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Capt James Craig

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Capt James Craig

Birth
Death
5 Mar 1816 (aged 71)
Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, USA
Burial
Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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Capt. James Craig has five other children buried in the Craig Cemetery also and they are Hiram, Andrew, Thomas, Mary, and Sarah Craig Wright.
Capt James Craig was a Revolutionary War hero and was given land in Kentucky as a reward for his service during the war. At a meeting at the home of John Dennis for the purpose of forming a new county out of Logan and Christian Counties on May 28, 1799 was James Craig who with others was given the oath of a Justice of the Peace. This was the first court of Mulhenburg Co. Ky. and the minutes of this court was signed by Capt. James Craig. He also started the first store in the county with another pioneer James Weir in Greenville in 1799.

A Brief History of Captain James Craig's Adult Life 1773-1816 , Virginia and Kentucky James Craig was one of the notable pioneering residents of Abingdon, Virginia, having settled there in 1773 or earlier. He fought in the Revolutionary War in Captain James Knox's Company of the Eighth Virginia Regiment of Foot of the Continental Line, commanded by Col. Abraham Bowman. The Eight Regiment was formed in 1775 under the command of John Muhlenberg, and James Craig may have joined with the initial muster. Company Muster Roll and Pay Roll records show him in service (at least) through the period May-August 1777. In 1774, he was deeded 480 acres on the Middle Fork of the Holston River, in the region in Southwestern Virginia that became known as Washington County in 1777 (and remains so named today). Between 1773 and 1777, the region had been a part of Fincastle County, and still earlier (1770-1774), it had been part of Botetort County. This part of the Virginia was still on the frontiers of civilization at that time. After settling in Abingdon, James Craig served in the Revolutionary War. He fought with the Eighth Virginia Regiment of the Continental Line, attaining the rank of Captain. Following the war, Captain Craig returned to Abingdon and, in August 1782, the Captain was sworn in as a Deputy Sheriff of Washington County. In 1783, Revolutionary War records show that he was awarded 4000 acres of bounty land as a reward for three years of service during the war; however, no deed for this amount of land in Virginia has been sighted. Perhaps this is the tract he eventually received in Kentucky. As late as 1787, marauding Cherokee Indians killed many men, women and children in the Abingdon area and a number of outlaws [Tories and other white desperadoes] had taken refuge in the area and were causing mischief. The Captain probably was kept quite busy maintaining the peace but he found time to marry. Records are sketchy, but he apparently had a wife, Martha, in the 1780's, who gave birth to a daughter, Margaret (Peggy), in 1783 and the couple and three sons John, James and Robert. These sons are named in his Last Will and Testament. Martha died in 1790. Washington County documents record Captain James Craig's remarriage that year to Catherine McClanahan, on 7 December 1790. There were two sons of this marriages, William and Thomas, also named in the Captain's Will. James's daughter from his first marriage, Margaret, married a man named Talbert, and she is mentioned in the Captain's Will as Margaret Talbert [or Tolbert]. On 24 September 1795 records in Abingdon, Virginia show that the Reverend Nickolas Regan performed a marriage ceremony between the Captain and the widow, Sally Dickenson [nee Sarah Granger], the mother of Garland Dickenson. Sarah and her son Garland went with the Captain to Muhlenburg County, Kentucky, arriving before 26 March 1798, when their first son together, Andrew, was born. As a reward for his service during the Revolution, General John Muhlenberg of Woodstock, Virginia, commander of the 8th Virginia Regiment in which Capt. James Craig had served, was awarded land in Kentucky. This land was to be distributed among veterans who had served with him. The land was surveyed in 1793 and, in 1798, a new county in Kentucky was formed. General Muhlenberg never lived there, but the county was named in honor of him. At some time between September 1795 and December 1798, Captain James Craig and his family left Abingdon, Virginia, abandoning his land there [later sold for back taxes] and moved to Muhlenberg County, Kentucky. On 22 Dec 1798, the Governor of Kentucky appoint James Craig one of six Justices of the newly-formed county. James and Sarah ("Sally") Craig had six children together after arriving in Kentucky, in addition to the children James had by previous marriages. He lived in Muhlenberg County until his death in 1816. Many descendants continue to live there today.
Capt. James Craig was the first one buried in the Craig Family Cemetery, his son Thomas followed just a few months later. The Cemetery is located in Rosewood, Kentucky.
Capt. James Craig has five other children buried in the Craig Cemetery also and they are Hiram, Andrew, Thomas, Mary, and Sarah Craig Wright.
Capt James Craig was a Revolutionary War hero and was given land in Kentucky as a reward for his service during the war. At a meeting at the home of John Dennis for the purpose of forming a new county out of Logan and Christian Counties on May 28, 1799 was James Craig who with others was given the oath of a Justice of the Peace. This was the first court of Mulhenburg Co. Ky. and the minutes of this court was signed by Capt. James Craig. He also started the first store in the county with another pioneer James Weir in Greenville in 1799.

