of heart disease at Wheeling on March 16, 1901, and was laid to rest two days later by many friends who mourn his loss, among whom are the faithful members of the Shriver Gray Camp 907." Source "Confederate Veteran", 1901, p.372

Additional info from wvgw.net

From: Confederate Military History Extended Edition. Edited by Gen.
Clement A. Evans of Georgia. Wilmington, NC. Broadfoot Publishing
Company, 1987; pages 216-218.

ADDITIONAL SKETCHES ILLUSTRATING THE SERVICES OF OFFICERS AND
PRIVATES AND PATRIOTIC CITIZENS OF WESTERN VIRGINIA.

*LIEUTENANT FRANCIS L. HOGE*

Lieutenant Francis L. Hoge, of Wheeling, W. Va., distinguished in
the naval service of the Confederate States, was born in Marshall
county, Va., in 1841. Destined in youth for a naval career, he was
educated at the Annapolis academy, and graduated with appointment
as midshipman in the United States navy in 1860. His first service
was on a cruise in the Mediterranean, on board the sloop-of-war
Susquehanna, returning from which he resigned his commission in
order to offer his services to his native State. He resigned June
4th, and on June 24th entered the navy of the Confederate States,
being assigned to the Patrick Henry as a midshipman. Later he was
promoted master, and in February, 1862, was commissioned second
lieutenant. He served on the lower James river until March, 1862,
when he participated in the naval battle on Hampton Roads,
commanding the after division of the Patrick Henry in that combat.
Subsequently, when Norfolk was being evacuated he ran the blockade
carrying stores. At Drewry's bluff, when the Federal fleet
attempted to ascend the river, the Patrick Henry was dismantled
and the guns mounted on the bluff, when in the action of May 15,
1862, he served with distinction in command of the naval gun
that was nearest the enemy. He remained at Drewry's bluff for some
time, and in August, 1863, was detailed to select men for the daring
expedition against the Federal gunboats Satellite and Reliance at the
mouth of the Rappahannock river. Under Col. John Taylor Wood he was
second in command, having charge of two of the four small boats which
constituted the attacking squadron. He led the attack upon the
Reliance and was the first on board, and fighting his way forward
with great gallantry, was struck in the neck by a pistol ball, and
fell upon the deck. The expedition was successful, but the dangerous
wound which Lieutenant Hoge had received disabled him until October,
1863. Before leaving Drewry's bluff he served upon the naval
examining board, and immediately after being detached from that
station he acted for six or eight months as second lieutenant of the
ironclad Richmond, under Captain Pegram. His next duty was the
torpedo service on the Chowan and Roanoke rivers, and while in this
field he participated in another famous expedition under Colonel
Wood, the capture of the large Federal gunboat Underwriter, which had
taken a conspicuous part in the operations along the North Carolina
coast. The attack was made in rowboats, on the Neuse river, under the
guns of Fort Stevens, and subject to a direct and heavy fire from the
enemy before the boats could grapple. Lieutenant Hoge was one of the
first on board, and took an efficient part in the successful action,
which was recognized by the Confederate Congress in a joint
resolution of thanks. It was the intention of the Confederate party
to get the vessel off, and to this end Lieutenant Hoge's duty was to
open the magazine and man the guns. Upon doing this, he reported
ready for action to Colonel Wood, but when the cable of the
Underwriter was slipped (a duty assigned to Lieut. W. A. Kerr, of
North Carolina, who was slightly wounded), her bow swung ashore,
consequently the vessel was abandoned. But as they were leaving.
Captain Wood, thinking she was not on fire, sent Hoge back to make
sure of her destruction. He and the cockswain of his boat were the
only ones who went aboard, each with a canteen of camphene. The ship
was ablaze before they had got twenty boats' lengths away. Soon after
this exploit, in February, 1864, Lieutenant Hoge was assigned to the
Confederate ironclad Neuse, at Kinston, N. C., as executive officer,
and he served in this capacity until the evacuation of Kinston, in
March, 1865. On May 11, 1865, he was paroled at Macon, Ga., and he
then made his home at Halifax, Nova Scotia, during a period of five
years. Returning to Virginia in 1870, he came to Wheeling, which has
been his home since that date. In 1881 he was elected city engineer,
an office he held continuously until 1895, except during the year
1883, when he served by appointment of Governor Matthews as a member
of the commission to settle the boundary between Pennsylvania and
West Virginia. He is widely known as an accomplished civil engineer.


(Linda Fluharty
Aged 60 years, 2 months, 11 days

Son of Isaac and Rachel M. Hoge

Francis Lyell Hoge served in Civil War, Virginia, Enlisted 25 Jun 1861, Rank at enlistment - Midshipman. Promoted to Full Act Master on 24 Sep 1861. Commissioned an officer in the Confederate States Navy on 25 Jun 1861. Promoted to Full Lieutenant on 08 Feb 1862. Promoted to Full 1st Lieutenant on 23 Aug 1863. Commissioned an officer in the Confederate States Prov Navy on 02 Jun 1864.