A Brief History of Captain James Craig's Adult Life 1773-1816 , Virginia and Kentucky James Craig was one of the notable pioneering residents of Abingdon, Virginia, having settled there in 1773 or earlier. He fought in the Revolutionary War in Captain James Knox's Company of the Eighth Virginia Regiment of Foot of the Continental Line, commanded by Col. Abraham Bowman. The Eight Regiment was formed in 1775 under the command of John Muhlenberg, and James Craig may have joined with the initial muster. Company Muster Roll and Pay Roll records show him in service (at least) through the period May-August 1777. In 1774, he was deeded 480 acres on the Middle Fork of the Holston River, in the region in Southwestern Virginia that became known as Washington County in 1777 (and remains so named today). Between 1773 and 1777, the region had been a part of Fincastle County, and still earlier (1770-1774), it had been part of Botetort County. This part of the Virginia was still on the frontiers of civilization at that time. After settling in Abingdon, James Craig served in the Revolutionary War. He fought with the Eighth Virginia Regiment of the Continental Line, attaining the rank of Captain. Following the war, Captain Craig returned to Abingdon and, in August 1782, the Captain was sworn in as a Deputy Sheriff of Washington County. In 1783, Revolutionary War records show that he was awarded 4000 acres of bounty land as a reward for three years of service during the war; however, no deed for this amount of land in Virginia has been sighted. Perhaps this is the tract he eventually received in Kentucky. As late as 1787, marauding Cherokee Indians killed many men, women and children in the Abingdon area and a number of outlaws [Tories and other white desperadoes] had taken refuge in the area and were causing mischief. The Captain probably was kept quite busy maintaining the peace but he found time to marry. Records are sketchy, but he apparently had a wife, Martha, in the 1780's, who gave birth to a daughter, Margaret (Peggy), in 1783 and the couple and three sons John, James and Robert. These sons are named in his Last Will and Testament. Martha died in 1790. Washington County documents record Captain James Craig's remarriage that year to Catherine McClanahan, on 7 December 1790. There were two sons of this marriages, William and Thomas, also named in the Captain's Will. James's daughter from his first marriage, Margaret, married a man named Talbert, and she is mentioned in the Captain's Will as Margaret Talbert [or Tolbert]. On 24 September 1795 records in Abingdon, Virginia show that the Reverend Nickolas Regan performed a marriage ceremony between the Captain and the widow, Sally Dickenson [nee Sarah Granger], the mother of Garland Dickenson. Sarah and her son Garland went with the Captain to Muhlenburg County, Kentucky, arriving before 26 March 1798, when their first son together, Andrew, was born. As a reward for his service during the Revolution, General John Muhlenberg of Woodstock, Virginia, commander of the 8th Virginia Regiment in which Capt. James Craig had served, was awarded land in Kentucky. This land was to be distributed among veterans who had served with him. The land was surveyed in 1793 and, in 1798, a new county in Kentucky was formed. General Muhlenberg never lived there, but the county was named in honor of him. At some time between September 1795 and December 1798, Captain James Craig and his family left Abingdon, Virginia, abandoning his land there [later sold for back taxes] and moved to Muhlenberg County, Kentucky. On 22 Dec 1798, the Governor of Kentucky appoint James Craig one of six Justices of the newly-formed county. James and Sarah ("Sally") Craig had six children together after arriving in Kentucky, in addition to the children James had by previous marriages. He lived in Muhlenberg County until his death in 1816. Many descendants continue to live there today.
Capt. James Craig was the first one buried in the Craig Family Cemetery, his son Thomas followed just a few months later. The Cemetery is located in Rosewood, Kentucky.

Inscription

IN MEMORY OF CAPT. JAMES CRAIG

Gravesite Details

Headstone in very bad shape



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