"Comrade Frank Hoge, of the Shriver Gray Camp, died suddenly of heart disease at Wheeling on March 16, 1901, and was laid to rest two days later by many friends who mourn his loss, among whom are the faithful members of the Shriver Gray Camp 907." Source "Confederate Veteran", 1901, p.372

Additional info from wvgw.net

From: Confederate Military History Extended Edition. Edited by Gen.
Clement A. Evans of Georgia. Wilmington, NC. Broadfoot Publishing
Company, 1987; pages 216-218.

ADDITIONAL SKETCHES ILLUSTRATING THE SERVICES OF OFFICERS AND
PRIVATES AND PATRIOTIC CITIZENS OF WESTERN VIRGINIA.

*LIEUTENANT FRANCIS L. HOGE*

Lieutenant Francis L. Hoge, of Wheeling, W. Va., distinguished in
the naval service of the Confederate States, was born in Marshall
county, Va., in 1841. Destined in youth for a naval career, he was
educated at the Annapolis academy, and graduated with appointment
as midshipman in the United States navy in 1860. His first service
was on a cruise in the Mediterranean, on board the sloop-of-war
Susquehanna, returning from which he resigned his commission in
order to offer his services to his native State. He resigned June
4th, and on June 24th entered the navy of the Confederate States,
being assigned to the Patrick Henry as a midshipman. Later he was
promoted master, and in February, 1862, was commissioned second
lieutenant. He served on the lower James river until March, 1862,
when he participated in the naval battle on Hampton Roads,
commanding the after division of the Patrick Henry in that combat.
Subsequently, when Norfolk was being evacuated he ran the blockade
carrying stores. At Drewry's bluff, when the Federal fleet
attempted to ascend the river, the Patrick Henry was dismantled
and the guns mounted on the bluff, when in the action of May 15,
1862, he served with distinction in command of the naval gun
that was nearest the enemy. He remained at Drewry's bluff for some
time, and in August, 1863, was detailed to select men for the daring
expedition against the Federal gunboats Satellite and Reliance at the
mouth of the Rappahannock river. Under Col. John Taylor Wood he was
second in command, having charge of two of the four small boats which
constituted the attacking squadron. He led the attack upon the
Reliance and was the first on board, and fighting his way forward
with great gallantry, was struck in the neck by a pistol ball, and
fell upon the deck. The expedition was successful, but the dangerous
wound which Lieutenant Hoge had received disabled him until October,
1863. Before leaving Drewry's bluff he served upon the naval
examining board, and immediately after being detached from that
station he acted for six or eight months as second lieutenant of the
ironclad Richmond, under Captain Pegram. His next duty was the
torpedo service on the Chowan and Roanoke rivers, and while in this
field he participated in another famous expedition under Colonel
Wood, the capture of the large Federal gunboat Underwriter, which had
taken a conspicuous part in the operations along the North Carolina
coast. The attack was made in rowboats, on the Neuse river, under the
guns of Fort Stevens, and subject to a direct and heavy fire from the
enemy before the boats could grapple. Lieutenant Hoge was one of the
first on board, and took an efficient part in the successful action,
which was recognized by the Confederate Congress in a joint
resolution of thanks. It was the intention of the Confederate party
to get the vessel off, and to this end Lieutenant Hoge's duty was to
open the magazine and man the guns. Upon doing this, he reported
ready for action to Colonel Wood, but when the cable of the
Underwriter was slipped (a duty assigned to Lieut. W. A. Kerr, of
North Carolina, who was slightly wounded), her bow swung ashore,
consequently the vessel was abandoned. But as they were leaving.
Captain Wood, thinking she was not on fire, sent Hoge back to make
sure of her destruction. He and the cockswain of his boat were the
only ones who went aboard, each with a canteen of camphene. The ship
was ablaze before they had got twenty boats' lengths away. Soon after
this exploit, in February, 1864, Lieutenant Hoge was assigned to the
Confederate ironclad Neuse, at Kinston, N. C., as executive officer,
and he served in this capacity until the evacuation of Kinston, in
March, 1865. On May 11, 1865, he was paroled at Macon, Ga., and he
then made his home at Halifax, Nova Scotia, during a period of five
years. Returning to Virginia in 1870, he came to Wheeling, which has
been his home since that date. In 1881 he was elected city engineer,
an office he held continuously until 1895, except during the year
1883, when he served by appointment of Governor Matthews as a member
of the commission to settle the boundary between Pennsylvania and
West Virginia. He is widely known as an accomplished civil engineer.


(Linda Fluharty

Gravesite Details

The photo of what might be his military stone is illegible so I am uncertain if it is indeed his.



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